Archives de catégorie : Appels à contributions

Call for proposals : Politicizing the domestic worker. Socio-historical perspectives on domestic labor in Africa

Call for proposals to the journal Politique africaine

Politicizing the domestic worker.

Socio-historical perspectives on domestic labor in Africa

Special issue coordinated by Mélanie Jacquemin, sociologist at the IRD (UMR 151 LPED, AMU/IRD) and Violaine Tisseau, historian at the CNRS (UMR 8171 IMAf, AMU/CNRS/EHESS/IRD/EPHE/Paris 1).

Presentation of the present issue

The impetus of this special issue is a finding in a field of research and publications that is, at the very least, fragmented: studies about work done in the private sphere remain on the sidelines in the literature on labor in Africa. Here we invite authors to further explore how a domestic service market has established itself in societies won over by modernity and new forms of legal regulations, despite the frequent persistence of traditional, hierarchical relationships, extolled through the language of kinship, in domestic labor. This language generally dilutes the concept of work (value and social relationships) and maintains the permeable line between domestic labor/employment for the benefit of others and non-delegated household chores. Combined with the trivialized nature of the occupation, the domestic workers’ status as “society’s youngest family member” raises questions. How do these categories of workers participate in countries’ social and economic citizenship, which sometimes has been refused to them on the grounds that household work is fixed in the status quo of beliefs and the private domain, while rationality and public recognition are still deemed appropriate to labor performed outside of the domestic sphere?

Context and challenges

Because it is performed in private settings, domestic labor is unique in that it is usually perceived as unproductive and eluding both economic accounting systems and State regulation. Nevertheless, there are multiple forms of employment or domestic service: formal, informal, paid, paid in kind, reported or not, etc. With the goal of considering and deciphering this diversity with its sometimes-blurred contours, we have adopted a broad meaning, with an updated definition of “putting people to work (mise au travail)” (Lautier, 1998) as a minimum criterion. By reconsidering this activity as labor, we are able to introduce the issue of policy, firstly, because domestic work is perceived the same way as work performed in any other space. Secondly, investigating the various conditions and modalities of domestic service; how it is regulated (via private, community, State, or intermediary entities); and the forms of domestic workers’ resistance, and even protest (from the most discreet to the most overt) sheds further light on the inner workings of establishing citizenship and constructing a State.

By focusing on empirical approaches, we hope to highlight the importance of contexts—whether political, social, economic, or historic—and bring together articles examining different spaces and time periods. The conditions of domestic service, ways in which dissatisfaction can build up, and opportunities for protesting differ in the colonial period, under apartheid, or throughout the fight for independence, for example, or during periods of economic growth or crisis. While a refusal, or even a denial, to be noticed or recognized renders many male and female domestic workers invisible (Jacquemin, 2009), are their mobilizations also doomed to remain invisible because they are rare and barrow from multiple forms? Definitely not, and by analyzing the situation of domestic employees in Rio de Janeiro, Dominique Vidal (2007) convincingly showed how they were at the very heart of Brazilian democracy.

This special issue also encourages authors to consider a new international context, emerging from the adoption of normative tools driven by United Nations agencies, and to examine how this context is conveyed. In June 2011, the International Labour Organization (ILO) adopted Convention No. 189, encouraging States to regulate domestic employment to “extend basic labor rights to domestic workers worldwide.”[1]

For the youngest workers (including the many “little maids” in Africa), the ratification of ILO Conventions No. 138 and No. 182 on Child Labor is becoming more widespread in African States, which have all ratified the International Convention on the Rights of the Child, adopted by the United Nations in 1989. At the same time, NGOs and associations have redoubled their child protection programs; while the dominant abolitionist platform can antagonize supporters of child-worker practices or “demands,” some organizations under the banner of the African Movement of Working Children and Youth have joined together to give a voice to domestic workers who are overlooked by society and often forgotten in the academic field.

Objectives

While most of the current research on “domestic workers” applies a globalized economic approach that links this issue to the rise in female South-North migration, this special issue aims to focus on African domestic labor from yesterday to today, which—despite a substantial migratory component on both an internal and intra-African scale and remarkable changes—remains overshadowed by more dramatic transformations seen in the North, such as those spurred by international migrations or the phenomenon of trafficking in women and children. Drawing from our research on “the” domestic worker in Africa from the perspectives of a historian and a socio-ethnographer, we support the merits of an expanded exploration of the multiple forms of domestic service in Africa in this special issue. At the very least, this promotes continuity, via the issue of domestic labor, to support efforts to “reconnect discussions on the link between the political and social order to be able to report from a non-culturalist stance on the ways in which it is possible and imaginable to be heard” (Siméant, 2013: 141).

We want to examine the economic, political, and symbolic significance of the changes at play in diverse social contexts and then identify other aspects that have remained unchanged and what these mean, while unveiling elements specific to the African context, especially with respect to gender relations. We will do this in three ways. First, we will examine the changes in labor relations (from familial logics to wage-type contractual relationships; task specialization; forms of hiring; maintaining dependent relationships, passed down through slavery; the force of paternalistic relationships; etc.). We will also analyze day-to-day relationships within households in terms of gender, class, “race,” and age and how these factors are embodied and transcribed in practices and discourses, or even in spaces. Lastly, we will examine these changes by describing what means are available—or not—to domestic workers to resist domination.

The gender perspective is highly encouraged in this special  as a crosscutting tool for analysis. Since research overall shows that domestic service is socially constructed around the globe as a subordinate function defined in terms of gender, the study of domestic labor in Africa—in all its variations and evolutions—provides especially fertile ground for analyzing the potential transformations of dominant gender relationships through reconsideration or consolidation. Central to the analysis of inequalities between women and men that primarily affect women, domestic labor in Africa often and still specifically identifies as masculine (recalling, for example, the Burkinabe “boys” in Abidjan or the “ababuyi” of Bujumbura), urging us to examine how the different relationships of domination overlap.

Three key points could be explored (though other approaches could be combined with these):

  • Describe, recognize, and quantify domestic labor in Africa

The first key point aims to describe the various forms of domestic service in Africa, by varying the scope in time and space. It will focus on showing the diversity and plurality of employment status, employers, working conditions and situations, etc.

When attempting to typologize domestic labor, researchers face challenges with vocabulary. Ordinary Francophone (and Anglophone) terminology does not fully express the range of working conditions, so vernacular terms will also be studied: in Madagascar, for example, the use of the term boto (right-hand man, servant) has shifted towards using mpanampy (someone who helps).

Moreover, many African societies share a specific feature, namely, the existence—both in the past and now—of the status of slave[2] (passed on via kinship), as well as child circulation practices (“fostering”) that keep individuals in situations of dependence and even servitude (Jacquemin, 2000). Colonization did not do away with the social status of slave and descendants of slaves by abolishing slavery, leaving domestic jobs immune to any regulation (Haskins, 2015). Domestic labor is often performed by individuals who are exposed to diverse forms of vulnerability in a given social context, with their status as an employee not always recognized as such. Therefore, domestic workers’ age, sex, and geographic and social origins will be variables to consider, given that radical changes are sometimes observed in the workforce. While Karen Hansen (1989) emphasizes that domestic workers were primarily men in Zambia, the opposite was true several years later when more women held these jobs (Hepburn, 2016).

  • Plurality of standards

This second key point will address the issue of regulating domestic service in order to document the varied ways it is implemented: by the State, “communities” (families, lineages, parishes), the private sector (placement agencies, etc.) or associations, etc. It introduces the issue of a plurality of standards and their dynamics (Chauveau et al., 2001), seen through the prism of the range of domestic service practices, from the co-existence of formal and informal standards on different levels, stemming from “varied sources of legitimacy.”

The broad formalization of domestic service is therefore a point to explore, in connection with the gradual State supervision of labor and the implementation of social protection systems, such as: Do domestic workers pay into social security or pensions? Are they reported in the national tax records? The use of contracts for work over time is another issue for reflection.

By continuing to ask the explicit question about economic recognition of domestic labor, which, achieved through hard-fought struggle in several countries (Ibos, 2016), remains quite incomplete in Africa, we can also strive to understand exactly how barriers and progress come into play depending on the socio-political contexts. Focusing on female domestic workers’ involvement in negotiating ILO Convention No. 189 concerning “Decent Work for Domestic Workers,” Helen Schwenken recalls that “the sine qua non condition for mobilization is seeing these women as “employees”—and not as “maids” or “servants”—and recognizing the private household as a workplace” (Schwenken, 2011: 114).

  • Mobilization: actors and repertoires of action

In an effort to challenge representations of domestic workers’ eternal consent, we also urge authors to explore the notion of a moral economy through domestic workers’ expressions and positions. As Johanna Siméant suggests, this especially involves questioning the ways in which “forms of lateral dissent” are captured (2013: 136) and “discerning the expression of dissent in instances without necessarily proposing an articulated political agenda” (Siméant, 2010: 150). Thus, reproducing social positions, the relationship to the State, and the expression of dissatisfaction are central issues that merit a deeper understanding of their interconnectedness.

Of course, domestic labor cannot be addressed as a specific sphere of activism, but it can no longer be completely excluded from the field of studies on collective action and mobilizations, even if the former take (or took) on different and unusual forms of expression and means of action in the space of urban labor movements in Africa. This is now well documented through the sociology of social movements that have spread across the African continent for twenty years (Siméant, 2013; Tall et al., 2015).

Using a micro-ethnography of conflicts or a more conventional analysis of institutionalized movements, this last point seeks to investigate the potential registers for mobilization—individual (avoidance, resistance to the routine, fleeing, legal action, etc.) or even implicit, or collective and public (unions, associations, etc.)—that this diverse category of workers can develop, from a combination of historical, sociological, and anthropological perspectives and in varied contexts. What strong correlations exist between a social group’s transformations and its propensity to mobilize itself? How does one go from resistance that leaves structures unchanged to broader action that is greater than any individual or private space? In an extension of the special issue in Politique africaine devoted to post-slavery and collective mobilizations (No. 140, 2015/4), here we will be interested in mobilizations founded on the demand for a common worker status. What connections might exist with workers organized around a common ancestry (descendants of slaves) and with extroverted forms of struggles? Under what conditions does one go from socially recognizing subordinate groups’ activities—in this case domestic workers—to normalizing their participation in citizenship and political life?

Proposals of unpublished articles (1 page) may be sent in French or English to the coordinators of the special issue until 4 December 2018.

melanie.jacquemin@ird.fr, violaine.tisseau@gmail.com

Schedule

4 Dec. 2018: deadline for sending article proposals (1 page maximum) to the special issue coordinators

14 Dec. 2018: author’s notified about selected proposals

15 March 2019: deadline for sending articles (50,000 characters, spaces and notes included) to the journal’s editorial board

Summer 2019: publication of the special issue.

References cited

Chauveau Jean-Pierre, Le Pape Marc, Olivier de Sardan Jean-Pierre, 2001, “La pluralité des normes et leurs dynamiques en Afrique : implications pour les politiques publiques,” in: Winter Gérard (coord.). Inégalités et politiques publiques en Afrique : pluralité des normes et jeux d’acteurs, Paris: IRD/Karthala, p. 145–162.

Hansen Tranberg Karen, 1989, Distant Companions: Servants and Employers in Zambia, 1900–1985, Ithaca: Oxford University Press

Haskins Victoria, 2015, Colonization and Domestic Service. Historical and Contemporary Perspectives, Oxford: Routledge.

Hepburn Sacha, 2016, “Bringing a Girl from the Village: Gender, Child Migration and Domestic Service in Post-Colonial Zambia,” in Marie Rodet and Elodie Razy (eds), Children on the Move in Africa: Past and Present Experiences of Migration, Woodbridge: James Currey, p. 69–84.

Ibos Caroline, 2016, “Travail domestique/domesticité,” Encyclopédie critique du genre. Corps, sexualité, rapports sociaux, Paris: La Découverte, p. 649–658.

Jacquemin Mélanie, 2000, “‘Petites nièces’ et petites bonnes, le travail des fillettes en milieu urbain de Côte-d’Ivoire,” Journal des Africanistes, 70 (1–2), p. 105–122.

Jacquemin Mélanie, 2009. “Invisible Young Female Migrant Workers: ‘Little Domestics’ in West Africa—Comparative Perspectives on Girls and Young Women’s Work”, Working Paper – Development Research Centre on Migration, Globalisation and Poverty/ University of Sussex, and Centre for Migration Studies/ University of Ghana, Accra. http://horizon.documentation.ird.fr/exl-doc/pleins_textes/divers16-06/010067209.pdf

Lautier Bruno, 1998. “Pour une sociologie de l’hétérogénéité du travail,” Tiers-Monde, volume 39, no. 154, p. 251–279.

Schwenken Helen, 2011. “Mobilisation des travailleuses domestiques migrantes : de la cuisine à l’Organisation internationale du travail,” Cahiers du Genre 2/2011, 51, p. 113–133.

Siméant Johanna, 2010, “’Économie morale’ et protestation – détours africains,” Genèses, 2010, 4, no. 81, p. 142–160.

Siméant Johanna, 2013, “Protester / mobiliser / ne pas consentir. Sur quelques avatars de la sociologie des mobilisations appliquée au continent africain,” Revue internationale de politique comparée, 2013, 2, vol. 20, p. 125–143.

Tall Kadya, Pommerolle Marie-Emmanuelle, Cahen Michel, 2015, Collective Mobilisations in Africa / Mobilisations collectives en Afrique, Leiden: Brill.

Vidal Dominique, 2007, Les bonnes de Rio. Emploi domestique et société démocratique au Brésil, Villeneuve d’Ascq: Presses Universitaires du Septentrion.

[1] ILO Convention No. 189 and Recommendation No. 201, on Decent Work for Domestic Workers. Entered into force in September 2013, this convention has only been ratified by 25 countries to date. On the African continent, only South Africa and Guinea have ratified it. In Senegal, for example, despite campaigns led by unions since 2011 in support of the international initiative “12 ratifications in 2012,” the government has left this issue unresolved.

[2] On this point, the special issue proposed here could be seen as an extension of special issue No. 140 of Politique africaine (“La question de l’esclavage en Afrique : Politisation et mobilisations [The Issue of Slavery in Africa: Politicization and Mobilizations],” which does not include any articles specifically addressing the issue of domestic labor.

African media industries and global capitalism/ L’audiovisuel africain et le capitalisme global

Call for paper / Appel à Communication, numéro Spécial de Politique Africaine

African media industries and global capitalism/L’audiovisuel africain et le capitalisme global

Sous la direction de Alessandro Jedlowski

(Collaborateur Scientifique FRS-FNRS, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgique)

[ENGLISH VERSION/VERSION ANGLAISE]

Over the past three decades, the African audiovisual sector has undergone radical transformations. Technological innovation and processes of political and economic liberalization made access to media production and distribution affordable for segments of the population who had hardly been able to play an active role in these sectors. In early post-independent Africa the economy of screen media production and dissemination was mostly controlled by local governments and foreign donors, and this had a fundamental impact on the genres and the overall quality of the contents produced. In what concern entertainment media, if the technical quality of the production was often of high standards, the media contents tended to be mostly oriented toward international audiences rather than larger, Africa-based publics (cf. Barlet 1996; Diawara 1992; Ukadike 1994). But throughout the 1990s and the early 2000s these traditional actors were progressively sidelined by a more dynamic ecosystem of small entrepreneurs who produced media contents with limited budgets and low-end technologies for local distribution via mainly informal networks (cf. Lobato 2012). The video film industries that saw the light in countries such as Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Ethiopia and Cameroun (Böhme 2013; Dipio 2014; Garritano 2013; Haynes 2016 and 2000; Mayer 2015; Krings and Okome 2013; Krings and Reuster-Jahn 2014; Larkin 2008; Overbergh 2015; Santanera 2015; Thomas, Jedlowski and Ashagrie 2018), as well as the private television production sectors that emerged in countries such as Côte d’Ivoire and the Democratic Republic of Congo (Dénommé 2018; Pype 2012) are the best examples of such dynamic, which participated in reshaping not only the reality of African screen media but also the theoretical frameworks adopted to study it.[1]

If early African cinema had been often analyzed through the lens of politically-militant Third Cinema theory (Ukadike 1994; Bakari and Cham 1996; see also Guneratne and Dissanayake 2003), the new video film and popular television industries were interpreted by borrowing the concepts and methodological tools formulated by anthropologists such as Karin Barber (1987; 1997) and Johannes Fabian (1978; 1990) for the study of postcolonial African urban popular cultures (Haynes 2000; Bisschoff and Overbergh 2012; Newell and Okome 2013). According to this perspective, the emerging screen media production was to be understood as the expression of vernacular “cottage culture industries”, “existing parallel to state and private monopolistic culture industries and engaging in various forms of competition with and contestation of state and corporate dream factories” (Peterson 2003: 199-200). In particular, most researches underlined the social and cultural proximity between cultural producers and consumers that could be observed in these industries. Under this light, new media contents as well as the economic and social processes behind their production were considered as windows into emerging forms of politics “from below” (cf. Bayart, Mbembe and Toulabor 1992; see also Haynes 2006; McCall 2007), whose study could help scholars grasp the processes of formation of peculiar forms of “Afromodernity” (Comaroff and Comaroff 2004).[2]

The pan-African and global success of industries such as the Nigerian “Nollywood” seemed to confirm already widespread techno-optimistic views about the democratic impact of technological innovation on processes of cultural production and dissemination, and further encouraged the work of international organizations promoting public and corporate investment in creative industries as a way to foster economic development in Africa (UNDP and UNESCO 2013; see also De Beukelaer 2015). In 2014, after a recalculation of its GDP which included the economic output of local creative industries, Nigeria became the largest African economy. While this was an indisputable evidence of the productive nature of fuzzy numbers, discussed by Tejaswini Ganti with reference to the Indian film industry (2015), it equally had a powerful impact on the local and international discourses about African media and creative industries, further attracting international investors to the sector.

These processes were paralleled by further technological innovation which had a major impact on the way media contents were distributed around the continent (Jedlowski 2016; 2017). On the one hand, following a global trend toward the dematerialization of media circulation, in Africa tangible media technologies of distribution such as videotapes, VCDs and DVDs were progressively replaced by immaterial forms of distribution such as internet streaming and Video on Demand (VOD) platforms, file sharing via USB drives, mobile phones and Bluetooth devices. On the other hand, the continental shift from analogue to digital broadcasting, which according to the deadline set by the United Nations agency for telecommunication (International Telecommunication Union – ITU) will have to be achieved globally between 2015 and 2020, injected fresh blood in the African broadcasting economy, multiplying the content offer, and driving the audience back to the small screen and further away from videotapes and DVD readers. As Claude Forest (2011: 64) underlined, the technological gap that the African audiovisual sector had accumulated over its first few decades of existence, made the impact of recent innovations more radical, opening unprecedented possibilities but also generating controversial consequences.

This special issue intends to focus on these more recent transformations in order to analyze their impact on the economy and politics of audiovisual production and distribution in Africa, as well as on the theoretical and methodological frameworks that, as scholars, we adopt to study them. Proposals focusing on one or more of the following axes will be privileged:

  • As mentioned above, the new wave of low-budget audiovisual production that has emerged throughout the 1990s and early 2000s was mainly interpreted through the prism of the concept of popular culture. But several scholars in the field of Nollywood studies (Adejunmobi 2015; Haynes 2014; Jedlowski 2013; Ryan 2015) have shown how Nollywood, as well as other similar screen media industries around the continent (Jedlowski 2018), is shifting toward new economic models in which both local and international corporations such as the French Canal Plus, the South African Multichoice, the Nigerian-American iROKO, and the Chinese StarTimes play a major role. Within this framework, the conceptual and methodological tools offered by the anthropology of African popular culture seem to have become, at least partially, obsolete. How to make sense of the processes of formation and consolidation of African cultural industries which are deeply interrelated to global mechanism of capital accumulation? What conceptual frameworks and what theories could be formulated to understand the economic shift taking place over the past few years? If the corporate takeover affecting African screen media industries can be related to wider processes of global neoliberal transformation, it is also connected to longer-term dynamics and to a specific African history of extravertion (Bayart 2000), “tradition of invention” (Guyer 1996), mimesis and adaptation (Krings 2015). We thus need analytical frameworks that can highlight both the continuities and discontinuities that emerging economic models entertain with previous forms.
  • This research agenda requires us also to renew our methodological approaches. Access to the informal African screen media industries of the 1990s and early 2000s was relatively easy, because media professionals were generally keen in gaining larger international exposure, and the industry had no formal system in place to protect the circulation of commercial information. But today the situation has radically transformed, and to conduct research on African screen media industries can be likened to what anthropologists and media scholars working on western media industries labeled as research in a “difficult environment” (David-Ismayil, Dugonjic and Lecler 2015; see also Born 2005; Caldwell 2008; Ortner 2009 and 2013). This means working in contexts with difficult access, characterized by a high level of confidentiality, which therefore requires flexible and step-by-step approaches. What kind of methodological tools can be developed in order to conduct research in these kinds of environments? Where can the researcher gather the information needed to analyze the economic modes of operation of companies which build their competitive advantage on concealing rather than revealing information about their activities? Case studies which include an explicit problematization of the methodological approach they adopt will be welcome for inclusion in the special issue.
  • Technological transformation had a very important impact on how people access media contents around the continent. If tangible distribution technologies such as videotapes, VCDs and DVDs made the fortune of emerging screen media industries in Nigeria, Ghana and elsewhere in the 1980s and 1990s, this was because these technologies were widespread and relatively easy to access. On the contrary, the progressive move toward high-tech multiplex cinemas, internet distribution and satellite televisions is making access more difficult for segments of the population that, until recently, constituted the bulk of African screen media industries. As the American anthropologist Jeff Himpele underlined in his work on film distribution in Bolivia, the analysis of distribution “is the analysis of difference-distributing sets of relations” (1996: 60), and to focus on the recent transformations in the economy and politics of media circulation in Africa can offer analytical insights in the ongoing transformation of African societies and on the impact of neoliberal economic policies. How, then, to theorize the processes of formation of African publics at a time in which the transformation of distribution technologies has created new mechanism of differentiation which produce profit out of fragmenting audiences into different segments defined by their spending-habits, and by providing different qualities of products to each of them? Much of the scholarship that has focused on the emergence and popular success of African video film industries like Nollywood insisted on these industries’ capacity to creating forms of transnational, pan-African popular culture, able to cut across economic and social differences (cf. McCall 2007). Is this a position that can still be defended? How do new media technologies and the new media contents produced to fit these new platforms, “address” their audiences (cf. Barber 2007)? What kind of publics do these new modes of narrative and technological address constitute? How do they differ from the “addressivity” of media products circulating earlier, through analogical and tangible media distribution networks?
  • As seen earlier, a large number of the studies about African screen media industries that have emerged over the past two decades tended to share a common optimistic assumption: in societies considered (from a western point of view) as generally lacking freedom of expression, the introduction of new technologies and the exponential increase in creative expression would provoke an acceleration in processes of democratic transformation and an increase in the chances for upward social mobility. This optimism has often hidden the complex intertwining between the opportunities for the formulation of critical thinking that this emerging production has created, and the forms of political control and economic marginalization that it has equally helped in consolidating, and has thus participated in obscuring rather than highlighting the complex processes “by which art is produced and meanings conveyed” (Cooper 1987: 102; see also Jedlowski 2015). Within this framework, the more recent transformations that were provoked by the technological shift discussed above, have participated in making access to technology more expensive and have tended to accelerate process of monopolization rather than economic differentiation in processes of media production and dissemination (McChesney 2013; Jedlowski 2017). As elsewhere in the world, also in Africa the wave of techno-optimism that followed the introduction of new media technologies and social media networks is being replaced by more cautious appreciations of the political and economic impact of large processes of corporatization which tend to put the control of media production and circulation in fewer rather than more hands. On the ground of these assumptions, how should we assess the impact of new media and technological transformation on African societies and economies? What patterns of social and economic mobility is it helping to foster? What categories of people and what interests have benefited from technological change, and what have been left at the margins?
  • Finally, while the technological transformations described above have helped to transform the position of African screen media industries in the broader context of global capitalism, they have also had an impact on the organization of work within these same industries. The increase of commercial competition and the formalization of certain sectors of production and distribution caused by the arrival of large international companies, for example, have profoundly transformed the way of conceiving and implementing forms of collaboration between local media professionals. At the same time, the introduction of new technologies has had a major impact on the way in which work is organized, during production, as well as in the pre- and post-production phase, provoking the emergence of new professional figures and destabilizing the delicate organizational systems that had characterized the world of local media production until then. What has been, then, the impact of the technological and economic transformations mentioned above on the lives and working conditions of producers and distributors of African media contents? How have the dynamics of global capitalism been reflected at the micro level of daily interactions between media professionals? Answering to these questions will enable us to capture “the ways that power operates locally through media production to reproduce social hierarchies and inequalities at the level of daily interaction” (Mayer 2009: 15).

Interested contributors should send a one-page maximum summary of their paper and a short bio to Alessandro Jedlowski (alessandro.jedlowski@gmail.com) by the 10th of December. Acceptance of proposals will be notified by 30th of December and the full papers will have to be sent by the 30th of March. The issue is scheduled for publication before the end of 2019. Contributions should be no longer than 8000 words/50.000 characters and can be in English or French, but the final language of the publication will be French.

[FRENCH VERSION/VERSION FRANCAISE]

Au cours des trois dernières décennies, le secteur audiovisuel africain a traversé des transformations radicales. L’innovation technologique et les processus de libéralisation politique et économique ont rendu l’accès à la production et à la distribution des médias accessible à des segments de la population qui n’avaient guère pu jouer un rôle actif dans ces secteurs. Au cours des premières années qui ont suivi l’indépendance de la plupart des pays d’Afrique subsaharienne, l’économie de la production et de la diffusion des médias audiovisuels était principalement contrôlée par les nouveaux gouvernements indépendants et par les bailleurs de fonds étrangers, ce qui a eu un impact fondamental sur le genre et la qualité des contenus produits. En ce qui concerne les médias de divertissement, ces premières productions tendaient à être principalement orientées vers des publics internationaux plutôt que vers des publics basés en Afrique (voir Barlet 1996, Diawara 1992, Ukadike 1994). Mais au cours des années 1990 et au début des années 2000, ces acteurs traditionnels ont été progressivement marginalisés par l’émergence d’un écosystème plus dynamique de petits entrepreneurs qui produisaient des contenus médiatiques avec des budgets limités et des technologies bas de gamme, destinés à une distribution locale via des réseaux principalement informels (Lobato 2012). Les industries du film vidéo qui ont vu le jour dans des pays comme le Nigéria, le Ghana, le Kenya, la Tanzanie, l’Ouganda, l’Ethiopie et le Cameroun (Böhme 2013, Dipio 2014, Garritano 2013, Haynes 2016 et 2000, Mayer 2015, Krings et Okome 2013, Krings et Reuster-Jahn 2014, Larkin 2008, Overbergh 2015, Santanera 2015, Thomas, Jedlowski et Ashagrie 2018), ainsi que les secteurs de production télévisuelle privés émergeant dans des pays comme la Côte d’Ivoire et la République Démocratique du Congo (Dénommé 2018; Pype 2012) sont les meilleurs exemples d’une telle dynamique, qui a contribué à remodeler non seulement la réalité des médias audiovisuels africains mais aussi les cadres théoriques adoptés pour les étudier.[3]

Si la production cinématographique africaine des premières décennies a été principalement analysée à travers la paradigme théorique, d’inspiration militante, du « Third Cinema » (Ukadike 1994; Bakari et Cham 1996; voir également Guneratne et Dissanayake 2003), la nouvelle production vidéo a été étudiée en adoptant des concepts et des outils méthodologiques proposés par des anthropologues tels que Karin Barber (1987; 1997) et Johannes Fabian (1978; 1990) dans leurs études des cultures populaires urbaines africaines postcoloniales (Haynes 2000; Bisschoff et Overbergh 2012; Newell et Okome 2013). Selon cette perspective, la production émergente de médias audiovisuels africains devait être comprise comme l’expression d’« industries culturelles artisanales […] qui existent parallèlement aux industries culturelles monopolistiques, étatiques et privées, et qui s’engagent dans diverses formes de compétition et de contestation de l’Etat et des industries privées [globales]» (Peterson 2003: 199-200). En particulier, la plupart des recherches sur ces nouvelles industries africaines de l’audiovisuel ont mis en évidence la proximité sociale et culturelle entre les producteurs et les consommateurs de ces produits médiatiques. Sous cette lumière, les contenus des nouveaux médias ainsi que les processus économiques et sociaux à l’origine de leur production ont été considérés comme des fenêtres ouvertes sur des formes émergentes de « politique par le bas » (voir Bayart, Mbembe et Toulabor 1992; voir aussi Haynes 2006; McCall 2007), dont l’étude pouvait permettre aux chercheurs de comprendre les processus de création de formes particulières d’« afromodernité » (Comaroff et Comaroff 2004).[4]

Le succès panafricain et mondial des nouvelles industries audiovisuelles africaines telles que le « Nollywood » nigérian a semblé confirmer le point de vue techno-optimiste sur l’impact de l’innovation technologique sur la démocratisation des processus de production et de diffusion des médias, et a ainsi davantage encouragé les initiatives des organisations internationales et les investissement des entreprises privées en faveur des industries créatives, comme moyen pour promouvoir la transition démocratique et le développement économique en Afrique (PNUD et UNESCO 2013; voir également De Beukelaer 2015). En 2014, après un nouveau calcul du PIB incluant les données relatives aux industries créatives locales, le Nigéria est devenu la plus grande économie africaine. Si d’un point de vue analytique, cette opération confirme la capacité presque magique des chiffres à influencer la réalité, évoquée par Tejaswini Ganti (2015) en référence à l’industrie cinématographique indienne, elle a également eu un impact considérable sur les discours locaux et internationaux concernant le secteur audiovisuel africain, attirant davantage d’investisseurs internationaux.

Ces processus ont été accompagnés par des innovations technologiques supplémentaires qui ont eu un impact majeur sur la distribution des contenus audiovisuels à travers le continent (Jedlowski 2016; 2017). D’une part, suivant une tendance mondiale à la dématérialisation de la circulation des médias, en Afrique les technologies de distribution matérielles telles que les cassettes vidéo, les VCD et les DVD ont été progressivement remplacées par des formes immatérielles de diffusion telles que le streaming, les plates-formes de vidéo à la demande, le partage de fichiers via des clés USB, des téléphones mobiles et des appareils Bluetooth. D’autre part, la transition à l’échelle continentale de la radiodiffusion analogique à la radiodiffusion numérique, qui selon l’échéance fixée par l’agence des Nations Unies pour les télécommunications (Union internationale des télécommunications – UIT), devra être réalisée à l’échelle globale entre 2015 et 2020, a injecté du sang frais dans l’économie de la radiodiffusion africaine, en multipliant l’offre de contenu et en rapprochant à nouveau le public du petit écran tout en l’éloignant des magnétoscopes et des lecteurs de DVD. Comme l’a souligné Claude Forest (2011: 64), le retard technologique que le secteur audiovisuel africain a accumulé au cours de ses premières décennies d’existence a radicalisé l’impact des innovations récentes, ouvrant des possibilités sans précédent, mais en provoquant également des conséquences parfois controversées.

Ce numéro spécial se concentre sur ces transformations plus récentes afin d’analyser leur impact sur l’économie et la politique de la production et de la distribution audiovisuelle en Afrique, ainsi que sur les cadres théoriques et méthodologiques que nous adoptons en tant que chercheurs pour les étudier. Les propositions portant sur un ou plusieurs des axes suivants seront privilégiées:

  • Comme mentionné ci-dessus, la nouvelle vague de production audiovisuelle à faible budget qui a émergé au cours des années 1990 et au début des années 2000 a été principalement interprétée à travers le prisme du concept de culture populaire. Mais plusieurs chercheurs dans le domaine des études sur Nollywood (Adejunmobi 2015; Haynes 2014; Jedlowski 2013; Ryan 2015) ont montré comment Nollywood, ainsi que d’autres industries audiovisuelles similaires à travers le continent (Jedlowski 2018) évoluent vers de nouveaux modèles économiques. Des compagnies de média locales et internationales telles que la française Canal Plus, la sud-africaine Multichoice, la nigériane-américaine iROKO et la chinoise StarTimes jouent désormais un rôle majeur. Dans ce cadre, les outils conceptuels et méthodologiques offerts par l’anthropologie de la culture populaire africaine semblent être devenus, du moins partiellement, obsolètes. Comment comprendre les processus de formation et de consolidation des nouvelles industries culturelles africaines étroitement liées aux mécanismes mondiaux d’accumulation du capital? Quels cadres conceptuels et quelles théories pourraient être formulés pour comprendre les évolutions économiques du secteur audiovisuel africain au cours des dernières années? Si la croissance de l’influence des entreprises globales de média sur le secteur audiovisuel africain peut être liée à des processus de transformation néolibérale à l’échelle mondiale, elle est également liée à une dynamique de plus long terme et à une histoire africaine spécifique d’extraversion (Bayart 2000), de « tradition de l’invention » (Guyer 1996), de mimesis et d’adaptation (Krings 2015). Nous avons donc besoin de cadres analytiques pouvant mettre en évidence les continuités et les discontinuités que les modèles économiques émergents entretiennent avec les formes précédentes.
  • Cet agenda de recherche nous oblige également à renouveler nos approches méthodologiques. L’accès aux industries informelles de médias des années 1990 et du début des années 2000 était relativement facile, car les professionnels des médias souhaitaient généralement se faire connaître à l’international et le secteur ne disposait d’aucun système officiel pour protéger la circulation des informations commerciales. Mais aujourd’hui, la situation s’est radicalement transformée et les recherches sur les industries audiovisuelles africaines peuvent être comparées à ce que les anthropologues et les spécialistes des médias travaillant sur les industries occidentales qualifient de recherche en « milieu difficile » (David-Ismayil, Dugonjic et Lecler 2015; voir également Born 2005; Caldwell 2008; Ortner 2009 et 2013). Cela signifie travailler dans des contextes difficiles d’accès, caractérisés par un haut niveau de confidentialité, ce qui nécessite des approches souples et par étapes. Quels types d’outils méthodologiques peuvent être développés pour mener à bon terme des recherches dans ces genres d’environnements? Où le chercheur peut-il recueillir les informations nécessaires pour analyser les modes de fonctionnement économiques d’entreprises qui créent un avantage commercial envers leurs compétiteurs précisément en dissimulant plutôt qu’en révélant des informations sur leurs activités? Les études de cas qui incluent une problématisation explicite de l’approche méthodologique qu’elles adopteront seront donc particulièrement bienvenues dans le cadre de ce numéro spécial de Politique Africaine.
  • La transformation technologique a eu un impact très important sur la manière dont les gens accèdent au contenu des médias à travers le continent. Si les technologies de distribution tangibles telles que les cassettes vidéo, les VCD et les DVD ont fait la fortune des industries audiovisuelles du Nigéria, du Ghana et d’autres pays subsahariens dans les années 1980 et 1990, c’est parce que ces technologies étaient largement répandues et relativement faciles d’accès. Au contraire, le passage progressif aux cinémas multiplexes, à la distribution par Internet et aux télévisions par satellite a rendu l’accès aux contenus médiatiques locaux plus difficile pour les couches plus pauvres de la population qui, jusqu’à une époque récente, constituaient l’essentiel du public des industries audiovisuelles africaines. Comme l’a souligné l’anthropologue américain Jeff Himpele dans ses travaux sur la distribution de films en Bolivie, l’analyse de la distribution « is the analysis of difference-distributing sets of relations » (1996: 60). Dans ce sens, l’analyse des transformations récentes de l’économie et de la politique de la circulation des médias en Afrique peut également permettre d’aborder l’analyse des processus plus larges de transformation sociale et économique en cours en Afrique, et en particulier de réfléchir à l’impact les politiques économiques néolibérales à travers le continent. Comment, alors, théoriser les processus de formation des publics africains à une époque où la transformation des technologies de distribution a créé un nouveau mécanisme de différenciation qui génère des profits en fragmentant les publics selon leurs possibilités de dépense, et en destinant des produits de qualité différente à chacun des différents segments ainsi définis? Une grande partie des études sur l’émergence et le succès populaire des industries audiovisuelles africaines comme Nollywood a insisté sur la capacité de ces industries à créer des formes de culture populaire transnationale et panafricaine capables de surmonter les différences économiques et sociales entre les différentes couches qui composent les sociétés africaines (cf. McCall 2007). Est-ce là une position qui peut encore être défendue? Comment les nouvelles technologies des médias et les nouveaux contenus médiatiques produits pour s’adapter à des nouvelles plateformes de distribution « répondent-ils » à leurs publics (cf. Barber 2007)? Quel genre de publics ces nouveaux modes de narration et d’adresse technologique constituent-ils? En quoi diffèrent-ils de « l’adressivité » (Barber 2007) des produits médiatiques qui circulaient plus tôt, par le biais de réseaux de distribution de médias analogiques et tangibles ?
  • Comme on l’a vu plus haut, un grand nombre d’études sur les industries audiovisuelles africaines qui ont émergé au cours des deux dernières décennies ont eu tendance à partager une hypothèse commune : dans des sociétés considérées, d’un point de vue occidental, comme ayant une faible liberté d’expression, l’introduction de nouvelles technologies et l’augmentation exponentielle de la liberté créative qui en serait le résultat auraient provoqué une accélération des processus de transformation démocratique et une augmentation des chances de mobilité sociale. Cet optimisme a souvent occulté l’interrelation complexe entre les opportunités de formulation de la pensée critique que cette production émergente a créée et les formes de contrôle politique et de marginalisation économique qu’elle a également contribué à consolider (voir aussi Jedlowski 2015). Dans ce cadre, les transformations plus récentes provoquées par les innovations technologiques évoquées ci-dessus ont contribué à rendre l’accès aux technologies plus coûteux et à enclencher des processus de monopolisation plutôt que de différenciation économique en ce qui concerne la production et la diffusion des médias (McChesney 2013; Jedlowski 2017). Comme ailleurs dans le monde, la vague de techno-optimisme qui a suivi l’introduction des réseaux sociaux et des nouvelles technologies des médias a été progressivement remplacée par une appréciation plus prudente de l’impact politique et économique de ces processus, qui, de fait, ont porté un nombre restreint de grandes compagnies internationales à contrôler une large partie de la production et de la diffusion des médias en Afrique. Sur la base de ces hypothèses, comment devrions-nous évaluer l’impact des nouveaux médias et de la transformation technologique sur les sociétés et les économies africaines? Quels modèles de mobilité sociale et économique contribuent–ils à favoriser? Quelles catégories de personnes et quels intérêts ont bénéficié des changements technologiques et qui sont ceux qui, au contraire, restent en marge de ces transformations?
  • Finalement, si les transformations technologiques décrites plus haut ont contribué à transformer la position des industries audiovisuelles africaines dans le cadre plus large du capitalisme global, elles ont aussi eu un impact sur l’organisation du travail interne à ces mêmes industries. L’augmentation de la compétition commerciale et la formalisation de certain secteurs de la production et de la distribution provoquées par l’arrivée de grandes compagnies internationales, par exemple, ont transformé profondément la manière de concevoir et de mettre en œuvre des formes de collaboration entre professionnels locaux de l’audiovisuel. En même temps, l’introduction de nouvelles technologies a eu un impact important sur la manière d’organiser le travail, en phase de production, ainsi que de pré- et post-production, provoquant l’émergence de nouvelles figures professionnelles et déstabilisant les équilibres qui avaient caractérisé le monde de la production audiovisuelle jusque-là. Quel a donc été l’impact des transformations technologiques et économiques mentionnées plus haut sur la vie et les conditions de travail des producteurs et des distributeurs de médias audiovisuels africains? Comment les dynamiques du capitalisme global se sont-elles reflété à l’échelle micro des interactions quotidiennes entre professionnels du secteur ? Répondre à ces questions nous permettra de saisir « la manière dont le pouvoir opère localement à travers la production médiatique pour reproduire des hiérarchies sociales et des inégalités au niveau des interactions quotidiennes » (Mayer 2009: 15).

Les auteurs intéressés à contribuer à ce numéro spécial sont invités à envoyer un résumé d’une page maximum de leur article et une courte biographie à Alessandro Jedlowski (alessandro.jedlowski@gmail.com) avant le 10 décembre. L’acceptation des papiers sera notifiée avant le 30 décembre et la version finale devra parvenir au comité de rédaction avant le 30 mars. Les contributions ne doivent pas dépasser 8 000 mots / 50 000 caractères. Elles peuvent être écrites en anglais ou en français, mais la langue finale de la publication sera le français.

Bibliographie

Adejunmobi 2015, « Neoliberal Rationalities in Old and New Nollywood. » African Studies Review 58(3): 31-53.

Bakari, Imruh, and Mbye B. Cham, eds. 1996. African Experiences of Cinema. London: British Film Institute.

Barber, Karin. 1987. “Popular arts in Africa.” African Studies Review 30(3): 1-78.

Barber, Karin (ed.) 1997. Readings in African Popular Culture. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Barber, Karin. 2007. The Anthropology of Texts, Persons and Publics: Oral and Written Culture in Africa and Beyond. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Barlet Olivier. 1996. Les cinémas d’Afrique noire: le regard en question. Paris : Editions L’Harmattan.

Bayart, Jean-François. 2000. « Africa in the world: a history of extraversion. » African Affairs 99(395): 217-267.

Bayart, Jean-François, Mbembe Achille and Comi Toulabor. 1992. Le politique par le Bas : contribution à une problématique de la démocratie en Afrique Noire. Paris : Karthala.

Bisschoff, Lizelle, and Ann Overbergh. 2012. “Digital as the new popular in African cinema? Case studies from the continent.” Research in African literatures 43(4): 112-127.

Böhme, Claudia. 2013. “Bloody bricolages: Traces of Nollywood in Tanzanian video films.” In Krings, Matthias and Onookome Okome (eds), Global Nollywood: The Transnational Dimensions of an African Video Film Industry. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 327-346.

Born, Georgina. 2005. Uncertain Vision: Birt, Dyke and the Reinvention of the BBC. London: Vintage.

Caillé, Patricia and Claude Forest (eds.) 2017. Regarder des films en Afriques. Villeneuve d’Asq: Presses universitaires du Septentrion.

Caldwell, John T. 2008. Production Culture: Industrial Reflexivity and Critical Practice in Film and Television. Durham: Duke University Press.

Capitant, Sylvie and Marie-Soleil Frère. 2011. « Les Afriques médiatiques. Introduction thématique ». Afrique contemporaine 240: p. 25-41.

Comaroff, Jean, and John L. Comaroff. 2004. « Notes on Afromodernity and the neo world order: an afterword. » In Weiss, Brad (ed), Producing African futures: Ritual and Reproduction in a Neoliberal Age. Leiden: Brill. 329-348.

Cooper, Frederick. 1987. “Who is the Populist?”, African Studies Review 30(3): 99-104.

David-Ismayil, Meyll ; Dugonjic, Leonora and Romain Lecler. 2015. « Analyser les politiques de mondialisation. » In Siméant, Johanna (ed.) Guide de l’enquete globale en sciences sociales. Paris : CNRS Editions. 47-68.

De Beukelaer, Christiaan. 2015. Developing Cultural Industries: Learning from the Palimpsest of Practice. Brussels: European Cultural Foundation.

Dénommée, Julie. 2018. « On est où là? Dérision et distanciation dans l’analyse des séries télévisées ivoiriennes », Unpublished PhD thesis, Université de Montréal.

Diawara, Manthia. 2010. African Film: New Forms of Aesthetics and Politics. Munich: Prestel.

Dipio, Dominica. 2014. “A historical overview of the Ugandan film industry”. In Ogunleye, Foluke (ed), African Film: Looking Back and Looking Forward. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars. 232-255.

Diawara, Manthia. 1992. African Cinema: Politics and Culture. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Fabian, Johannes. 1978. Moments of Freedom: Anthropology and Popular Culture. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.

Fabian, Johannes. 1990. Power and Performance: Ethnographic Explorations Through Proverbial Wisdom and Theater in Shaba, Zaire. Ann Arbor, MI: Wisconsin University Press.

Frère, Marie-Soleil. 2005. « Médias en mutation : de l’émancipation aux nouvelles contraintes », Politique Africaine 97: p. 5-17.

Frère, Marie-Soleil. 2012. “Introduction: Perspectives on the media in ‘another Africa’ ». Ecquid Novi: African Journalism Studies, 33 (3): 1-12,

Forest, Claude. 2011. « L’industrie du cinéma en Afrique. » Afrique contemporaine 238: 59-73.

Forest, Claude (ed.). 2018. Produire des films. Afriques et Moyen Orient. Villeneuve d’Asq: Presses universitaires du Septentrion.

Ganti, Tejaswini. 2015. “Fuzzy numbers: The productive nature of ambiguity in the Hindi film industry”. Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 35(3): 451-465.

Garritano, Carmela. 2013. African Video Movies and Global Desires: A Ghanaian History. Athens: Ohio University Press.

Guneratne, Anthony; Dissanayake, Wimal (eds). 2003. Rethinking Third Cinema. New York and London: Routledge.

Guyer, Jane. 1996. “Traditions of Invention in Equatorial Africa”. African Studies Review 39(3): 1-28.

Harrow, Kenneth W. 2013. Trash: African Cinema from Below. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Haynes, Jonathan, ed. 2000. Nigerian Video Films. Athens: Ohio University Press.

Haynes, Jonathan. 2006.  “Political critique in Nigerian video films.”  African Affairs 105(421): 511 – 533.

Haynes, Jonathan. 2014. “‘New Nollywood’: Kunle Afolayan.” Black Camera 5(2): 53-73.

Haynes, Jonathan. 2016. Nollywood: The Creation of Nigerian Film Genres. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Himpele, Jeff D. 1996. “Film distribution as media: Mapping difference in the Bolivian cinemascape”. Visual Anthropology Review 12(1): 47-66.

Krings, Matthias. 2015. African Appropriations: Cultural Difference, Mimesis, and Media. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Krings, Matthias, and OnookomeOkome (eds.) 2013. Global Nollywood: The Transnational Dimensions of an African Video Film Industry. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Krings, Matthias and Uta Reuster-Jahn (eds). 2014. Bongo Media Worlds: Producing and Consuming Popular Culture in Dar es Salaam. Cologne: RüdigerKöppeVerlag.

Jedlowski, Alessandro. 2013. “From Nollywood to Nollyworld: Processes of transnationalization in the Nigerian video film industry”. In Krings, Matthias and Onookome Okome (eds), Global Nollywood: Transnational Dimensions of an African Video Film Industry. Indiana University Press, Bloomington. 25-45.

Jedlowski, Alessandro. 2015. “Avenues of participation and strategies of control: Video film production and social mobility in Ethiopia and southern Nigeria”. In Banks, Miranda, Vicky Mayer and Bridget Conor (eds.), Production Studies II, The Sequel. Cultural Studies of Global Media Industries, London: Routledge. 175-186

Jedlowski, Alessandro. 2016. “Studying media ‘from’ the South: African screen media and global perspectives”. Black Camera 7(2): 174-193.

Jedlowski, Alessandro. 2017. “African media and the corporate takeover: Video film circulation in the age of neoliberal transformations”. African Affairs 116(465): 671–691.

Jedlowski, Alessandro. 2018. “African videoscapes: Southern Nigeria, Ethiopia and Côte d’Ivoire in comparative perspective”; in Harrow? Kenneth and Carmela Garritano (eds), Companion to African Cinema. London and New York: Blackwell-Wiley.

Larkin, Brian. 2008. Signal and Noise: Media, Infrastructure, and Urban Culture in Nigeria. Durham: Duke University Press.

Lobato, Ramon. 2012. Shadow Economies of Cinema: Mapping Informal Film Distribution. London: British Film Institute.

Mayer, Vicky. 2009. “Bringing the social back in: Studies of production cultures and social theory”. In Mayer, Vicki, Miranda J. Banks, and John T. Caldwell (eds.), Production Studies: Cultural Studies of Media Industries. London: Routledge. 15-24.

McCall, John. 2007. “The Pan-Africanism we have: Nollywood’s invention of Africa.” Film International 28(5.4): 92- 97.

McChesney, Robert W. 2013. Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism is Turning the Internet Against Democracy. New York: The New Press.

Meyer, Birgit. 2015. Sensational Movies: Video, Vision, and Christianity in Ghana. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Newell, Stephanie, and Onookome Okome, eds. 2013. Popular Culture in Africa: The Episteme of the Everyday. London: Routledge.

Ortner, Sherry B. 2009. “Studying sideways: Ethnographic access in Hollywood”. In Mayer, Vicki, Miranda J. Banks, and John T. Caldwell (eds.), Production Studies: Cultural Studies of Media Industries. London: Routledge. 175-189.

Ortner, Sherry B. 2013. Not Hollywood: Independent Film at the Twilight of the American Dream. Durham: Duke University Press.

Overbergh, Ann. 2015. « Kenya’s riverwood: Market structure, power relations, and future outlooks. » Journal of African Cinemas 7(2): 97-115.

Peterson, Mark Allen. 2003. Anthropology and Mass Communication: Media and Myth in the New Millennium. Vol. 2. Oxford: Berghahn Books.

Pype, Katrien. 2012. The Making of the Pentecostal Melodrama: Religion, Media and Gender in Kinshasa. Oxford: Berghahn Books.

Ryan Connor. 2015. “New Nollywood: A sketch of Nollywood’s metropolitan new style”. African Studies Review 58(3): 55–76.

Santanera, Giovanna. 2015. “Douala si mette in scena: Nuove esperienze video in Cameroun”. Unpublished PhD Thesis, University of Milan Bicocca/EHESS.

Saul, Mahir, and Ralph A. Austen (eds.). Viewing African Cinema in the Twenty-first Century: Art Films and the Nollywood Video Revolution. Athens: Ohio University Press.

Tcheuyap, Alexie. 2011. Postnationalist African Cinemas. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Thomas Michael W., Alessandro Jedlowski and AbonehAshagrie. 2018. Cine-Ethiopia: The History and Politics of Film in the Horn of Africa. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University Press.

Ukadike, Frank Nwachukwu. 1994. Black African Cinema. Berkeley: University of California Press

UNDP & UNESCO. 2013. Creative Economy Report 2013, Special Edition. New York and Paris: United Nations Development Program and UNESCO.

[1] A similar argument could be formulated in relation to African news media industries. However these industries make the object of a different stream of academic literature (see for instance Frère 2005; Capitant and Frère 2011; Frère 2012) whose discussion is beyond the scope of this issue.

[2] It must be underlined that most of the scholarship on these new screen media industries has been published in English and focused on case studies drawn from English-speaking countries (such as Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya and Tanzania). However, a growing number of recent publications is contributing in breaking the gap existing between Anglophone and Francophone scholarship on African screen media, thus also diversifying the range of theoretical approaches adopted to analyse these phenomena. See for instance Diawara (2010), Saul and Austen (2010), Tcheuyap (2011), Harrow (2013), Caillé and Forest (2017) and Forest (2018).

[3] Un argument similaire pourrait être formulé en relation aux industries africaines des médias d’information. Cependant, ces industries font l’objet d’une littérature différente (voir par exemple Frère 2005; Capitant et Frère 2011; Frère 2012) dont l’analyse va au-delà du cadre de la discussion menée dans ce numéro de Politique Africaine.

[4] Il convient de souligner que la majeure partie des études sur ces nouvelles industries des médias a été publiée en anglais et a porté sur des études de cas réalisées dans des pays anglophones (tels que le Nigéria, le Ghana, le Kenya et la Tanzanie). Cependant, un nombre important de publications récentes a contribué à rapprocher les études anglophones et francophones sur les médias africains, diversifiant ainsi également l’éventail des approches théoriques adoptées pour analyser ces phénomènes. Voir par exemple Diawara (2010), Saul et Austen (2010), Tcheuyap (2011), Harrow (2013), Caillé et Forest (2017) et Forest (2018).

Politiser le domestique. Regards socio-historiques sur les domesticités en Afrique

Dossier coordonné par Mélanie Jacquemin, sociologue à l’IRD (UMR 151 LPED, AMU/IRD) et Violaine Tisseau, historienne au CNRS (UMR 8171 IMAf, AMU/CNRS/EHESS/IRD/EPHE/Paris 1).

Présentation du dossier

Cette proposition de dossier part d’un constat sur un champ de recherches et de publications pour le moins fragmentaire : dans la littérature sur le travail en Afrique, celui qui s’exerce dans la sphère privée reste encore étudié de manière résiduelle. C’est une invitation à explorer davantage la manière dont s’est constitué un marché du service domestique dans des sociétés gagnées par la modernité et des formes nouvelles de régulations juridiques, alors même que persistent souvent, dans la domesticité, des relations hiérarchisées de type traditionnel, encensées par le langage de la parenté. Ce dernier dilue généralement la notion de travail (valeur et rapport social) et entretient la porosité entre travail/emploi domestique pour le compte d’autrui et tâches ménagères non déléguées. Associé au caractère trivial de l’occupation, le statut de « cadets sociaux » des domestiques met encore en questions la participation de ces catégories de travailleurs à la citoyenneté sociale et économique des pays, qui leur serait parfois refusée au motif que le travail dans la maison est figé dans l’ordre des sentiments et du domaine privé, tandis que rationalité et reconnaissance publique restent jugées propres au travail qui s’accomplit hors de la sphère domestique.

Contexte et problématique

Parce qu’il s’exerce dans un cadre privé, le travail domestique a pour spécificité d’être le plus souvent perçu comme improductif, d’échapper aux systèmes de comptabilité économique ainsi qu’à la régulation de l’État. Il existe cependant des formes plurielles d’emploi ou de service domestique (formel/informel/salarié/rétribué en nature/comptabilisé ou non, etc.) ; avec l’objectif de prendre en considération et de décrypter cette diversité aux contours parfois fondus, c’est ici une acception large que nous retenons, avec pour critère minimal l’actualisation d’une « mise au travail » (Lautier, 1998). Reconsidérer cette activité comme travail permet d’y introduire la question du politique. À la fois parce qu’il s’y révèle comme pour n’importe quel autre espace de travail ; mais aussi parce que s’intéresser aux diverses conditions et modalités du service domestique, à ses modes de régulation (privés, communautaires, étatiques, intermédiaires), aux formes de résistance voire de protestation des domestiques (des plus discrètes aux plus ouvertes) – permet d’apporter un autre éclairage à la constitution de la citoyenneté et la construction d’un État.

En privilégiant les approches empiriques, nous souhaitons ici souligner l’importance des contextes – politiques, sociaux, économiques, historiques – et rassembler des articles s’intéressant à différents espaces et temps : les conditions du service domestique, la manière dont le mécontentement peut se nouer, les possibilités de protestation ne sont pas les mêmes selon que l’on est pendant la période coloniale, sous l’apartheid, ou pendant des moments de lutte pour les indépendances par exemple, ou encore selon que l’on est en période de croissance ou de crise économique, etc. Tandis que nombre de travailleuses et travailleurs domestiques sont rendus invisibles par un refus voire un déni de (re)connaissance (Jacquemin, 2009), leurs mobilisations, pour être rares et emprunter des formes plurielles, sont-elles vouées à rester invisibles ? Non, sans aucun doute et Dominique Vidal (2007), analysant la situation des employées domestiques à Rio a montré de manière convaincante comment ces dernières sont au cœur même de la démocratie brésilienne.

Ce dossier invite aussi à considérer un contexte international nouveau, né de l’adoption d’outils normatifs portés par des agences onusiennes, et à s’interroger sur ses traductions. En juin 2011, l’Organisation Internationale du Travail a adopté la Convention n°189, encourageant les États à réglementer l’emploi domestique pour « étendre les droits fondamentaux du travail aux travailleurs domestiques dans le monde entier »[1].

Pour les plus jeunes travailleurs (parmi lesquels nombre de « petites bonnes » en Afrique), la ratification des conventions 138 et 182 de l’OIT relatives au travail des enfants tend à se généraliser dans les États africains, qui ont par ailleurs tous ratifié la Convention Internationale des Droits de l’Enfant, adoptée à l’ONU en 1989. En parallèle, des ONG et des associations ont multiplié leurs programmes en matière de protection de l’enfance ; alors que la ligne abolitionniste dominante entre parfois en tension avec certaines pratiques ou « revendications » des enfants travailleurs, certaines organisations sous la bannière du Mouvement Africain des Enfants et Jeunes Travailleurs ont en commun de donner voix à des travailleurs et travailleuses domestiques particulièrement déconsidérés par la société, et souvent oubliés dans le champ académique.

Objectifs

Tandis que la plupart des travaux actuels sur les « domestiques » s’inscrivent dans une approche globalisée de l’économie qui relie cette question à l’essor des migrations féminines Sud-Nord, ce dossier veut porter l’attention sur les domesticités africaines d’hier à aujourd’hui qui, malgré une composante migratoire forte à l’échelle interne ou intra-africaine et des mutations remarquables, sont restées dans l’ombre de transformations plus spectaculaires vues du Nord, comme celles liées aux migrations internationales ou au phénomène de traite des femmes et des enfants. À partir de nos travaux à sensibilités historienne et socio-ethnographique sur « le » domestique en Afrique, nous soutenons pour ce dossier l’intérêt d’étendre l’exploration des formes plurielles du service domestique en Afrique, ne serait-ce que pour donner continuité, via la question de la domesticité, au projet de « reconnecter les réflexions sur le lien entre ordre politique et ordre social, afin d’être capable de rendre compte de façon non culturaliste des façons par lesquelles il est possible et pensable de se faire entendre » (Siméant, 2013 : 141).

En interrogeant l’évolution des rapports de travail (passage de logiques familiales à des relations contractuelles de type salariale, spécialisation des tâches, formes de recrutement, liens de dépendance en continuité avec l’esclavage, prégnance des relations paternalistes, …), en analysant les relations quotidiennes au sein des maisonnées en termes de genre, de classe, de « race » ou d’âge, et comment celles-ci sont incarnées et transcrites dans les pratiques ou les discours voire dans l’espace, ou encore en décrivant les moyens qu’ont – ou n’ont pas – les domestiques de résister à la domination, nous voulons examiner la portée économique, politique et symbolique des changements à l’œuvre dans des contextes sociaux diversifiés, repérer au contraire des invariants et ce qu’ils disent, ou encore distinguer ce qui ressortirait de spécificités africaines, notamment relatives aux rapports de genre.

Envisagée comme outil transversal d’analyse, la perspective de genre est fortement invitée dans ce dossier : si l’ensemble des travaux montrent que le service domestique est, partout, socialement construit comme fonction subalterne définie en termes de genre, l’étude des domesticités en Afrique dans ses variations et ses évolutions est particulièrement fertile pour analyser les transformations potentielles des rapports de genre dominants – remise en cause ou consolidation. Centrale dans l’analyse des inégalités femmes/hommes en raison de sa composante majoritairement féminine, la domesticité en Afrique se décline parfois et jusqu’aujourd’hui spécifiquement au masculin (que l’on pense par exemple aux « boys » burkinabé d’Abidjan ou aux « ababuyi » de Bujumbura), nous invitant à examiner l’imbrication des différents rapports de domination.

Trois axes principaux pourront être explorés (mais d’autres entrées pourront être associées) :

  • Décrire, reconnaître, compter les domesticités en Afrique

Ce premier axe entend décrire les différentes formes du service domestique en Afrique, en variant les espaces mais aussi les moments. Il s’attachera à montrer la diversité et la pluralité des statuts d’emploi, des employeurs, des conditions et des situations de travail, etc.

Lorsqu’ils cherchent à typologiser le travail domestique, les chercheur.e.s sont confrontés à des difficultés de vocabulaire. En effet, la diversité des conditions n’est pas prise en compte par la terminologie ordinaire francophone (et anglophone). Les termes vernaculaires seront ainsi à étudier : à Madagascar par exemple, on observe un glissement de l’emploi du terme de boto (homme à tout faire, domestique) vers celui de mpanampy (celui qui aide).

S’ajoute une spécificité partagée par de nombreuses sociétés du continent africain, à savoir l’existence – passée ou encore actuelle – du statut (de descendant) d’esclave[2], mais aussi des pratiques de circulation (« confiage ») des enfants, qui maintiennent les individus dans des situations de dépendance voire de servitude (Jacquemin, 2000). La colonisation, en abolissant l’esclavage, n’a pas pour autant supprimé le statut social d’esclave et de descendant d’esclave et a laissé hors de toute régulation les emplois domestiques (Haskins, 2015). Le travail domestique est en effet souvent réalisé par des personnes exposées à diverses formes de vulnérabilité dans un contexte social donné, leur statut de travailleur n’étant pas toujours reconnu comme tel. Âge, sexe, origine géographique et sociale des domestiques seront ainsi des variables à prendre en compte ; on observe parfois des changements radicaux dans les main-d’œuvre employées : si Karen Hansen (1989) souligne que les domestiques étaient majoritairement des hommes en Zambie, à l’inverse, des années plus tard, ce sont des femmes qui exercent ces emplois (Hepburn, 2016).

  • Pluralité des normes

Ce deuxième axe veut aborder la question de la régulation du service domestique pour documenter la diversité des modalités de sa mise en œuvre : par l’Etat, par des « communautés » (familles, lignages, paroisses), par des acteurs privés (agences de placement, …) ou associatifs, etc. Il introduit la question de la pluralité des normes et de leurs dynamiques (Chauveau et al., 2001), envisagée au prisme des pratiques variées de service domestique, de la co-existence de normes formelles et informelles à diverses échelles et partant de « sources variées de légitimité ».

La formalisation plus ou moins grande du service domestique constituera ainsi un point à explorer, en lien avec l’encadrement progressif du travail par les États et la mise en place des systèmes de protection sociale : les domestiques cotisent-ils/elles par exemple pour une sécurité sociale ou des retraites ? Sont-ils/elles enregistrés dans les comptabilités nationales ? On pourra y adjoindre une réflexion sur la contractualisation du travail au cours du temps.

Continue de se poser plus ou moins explicitement la question de la reconnaissance économique du travail domestique qui, acquise de haute lutte dans plusieurs pays (Ibos, 2016), reste très incomplète en Afrique : on pourra en outre tenter d’en comprendre plus précisément le jeu des blocages ou des progressions selon les contextes socio-politiques. S’intéressant à l’implication des femmes domestiques dans la négociation de la Convention 189 de l’OIT sur le « Travail décent pour les travailleuses et travailleurs domestiques », Helen Schwenken rappelle ainsi que « la condition sine qua non à la mobilisation est la visibilité de ces femmes en tant que ‘travailleuses’ — et non en tant que ‘bonnes’ ou ‘servantes’ — ainsi que la reconnaissance du ménage privé comme lieu de travail » (Schwenken, 2011 : 114).

  • Mobiliser : acteurs/actrices et répertoires d’action

Avec l’objectif de mettre en questions les représentations de l’éternel consentement des domestiques, nous invitons aussi les auteur.e.s à explorer la notion d’économie morale à travers les expressions et les positions des travailleurs domestiques. Comme le suggère Johanna Siméant, il s’agit en particulier de s’interroger sur les manières de saisir les « formes latérales de dissentiment » (2013 : 136) et de « discerner l’expression du dissentiment dans ce qui ne propose pas forcément de programme politique articulé » (Siméant, 2010 : 150) : la question de la reproduction des positions sociales, du rapport à l’État et de l’expression du mécontentement sont alors centrales et leurs imbrications à approfondir.

Certes la domesticité ne saurait être abordée comme un bassin spécifique de militantisme, mais elle ne saurait non plus être soustraite totalement au champ des études sur l’action collective et les mobilisations, même si ces dernières prennent (ou prenaient) des formes d’expression et des moyens d’action différents et non habituels dans l’espace des mobilisations urbaines et ouvrières en Afrique, désormais bien documenté à travers la sociologie des mouvements sociaux qui s’est déployée sur le continent africain depuis une vingtaine d’années (Siméant, 2013 ; Tall et al., 2015).

À travers une micro-ethnographie des conflits ou une analyse plus classique des mouvements institutionnalisés, ce dernier axe veut interroger les registres possibles de mobilisation – individuelle (évitement, résistance à la routine, vol, action en justice, etc.) voire implicite, ou collective et publique (syndicats, associations, etc.) – que cette catégorie plurielle de travailleurs peut élaborer, dans une perspective à la fois historique, sociologique et anthropologique et dans des contextes variés. Quelles corrélations existe-t-il entre les transformations d’un groupe social et sa propension plus ou moins grande à se mobiliser ? Comment passe-t-on d’une résistance qui ne modifie pas les structures, à une action plus large qui sort proprement du cas individuel et de l’espace privé ? Dans le prolongement du dossier de Politique Africaine consacré au post-esclavage et aux mobilisations collectives (n°140, 2015/4), nous nous intéresserons ici aux mobilisations fondées sur la revendication d’un statut commun de travailleur : quels liens peut-il exister avec celles organisées autour d’une ascendance partagée (descendants d’esclaves) et avec des formes d’extraversion des luttes ? Dans quelles conditions passe-t-on de la reconnaissance sociale de l’activité de groupes subalternes – en l’occurrence des travailleurs domestiques – à une normalisation de leur participation à la citoyenneté et à la vie politique ?

Les propositions d’articles inédits (1 page) pourront être envoyées en français ou en anglais aux coordinatrices du dossier jusqu’au 4 décembre 2018.

melanie.jacquemin@ird.fr, violaine.tisseau@gmail.com

Calendrier

4 déc. 2018 : date limite d’envoi des propositions d’article (1 page max) aux coordinatrices du dossier

14 déc. 2018 : notification aux auteur.e.s des propositions retenues

15 mars 2019 : date limite d’envoi des articles (50 000 signes, espaces et notes compris) au comité de rédaction de la revue

Été 2019 : publication du dossier.

Références citées

Chauveau Jean-Pierre, Le Pape Marc, Olivier de Sardan Jean-Pierre, 2001, « La pluralité des normes et leurs dynamiques en Afrique : implications pour les politiques publiques », In : Winter Gérard (coord.). Inégalités et politiques publiques en Afrique : pluralité des normes et jeux d’acteurs, Paris : IRD/Karthala, p. 145-162.

Hansen Tranberg Karen, 1989, Distant Companions: Servants and Employers in Zambia, 1900-1985, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Haskins Victoria, 2015, Colonization and Domestic Service. Historical and Contemporary Perspectives, Oxford: Routledge.

Hepburn Sacha, 2016, “’Bringing a Girl from the Village: Gender, Child Migration and Domestic Service in Post-Colonial Zambia’, in Marie Rodet and Elodie Razy (eds), Children on the Move in Africa: Past and Present Experiences of Migration, Woodbridge: James Currey, p. 69-84.

Ibos Caroline, 2016, « Travail domestique/domesticité », Encyclopédie critique du genre. Corps, sexualité, rapports sociaux, Paris : La Découverte, p. 649-658.

Jacquemin Mélanie, 2000, « ‘Petites nièces’ et petites bonnes, le travail des fillettes en milieu urbain de Côte-d’Ivoire », Journal des Africanistes, 70 (1-2), p. 105-122.

Jacquemin Mélanie, 2009. “Invisible Young Female Migrant Workers: ‘Little Domestics’ in West Africa – Comparative Perspectives on Girls and Young Women’s Work”, Working Paper – Development Research Centre on Migration, Globalisation and Poverty/ University of Sussex, and Centre for Migration Studies/ University of Ghana, Accra. http://horizon.documentation.ird.fr/exl-doc/pleins_textes/divers16-06/010067209.pdf

Lautier Bruno, 1998. « Pour une sociologie de l’hétérogénéité du travail », Tiers-Monde, tome 39, n°154, p. 251-279.

Schwenken Helen, 2011. « Mobilisation des travailleuses domestiques migrantes : de la cuisine à l’Organisation internationale du travail », Cahiers du Genre 2/2011, 51, p. 113-133.

Siméant Johanna, 2010, « Économie morale » et protestation – détours africains », Genèses, 2010, 4, n° 81, p. 142-160.

Siméant Johanna, 2013, « Protester / mobiliser / ne pas consentir. Sur quelques avatars de la sociologie des mobilisations appliquée au continent africain », Revue internationale de politique comparée, 2013, 2, vol. 20, p. 125-143.

Tall Kadya, Pommerolle Marie-Emmanuelle, Cahen Michel, 2015, Collective Mobilisations in Africa / Mobilisations collectives en Afrique, Leiden : Brill.

Vidal Dominique, 2007, Les bonnes de Rio. Emploi domestique et société démocratique au Brésil, Villeneuve d’Ascq : Presses Universitaires du Septentrion.

[1] Convention n° 189 et Recommandation n°201 de l’OIT, sur le travail décent dans l’emploi domestique. Entrée en vigueur en septembre 2013, cette convention n’a été à ce jour ratifiée que par 25 pays ; sur le continent africain, seules l’Afrique du Sud et la Guinée comptent parmi eux ; au Sénégal par exemple, malgré des campagnes syndicales menées depuis 2011 et inscrites dans l’initiative internationale « 12 ratifications en 2012 », le gouvernement a laissé ce dossier en suspens.

[2] Sur ce point, le dossier ici proposé peut être envisagé comme un prolongement du dossier n° 140 de Politique Africaine (« La question de l’esclavage en Afrique : Politisation et mobilisations »), dont aucun texte n’abordait en particulier la question de la domesticité.

Call for proposals: Health Matters in Africa. Interventions, Actors, Dynamics in the Era of Global Health

Coordinators: Fred Eboko, sociologist and political scientist, Research Director IRD (UMR 196 CEPED – Université Paris Descartes – IRD, fred.eboko@ird.fr) et Carine Baxerres, anthropologist, Senior Researcher l’IRD (UMR 216 MERIT – Université Paris Descartes – IRD, Centre Norbert Elias, carine.baxerres@ird.fr).

The last issue of Politique africaine to deal with the subject of health was published in December 1987.1  The goal of the present issue is to address what has occurred in the intervening thirty years and to highlight significant changes the public health sector has undergone in recent years.

Continuer la lecture de Call for proposals: Health Matters in Africa. Interventions, Actors, Dynamics in the Era of Global Health

  1. Didier Fassin ed., Politiques de santé, Politique africaine 28 (1987). []

Appel à contribution : L’Afrique en santé. Interventions, acteurs et dynamiques à l’ère de la « Global Health »

Dossier coordonné par Fred Eboko, sociologue et politiste, Directeur de Recherche  à l’IRD (UMR 196 CEPED – Université Paris Descartes – IRD, fred.eboko@ird.fr) et Carine Baxerres, anthropologue, Chargée de recherche à l’IRD (UMR 216 MERIT – Université Paris Descartes – IRD, Centre Norbert Elias, carine.baxerres@ird.fr)

Le dernier numéro de Politique africaine sur la santé date de décembre 19871. Cette proposition de dossier vise à combler un vide de près de 30 ans et à rendre compte des changements considérables qu’a connu récemment l’univers de la santé publique en Afrique.

Continuer la lecture de Appel à contribution : L’Afrique en santé. Interventions, acteurs et dynamiques à l’ère de la « Global Health »

  1. Didier Fassin, (sous la direction de), Politiques de santé, Politique africaine, n°28, décembre, 1987. []

CFP_Taxation, formality and informality in contemporary Africa

Call for Papers

 Taxation, formality and informality in contemporary Africa

 Special issue coordinated by Olly Owen
(Research Fellow, Oxford Department of International Development)

 This call for papers invites submissions from anyone working on taxation in revenue in Africa in ways which deals either directly or indirectly with the duality of formal and informal actors, institutions and practices. In recent years, many African states have redirected their attention to reforming and maximising internal revenue, especially as global natural resource prices and global aid flows become increasingly unpredictable. This move has been followed by increased donor support for such programmes, and a renewal of scholarly attention to the issues these developments bring out. Continuer la lecture de CFP_Taxation, formality and informality in contemporary Africa

AAC Fiscalité en Afrique contemporaine: formalités et informalités

Appel à contribution

Fiscalité en Afrique contemporaine: formalités et informalités

 Coordonné par Olly Owen
(Chargé de recherche, Oxford Department of International Development)

 Cet appel à contribution souhaite recueillir les propositions d’auteurs s’intéressant aux politiques fiscales des États africains et qui abordent dans leurs travaux, de manière directe ou indirecte, la dualité du formel et de l’informel au niveau des acteurs, des institutions ou des pratiques en matière de fiscalité. Au cours des dernières années, de nombreux États africains ont orienté leurs efforts dans le sens d’une réforme et d’une maximisation des recettes fiscales, pour faire face en particulier à l’imprévisibilité croissante des prix des ressources naturelles sur les marchés mondiaux et des flux de l’aide internationale. Cette initiative a été soutenue par une aide accrue des bailleurs en faveur de tels programmes. Elle a également renouvelé l’attention des chercheurs vis-à-vis de ces développements et des enjeux qui leur sont associés. Continuer la lecture de AAC Fiscalité en Afrique contemporaine: formalités et informalités

Cameroun : l’État stationnaire

Cameroun : l’État stationnaire

Dossier coordonné par

Fred Eboko & Patrick Awondo

Cliquez ici pour ouvrir le lien en pdf :

PolitiqueAfricaine_AAC_Cameroun_Etat stationnaire

En 1986, Politique africaine consacrait un dossier au « réveil du Cameroun » et analysait les conséquences de la crise politique de 1984 résultant d’une tentative de coup d’État contre Paul Biya qui était alors un jeune président (Bayart, 1986). Une décennie plus tard, en 1996, la même revue réfléchissait aux effets de la « démocratisation » qui avait plongé le Cameroun dans un « entre-deux » (Sindjoun et Courade, 1996). Le dossier mettait au jour les « cicatrices » et les lignes de fractures d’un pays aux milles tensions et dont une partie de la mémoire coloniale « en errance » (Mbembé, 1996) à travers la question anglophone, hantait le présent. Continuer la lecture de Cameroun : l’État stationnaire

Cameroon: the stationary State

Cameroon: the stationary State

Guest editors:

Fred Eboko & Patrick Awondo

PolitiqueAfricaine_CFP_Cameroon_Stationary state

In 1986, Politique africaine dedicated a dossier to the “awakening of Cameroon” and analysed the consequences of the 1984 political crisis in the aftermath of a coup attempt against the then young President Paul Biya (Bayart, 1986). A decade later, in 1996, the same journal pondered on the effects of “democratisation” that had plunged Cameroon into a « no man’s land » (Sindjoun and Courade, 1996). The dossier threw light on the « scars » and broken lines in a country rife with tensions, and where part of the « unfinished business » in the colonial years (Mbembé, 1996), through the Anglophone question, was still interfering with the present. Continuer la lecture de Cameroon: the stationary State

AAC_Penser les radicalisations religieuses – CFP Rethinking religious radicalisation in Africa

 

« Penser les radicalisations religieuses en Afrique »

coordonné par Roland Marchal (CNRS, Ceri-Sciences-Po)

et Zekeria Ould Ahmed Salem (Université de Nouakchott)

(English version follows)

Il n’allait nullement de soi de proposer un dossier à Politique africaine sur les radicalisations religieuses dans un contexte où le monde académique, les médias et les politiques publiques s’en sont déjà largement saisis. Pourtant, c’est justement cette profusion actuelle de discours et de recherches qui constitue le point de départ de ce dossier. Son questionnement porte sur la manière dont la notion de radicalisation, en l’occurrence en Afrique, est abordée dans le champ des sciences sociales

L’expansion de ce qu’on appelle « terrorisme islamiste » a en effet polarisé le débat public sur « la radicalisation » (Neumann, 2013) et ses dimensions politiques, sociales et sécuritaires (Khorsokhavar, 2014 ; Kepel, 2015). Désormais, le sens de cette notion, familière aux spécialistes de la sociologie politique (Collovald et Gaiti, 2006), s’est modifié et a transformé les enjeux de ses usages dans l’après 11 septembre 2001 (Crettiez, 2006).

Or, dans la période récente, on s’est moins préoccupé de produire des connaissances nouvelles sur le sujet que de s’imposer dans le champ académique et médiatique pour obtenir une reconnaissance politique et scientifique[1]. Les ressources générées par les programmes de contre-radicalisation lancés par les gouvernements et les organisations internationales (les fameux CVE : Countering Violent Extremism) ont paradoxalement conduit à un usage non critique des notions de « radicalisation » et de « radicalisme », y compris par les sciences sociales. Ainsi, en France, l’initiative Athena d’étude de la radicalisation lancée sous le leadership du CNRS a été présentée comme une occasion de combiner à l’enseignement et à la recherche – vocation classique des organismes impliqués dans ce programme – une sorte de « community service » à l’américaine par lequel les sciences sociales françaises pourraient « se rendre enfin utiles » (Athena, 2016) en contribuant à la lutte contre « la radicalisation ». Le resserrement des liens entre recherche et pratique n’est pas sans poser problème en termes d’autonomie de la pensée scientifique, d’une part, mais aussi vis-à-vis de la manière dont celle-ci concourt, en retour, à construire des problèmes jugés prioritaires dans l’espace public.

Or, il revient précisément aux sciences sociales de s’interroger sur le sens et le degré d’adéquation de cette terminologie avec les phénomènes sociaux qu’elle vise à subsumer. Par exemple, faut-il traiter ensemble les phénomènes de violence et les dynamiques circonscrites au champ religieux ou cultuel ? Faut-il se référer aux catégories émiques ou produire une catégorie générique d’analyse même si les acteurs ne se reconnaissent pas nécessairement dans cette dernière ? Comment peut-on échapper à la « surinterprétation religieuse » des phénomènes politiques sans négliger le phénomène de justification religieuse des violences (Brigaglia, 2015) ?

Le présent dossier cherche à explorer la radicalisation et le radicalisme en Afrique sous la triple forme de la catégorie intellectuelle, de la politique publique et du processus socioreligieux, ainsi qu’à partir des articulations entre ces différents registres. Nous proposons d’aborder la « radicalisation » à travers la manière dont elle se déploie sur le plan social et religieux, structure le débat public, fonde des programmes politiques et exprime des changements sociaux, politiques et religieux, voire affecte la nature de l’État ou les relations internationales des pays africains. L’objectif est d’aborder cette thématique, dans le contexte de l’Afrique, à partir, et surtout au-delà, des études du terrorisme ou du seul cas du djihadisme. Nous faisons l’hypothèse que l’on ne peut pas étudier la radicalisation islamique sans ce jeu de miroir avec les autres formes de radicalisations non-islamiques, voire de co-radicalisations (Pratt, 2015) dans un contexte où, par exemple, des radicalismes violents anti-musulmans (tels les mouvements anti-Balaka en République centrafricaine) sont inspirés par des églises du Réveil. Il reste entendu que les fondamentalismes de toutes les religions apparaissent souvent comme des « ennemis complémentaires » (Bayart, 2016). Débouchent-ils pour autant nécessairement sur des violences armées ? Nous voudrions dans tous les cas interroger les écarts entre qualification et réalité empirique en explorant, par exemple, différents qualificatifs locaux : par exemple, pourquoi, au Nigeria, évoque-t-on Boko Haram comme une « secte » ? En général, on doit prendre la mesure de la difficulté à adosser la réflexion sur ce sujet à un travail de terrain dans les contextes marqués par « la menace terroriste » ou les « guerres civiles », en adaptant souvent nos stratégies de recherche (Barkindo, 2016).

L’Afrique a été largement absente de la réflexion récente et du débat public tenu ailleurs, par exemple, sur « le radicalisme islamique » alors qu’elle fournit un cadre analytique d’autant plus pertinent que la France et ses alliés interviennent militairement au nord comme au sud du Sahara au nom de la lutte contre la radicalisation djihadiste. De l’autre, les discours mi-politiques mi-scientifiques sur la radicalisation ont (comme d’ailleurs l’usage des termes indéfinis de « terrorisme » ou d’« extrémisme ») (Sanson et al., 2012) des effets locaux significatifs, au point, d’ailleurs, que certains s’interrogent sur une radicalisation concomitante des États ou de fractions de la société, hostiles à l’Islam ou aux communautés musulmanes[2]. De même, les interventions internationales au Sahel, la mobilisation des pays du bassin du Lac Tchad contre Boko Haram ou la longue guerre contre l’Organisation des jeunes combattants (Shabaab) en Somalie soulignent l’ancrage d’une radicalité proclamée « islamique » par les groupes ou des individus armés.

Or, si l’Afrique a plutôt été mise à distance dans la prise en compte politico-scientifique de la « radicalisation », en particulier « islamiste », c’est sans doute pour deux raisons bien discutables, au-delà du fait que ce terme est d’abord associé à l’analyse des « homegrown terrorists » en Occident. La première tient à la pérennité d’une certaine vision culturaliste de l’Afrique sub-saharienne liée par exemple à la vieille idée d’un « islam noir » pacifiste (Sanneh, 2016) qui serait rétif à toute radicalisation doctrinale et à toute transformation violente[3]. Nous savons trop combien une telle vision est teintée d’idéologie et dépourvue de bases historiques sérieuses. La seconde raison, corollaire de la précédente, est celle de la supposée extranéité en Afrique du salafisme djihadiste, entendu ici comme le cadre idéologique permettant de justifier la violence, de l’organiser ou d’en fournir les mots d’ordre et les cibles (Ostebo, 2015b). Pourtant, l’expansion à certaines parties du continent d’un islam littéraliste ne peut s’analyser en faisant fi d’une histoire locale dont les révolutions religieuses font partie (Robinson, 2000 ; 2010 ; Searing, 2001), et d’une insertion spécifique de l’Afrique dans des dynamiques de la globalisation des idéologies politiques et religieuses (Ould Ahmed Salem, 2011 ; 2013). Cela avait d’ailleurs été démontré par les travaux antérieurs consacrés non seulement au sempiternel débat entre réforme et tradition (Kaba, 1974 ; Kobo, 2009) mais aussi à « l’islamisme en Afrique » (Kane et Triaud, 1993) et même à la « radicalisation islamique en Afrique » (Otayek et al., 1993).

Pour autant, si le radicalisme islamique est dominant dans la période récente, il serait erroné d’y voir le seul champ concerné ni même de limiter au champ religieux les effets politiques de la radicalisation. Quelles autres formes de radicalisations seraient en cours au sein ou autour d’autres religions pratiquées en Afrique et leur degré de politisation éventuelle ? Quel est le rapport entre les différentes formes de radicalisation religieuse sur le continent ? L’actualité tend à faire oublier combien des régimes politiques en Afrique, pour mieux saisir les opportunités internationales liées à la guerre mondiale contre le terrorisme, ont considérablement durci leur attitude vis-à-vis de communautés musulmanes. On se rend compte également que des clivages sociaux se sont reconfigurés en affrontements entre communautés religieuses sous l’effet de ces discours ou d’autres acteurs religieux dont on a sous-estimé le rôle comme les Églises du Réveil, évangéliques ou pentecôtistes.

Le dossier cherche de façon particulière à s’appuyer sur des cas d’études africains afin de répondre à des questions plus générales : quelle est la part du religieux, du politique et du social dans les processus dits de radicalisation religieuse et de leur dérive violente ? Comment la radicalisation religieuse réelle ou perçue affecte-t-elle la vie politique, les rapports sociaux, et les modes de gouvernance, dans le contexte de la « guerre mondiale contre le terrorisme » et des projets de dé-radicalisation ? Quels sont les rapports entre les mouvements de renouveau religieux et d’autres dynamiques relatives aux débats intergénérationnels, au rôle des élites, à la réforme néo-libérale des économies du continent, aux luttes sociales et aux relations transnationales avec l’Occident et le monde musulman ? En quoi les recherches sur le terrorisme ou la radicalisation ainsi que l’offre de consultance sur ce sujet modifient ou affectent la recherche sur d’autres objets comme la formation de l’État, l’économie politique, les inégalités ou le changement social ?

Si l’objectif n’est pas de cartographier la radicalisation religieuse sur le continent, ni de produire des analyses géopolitiques de l’avancée de l’extrémisme au Sud du Sahara, il est nécessaire que les auteurs potentiels puissent se prévaloir d’un usage du terme de radicalisation adossé à une connaissance assumée et explicite des enjeux attachés à cette notion. Autrement dit, la discussion par les contributeurs de la terminologie dans le cadre de leurs terrains respectifs est indispensable pour éviter de reprendre simplement une catégorie du discours politique. Cela permettra de préciser en quoi des réalités très différentes peuvent se retrouver derrière cette notion de radicalisation et donc de se confronter à la difficulté de la constituer en objet.

En s’efforçant de tenir compte de la perspective générale ainsi dessinée, les contributions pourraient s’articuler autour des trois axes suivants :

  1. Radicalisations et contre-radicalisations religieuses

Il convient ici d’expliquer comment la montée du rigorisme religieux s’oppose concrètement, dans certains contextes, à une tradition plus modérée et comment des acteurs locaux et nationaux aux motivations diverses cherchent à proposer une contre-radicalisation selon des modalités et des formes n’entrant pas toujours dans les cadres étatiques nationaux ou internationaux de la « dé-radicalisation institutionnelle ». L’approche a déjà été adoptée pour le cas du Nigeria (Anonyme, 2012). Il a aussi été démontré qu’à un niveau micro-local, la confrontation entre salafistes et traditionnalistes musulmans ne porte le plus souvent ni sur la politique ni sur la violence mais sur la valeur sociale du savoir religieux par exemple (Becker, 2006). Le salafisme dans nombre de pays n’a guère pris des formes violentes, même quand il a transformé le paysage religieux au point que l’on a pu parler d’un « salafisme africain » (Ostebo, 2015), y compris à un niveau parfois très localisé (Becker, 2006 ; Ostebo, 2012). Dans le même temps, la « guerre spirituelle » est devenue un slogan et une pratique chez nombre de pentecôtistes globalisés (Marshall, 2016).

En explorant cette thématique de la radicalisation sur le continent africain, le dossier entend indiquer combien c’est la sphère religieuse toute entière et ses rapports à l’Etat qui se sont transformés de façon continue suivant des lignes de force qui obéissent autant à des facteurs sociaux internes qu’à un certain état de la globalisation et des influences transnationales sur la vie politique et religieuse. Ce faisant, il s’agit de mettre en lumière certaines apories et de souligner les limites d’une approche « individualisante » et psychologisante de la radicalisation violente par exemple. On pourrait ainsi confirmer ce que l’observation des situations conflictuelles en Afrique sub-saharienne conduit déjà à soutenir, à savoir que le lien entre radicalisation religieuse et passage à la violence est souvent plus faible qu’on veut bien l’admettre.

  1. D’un radicalisme à l’autre: par-delà le « terrorisme islamique »

En quoi des radicalisations religieuses non islamiques ont-elles pu évoluer, émerger ou se transformer dans une conjoncture où le « radicalisme islamique » tient le haut du pavé ? En quoi le poids du retour du religieux voire du djihadisme ont-ils affecté d’autres processus de radicalité ou même de violence ? Aborder la question sous cet angle permettrait de prendre du champ par rapport aux analyses conjoncturelles, tout en introduisant une nécessaire perspective comparative afin de revisiter de façon critique les analyses, les politiques et les usages de la radicalisation dans le champ social et politique, voire académique. Il s’agit d’interroger cette catégorie de « radicalisation » de façon plus large y compris en cherchant à déterminer quelles sont les relations de continuité et de rupture entre les radicalismes islamiques et les autres, y compris sur la longue durée et dans divers contextes africains. Cela revient à prendre en compte les changements récents et de mesurer leurs effets sur les rapports entre réformistes et conservateurs, tradition et renouveau, dans un contexte d’essoufflement des espoirs de démocratisation, de changements de l’économie politique des sociétés sub-sahariennes, de débats sur le rôle de la religion dans l’espace public, de réformes de l’éducation ou du droit de la famille par exemple.

  1. Radicalisations et rapports au monde ?

Le facteur « radical » modifie le rapport de l’Afrique au monde dans des proportions peu étudiées. Les contributeurs chercheront moins à analyser la géopolitique descriptive du radicalisme qu’à aborder de façon frontale et explicite les implications de l’usage des notions du radicalisme et de la radicalisation sur le devenir de l’État, ses rapports à la société et son insertion internationale. Il conviendrait d’explorer notamment comment des éléments exogènes, proprement politiques ou sociaux, deviennent centraux dans le déclenchement de la violence et sa perpétuation sur le continent ou comment des ressortissants du sous-continent se retrouvent dans des réseaux dits « radicaux ». On pourrait aussi s’attacher à l’étude de la globalisation de certains répertoires de violence même s’il faut manier avec une grande prudence la thématique des réseaux sociaux et des révolutions 2.0.

Il conviendrait de se demander selon quelles modalités les petites guerres menées avec l’aide de pays occidentaux contre des groupes radicaux situés aux marges de sociétés africaines se transforment en longues guerres. Ces engagements militaires peuvent générer de nouvelles lignes de partage entre espace privé et espace public, entre droits citoyens et conformisme identitaire avec, à la clef, une nouvelle mise à distance de l’État hérité de la colonisation. En tout cas, à travers la multiplicité des analyses particulières, on pourrait retrouver l’immanence des expériences de l’arbitraire et de la violence comme prolégomènes à ladite radicalisation comme l’affirment de plus en plus les chercheurs sur l’Europe occidentale (Khosrokhavar, 2016 ; Moos, 2016) et souligner combien, en Afrique comme ailleurs, la radicalisation et la lutte anti-terroriste font système. Il convient dès lors d’explorer dans cet axe la manière dont les dispositifs internationaux nommément mis en place pour lutter contre la radicalisation ont pu indirectement concourir à renforcer des réalités que l’on range sous ce terme.

 

Calendrier

  • 15 avril 2017 : date limite d’envoi des propositions d’article (max. 7000 signes espaces compris) à Roland Marchal (marchal@sciencespo.fr) et Zekeria Ould Ahmed Salem (zekeriasalem@gmail.com)
  • 30 avril 2017 : notification aux auteurs des propositions retenues par les coordinateurs du dossier
  • 15 septembre 2017 : date limite d’envoi des articles sélectionnés ( 55 000 signes notes et espaces compris) aux coordinateurs du dossier
  • Mars 2018 : parution des articles acceptés par le comité de rédaction de Politique africaine

Bibliographie :

Anonyme, “The Popular Discourses of Salafi Radicalism and Salafi Counter-radicalism in Nigeria: A Case Study of Boko Haram”, Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 42, n° 2, 2012, p. 118-144.

Athena-Alliance Nationale des Sciences humaines et Sociales, Recherches sur les radicalisations, les formes de violence qui en résultent, et la manière dont les sociétés les préviennent et s’en protègent. Etat des lieux, propositions, actions, Paris, mars 2016, <http://cache.media.education.gouv.fr/file/03__mars/22/9/Rapport_Radicalisation_545229.pdf?ts=1457090184>

Barkindo, Atta, “How Boko Haram exploits History and Memory”, Londres, Africa Research Institute, Counterpoints Series, octobre 2016.

Bayart, Jean-François, Les fondamentalistes de l’identité. Laïcisme versus djihadisme,  Paris, Karthala, 2016.

Becker, Felicitas, “Rural Islamism during the ‘War on Terror’: A Tanzanian Case Study,” African Affairs, n°105, 2006, p. 583–603.

Brigaglia, Andrea, « The volatility of Salafi Political Theology, the War on Terror and The Genesis of Boko Haram », Diritto e questioni pubbliche (Palermo), 2015, p. 174-201.

Collovald, Annie, Gaiti, Brigitte (dir.), La démocratie aux extrêmes. Sur la radicalisation politique, Paris, La Dispute, 2006.

Crettiez, Xavier, « Penser la radicalisation. Une sociologie processuelle des variables de l’engagement violent », Revue Française de Science Politique, vol. 66, n° 5, 2016, p. 709-727.

Kaba, Lansiné, The Wahhabiya. Islamic Reform and Politics in French West Africa, Evanston, Northwestern University Press, 1974.

Kane, Ousmane et Triaud, Jean-Louis, Islamismes au Sud du Sahara, Paris, Karthala, 1993.

Kepel, Gilles, Terreur dans l’Hexagone, Paris, Gallimard, 2015.

Khosrokhavar, Farhad, La Radicalisation, Paris, Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, 2014.

Kobo, Ousman , “The Development of Wahhabi Reforms in Ghana and Burkina Faso, 1960–1990: Elective Affinities between  Western-Educated Muslims and Islamic Scholars,” Comparative Studies in Society and  History, vol. 51, n° 3, 2009, p. 502-532.

Marshall, Ruth, “Destroying arguments and captivating thoughts: spiritual warfare prayer as global praxis”, Journal of Religion and Political Practice, vol. 2, n° 1, 2016, p. 92-113.

Moos, Olivier, « Le jihad s’habille en Prada. Une analyse des conversions djihadistes en Europe », Religioscope, Cahiers de l’Institut, n° 14, Paris, août 2016.

Neumann, Peter, « The trouble with radicalization », International Affairs, vol. 89, n° 4, 2013, p. 873–893

Ostebo, Terje, Localising Salafism. Religious Change among Oromo Muslims in Bale, Ethiopia, Leiden, Brill, 2012.

Ostebo, Terje (dir.), Dossier « Salafism in Africa », Islamic Africa, vol. 6, n° 1-2, 2015 (a).

Ostebo, T., « African Salafism. Religious Purity and the Politicization of Purity », Islamic Africa, Vol.6, n°1-2,  p. 1-29, 2015 (b).

Otayek, René (dir.), Le radicalisme islamique au sud du Sahara. Da’wa, arabisation et critique de l’Occident, Paris, Karthala, MSH Aquitaine, 1993.

Ould Ahmed Salem, Zekeria, “The paradoxes of Islamic Radicalization in Mauritania”, in George Joffe (dir.), Islamic Activism in The Maghreb. Politics and Process, London, Routledge, 2011, p. 179-2005.

Ould Ahmed Salem Zekeria, Prêcher dans le désert. Islam politique et changement social en Mauritanie, Paris, Karthala, 2013.

Pratt, Douglas, « Islamophobia as Reactive Co-Radicalization », Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations, vol. 26, n° 2, 2015, p. 205-218.

Robinson, David., Paths of Accomodation. Muslim societies and French colonial authorities, Athens, Ohio University Press, 2000.

Robinson, D., Les sociétés musulmanes africaines. Configurations et trajectoires historiques, Paris, Karthala, trad. franç., 2010.

Sanneh, Lamin, Beyond Jihad. The pacifist tradition in West African Islam, New York, Oxford University Press, 2016.

Sanson, Fabienne (dir.),  Dossier « L’Islam au-delà des catégories », Cahier d’études africaines, n° 206-207, 2012.

Searing, James, “God Alone is King”: Islam and Emancipation in Senegal, 1859-1914, Portsmouth, Heinemann, 2001.

[1] Voir « Olivier Roy et Gilles Kepel, querelle française sur le jihadisme », Libération, 14 avril 2016. Loin d’avoir été cantonnée à la presse parisienne, cette polémique a été répercutée ailleurs. Voir notamment “ ‘That Ignoramus’: 2 French Scholars of Radical Islam Turn Bitter Rivals”, The New York Times, 16 juillet 2016.

[2] On pense ici à l’Ethiopie ou à la RCA en Afrique, mais aussi aux discours occidentaux qui promeuvent aujourd’hui une conception radicale de la laïcité, bien différente de celle qui a prévalu pendant longtemps.

[3] Citons le cas, entre autres, de la conférence intitulée “Islam and World Peace: Perspectives from African Muslim Non-violence Traditions” tenue du 11 au 13 septembre 2015 l’Institut d’études africaines de Columbia University (New York) en collaboration avec la confrérie mouride de Touba (Sénégal).

 

 

*****

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Rethinking religious radicalisation in Africa”

coordinated by Roland Marchal (CNRS, Ceri-Sciences-Po)

and Zekeria Ould Ahmed Salem (University of Nouakchott)

 

Devoting a special issue of Politique africaine to religious radicalization was far from being self-evident. After all, academics, medias and policy makers alike have already greatly appropriated the subject. Our aim is precisely to draw on this profusion of discourse on radicalization in order to explore the ways in which social sciences approach this topic, especially with regards to case studies from the African continent.

The expansion of so-called “Islamic terrorism” has polarised public debate around the issue of “radicalisation” (Neumann, 2013) and its political, social and security consequences (Khorsokhavar, 2014; Kepel, 2015). The meaning of this concept, familiar to political sociologists (Collovald and Gaiti, 2006), has morphed and transformed the stakes surrounding its use in the aftermath of 9/11 (Crettiez, 2006).

However, as of late, scholarship on radicalisation has not been primarily driven by a sincere will to contribute to knowledge production, but rather by a desire to achieve fame or political recognition[1]. . The resources generated by counter-radicalisation programmes put in place by both governments and international organisations (the notorious CVE: Countering Violent Extremism) have paradoxically led to a rather non-critical use of the concepts of “radicalisation” and “radicalism”, including among social scientists. . For example, in France, the Athena initiative (a CNRS-lead programme dedicated to the study of radicalisation) was introduced to the public as an opportunity to start combining teaching and research – the traditional goals of the programme’s partner organisations – with the US-model of “community service”. The patrons of the projects suggested that this will help French social sciences to “finally” become useful” (Athena, 2016) by contributing to “counter-radicalisation” efforts. However, these narrower ties between fundamental research and its translation into practice raise a number of questions about academic freedom of thought and how it in turn contributes to the prioritisation of certain issues over other ones in the public debate.

Yet, it is precisely the task of social scientists to investigate the meanings attached to this whole new terminology. Scholars might want to explore in particular whether such vocabulary is a genuine reflection of the social phenomena it is meant to analyse.. This would lead to a set of new research questions. For example, should  issues as different as violence, cultural and religious dynamics be lumped and studied together?? Is it preferable to refer to semantic categories or to produce a more generic category of analysis, even if social actors themselves might well find it inaccurate? How do we escape “religious over-interpretation” of some political phenomena without downplaying the issue of the religious justification of violence (Brigaglia, 2015)?

This special issue aims at exploring radicalisation and radicalism in Africa through the triple scope of intellectual category, public policy and socio-religious processes, and their respective entanglements. We suggest addressing “radicalisation” by studying the way it unfolds in a given social and religious context; how it structures public debates provides a basis for political programmes; expresses social, political and religious change; and even affects the nature of the State or international relations of African nations. The objective here is to tackle this theme, in an African context, on the basis of, but also far beyond, studies of terrorism or jihadology. We posit that it is impossible to study Islamic radicalisation without contrasting it with other forms of non-Islamic radicalisation, or co-radicalisation (Pratt, 2015) – in cases of violent anti-Muslim fundamentalism (e.g. the anti-Balaka movements in Central African Republic) which are inspired by Revivalist Churches, for example. It is certain that fundamentalisms of any religious persuasion often appear to be “complementary enemies” (Bayart, 2016). However, do they necessarily lead to armed violence? Whatever the case, we encourage contributors to question the disparities between labelling and empirical reality through a careful exploration of how designations differ locally according to context:  for example, why is Boko Haram often identified as a “sect” in Nigeria? We must also acknowledge how difficult it can be to ground our reflection in fieldwork when conducting empirical research is nearly impossible in contexts fraught with “terrorist threats” or “civil wars”. Therefore, how do we adapt our research strategies accordingly in order to generate data and analysis (Barkindo, 2016)?

Africa has largely been excluded from recent public debate on “Islamic fundamentalism”, when such debates take place outside Africa.  Yet, as far as radicalism is concerned, Africa could actually provide a rather relevant comparative perspective on such issues. This is especially true since France and its allies have been military involved both north and south of the Sahara in the name of the fight against jihadist radicalisation. Furthermore, semi-political, semi-scientific discourse on radicalisation (e.g. the use of ill-defined terms such as “terrorism” or “extremism”) (Sanson et al., 2012) has significant localised repercussions, to the point of causing serious interrogation about the concurrent radicalisation of States or of certain social factions hostile to Islam or Muslim communities[2]. Similarly, a number of armed groups and individuals in Africa have engaged in radicalism and terrorism, prompting international military interventions notably in the Sahel region, while local armies in the Lake Chad basin countries are fighting against Boko Haram or the al-Shabab in Somalia.

Since “radicalisation” is a word associated first and foremost with the study of “homegrown terrorists” in the West, Africa has been pushed to the fringes of the political and scientific analysis of radicalisation, in particular « Islamic » radicalisation. But there are also other more debatable reasons why “radicalisation in Africa” has not been a popular topic. First, there is a a persistent culturalist vision of sub-Saharan Africa as a home of a particular “Black Islam” or “West African Islamic Tradition” (Sanneh, 2016). The continent is therefore deemed resistant to any doctrinal radicalisation and violent transformation[3]. We know all too well the ideological undertones associated with this point of view and how little it is grounded in historical facts. Secondly, Africa is also supposed to be somehow immune to Salafist jihadism that is often  understood as the ideological framework justifying violence, organising it or setting its watchwords and targets (Ostebo, 2015).

However, it is impossible to analyse the expansion of literalist Islam to certain parts of the continent while ignoring local history – of which religious revolutions are an intrinsic part (Robinson, 2000; 2010; Searing, 2001) – and Africa’s specific position in the globalisation of political and religious ideologies (Ould Ahmed Salem, 2011; 2013). This has already been established by prior works addressing the unending competition n between reform and tradition (Kaba, 1974; Kobo, 2009) as well as “Islamism in Africa” (Kane and Triaud, 1993) and even “Islamic radicalisation in Africa” (Otayek et al., 1993).

If radical Islamism has dominated in recent times, it would be short-sighted to exclude other forms of radicalism from our analysis or to limit our study of the political effects of radicalisation to the sole religious world. We should ask what other forms of radicalisation are growing within or on the margins of other religions practiced in Africa and what is their degree of potential politicisation? What is the connection between different forms of religious radicalisation on the continent? Recent media trends tend to lead us to forget how political regimes in Africa have hardened their attitudes vis-à-vis Muslim communities in order to better take advantage of the international opportunities offered by the so called “world war on terror”. This rhetoric, as well as the underestimation of other religious players such as Revivalist, Evangelical or Pentecostal churches, has reconfigured certain social divides into full-on confrontation between religious communities.

This special issue aims to use specific African case studies in order to answer more general questions such as: what part does religious, political and social contexts have to play in the process of religious radicalisation and its shift towards violence? How does religious radicalisation, be it real or perceived, affect political life, social relationships, and modes of governance in the context of the “world war on terrorism” and de-radicalisation projects? What links exist between religious renewal and other dynamics relative to intergenerational debates, the role of the elites, neo-liberal reform of the continent’s economies, social movements and transnational relations with both the West and the Muslim world? How does research on terrorism or radicalisation, as well as the ever growing consultancy market on the subject affect research on this and other subjects such as State-building, political economy, social inequality or social change?

The objective here is not primarily to map out religious radicalisation on the continent or produce geopolitical analyses on the advance of extremism  South of the Sahara. Therefore, it is necessary that potential contributors be aware of the fact that the concept of “radicalization” is so charged that it compels anyone using it to state as clearly as possible their own definition of it and how they intend to use it in exploring their own data and argument. This means that it indispensable for contributors to discuss terminology in the context of their respective fields in order to avoid simply echoing political and media discourse.

Taking into account this general perspective, contributions could be articulated around the three following sub-themes:

  1. Religious radicalisation and counter-radicalisations

It would be relevant here to explain how the rise of religious rigorism is, in certain contexts, concretely opposed to a more moderate tradition, as well as how local and national players with diverse incentives offer counter-radicalisation solutions that don’t always fit in with national or international frameworks of “institutional de-radicalisation”. This approach has already been applied to Nigeria (Anonymous, 2012). It has also been determined that on a micro-local level, confrontations between Salafist and traditionalist Muslims often no longer centre on politics or violence but rather on the social value of religious knowledge for example (Becker, 2006). In many countries, Salafism has not translated into violence even if it has transformed the religious landscape generating a so called “African Salafism” (Ostebo, 2015) sometimes on a localised level (Becker, 2006; Ostebo, 2012). At the same time, the concept of “spiritual war” has become a slogan and a practice for many globalised Pentecostals (Marshall, 2016).

By exploring the theme of radicalisation on the African continent, this special issue seeks to emphasise how much religion as a whole, including its relationship to the State, has been continually transformed following trends influenced by both internal social factors and globalisation’s transnational influences on political and religious life. In doing so, it should highlight certain contradictions and demonstrate the limits of an “individualising” and psychologising approach to violent radicalisation. We could thereby confirm what the observation of conflicts in sub-Saharan Africa already leads us to posit, namely that the link between religious radicalisation and violence is often weaker than we care to admit.

  1. Radicalism in comparative perspective: beyond “Islamic terrorism”.

 

How have non-Islamic forms of religious radicalisation evolved, emerged or been transformed in a context where “Islamic radicalism” holds centre-stage? How does the resurgence of religiosity and even jihadism affect other processes of radicalism or violence? Posing the question under this angle would enable us to gain some perspective with regard to short-term analyses. It would also introduce the comparative overview necessary to critically revisit the analyses, politics and applications of the concept of radicalisation in social and political and even academic fields. We seek to widen the scope of the investigation into “radicalisation” by trying to ascertain how dynamics of continuity and rupture between Islamic and other forms of radicalism play out in the long term and in different African contexts. This involves taking into account recent changes and then measuring their effects on the relationship between reformists and conservatives, tradition and renewal, in a context of weakened hopes for democratisation, profound changes in the political economy of sub-Saharan societies, as well as in a context of heated debates over the role of religion in the public sphere, and the reform of education and of family law to name but a few.

  1. Radicalisation and relationship to the world?

 

The “radical” factor changes the relationship that Africa has to the world in proportions that are little-studied. Contributors should not try to analyse the descriptive geopolitics of radicalism so much as they should directly and explicitly address the repercussions of the use of the concept of radicalism and radicalisation on the evolution of the African State, its relationship to society and its international integration. It would be relevant to explore how certain exogenous elements, be they political or social, become central to the outbreak of violence and its enactment throughout the continent. Or how nationals of the sub-continent find themselves caught up in so-called “radical” networks. One could also attempt a study of the globalisation of certain categories of violence, bearing in mind that the theme of social media and 2.0 revolutions should be handled with utmost caution.

It would be useful to reflect on how small wars lead with the support of Western countries against radical groups on the margins of African societies morph into drawn-out conflicts. These military engagements can create new divides between private and public spaces, between citizen’s rights and the need to conform to social identities, resulting in further detachment from a colonially inherited State. In any case, through multiple, case-specific analyses, it may be possible to assert, as specialists of Western Europe increasingly are (Khosrokhavar, 2016; Moos, 2016), that experiences of arbitrariness and violence are preliminary to radicalisation. We could also underline how, in Africa and elsewhere, radicalisation and the war on terrorism are systematically interwoven. This axis should explore how international measures set up to counter radicalisation may have indirectly contributed to reinforcing realities that could be classified as such.

 

 

 

Calendar

  • 15 April 2017: deadline for the submission of abstracts (max. 7000 characters spaces included) to Roland Marchal (marchal@sciencespo.fr) and Zekeria Ould Ahmed Salem (zekeriasalem@gmail.com)
  • 30 April 2017: announcement of the submissions selected by the project coordinators
  • 15 September 2017: deadline for the submission of selected papers ( 55 000 characters spaces and footnotes included) to the project coordinators
  • March 2018: expected publication of the articles accepted by Politique africaine’s editorial board

 

Bibliography:

Anonymous, “The Popular Discourses of Salafi Radicalism and Salafi Counter-radicalism in Nigeria: A Case Study of Boko Haram”, Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 42, n° 2, 2012, p. 118-144.

Athena-Alliance Nationale des Sciences humaines et Sociales, Recherches sur les radicalisations, les formes de violence qui en résultent, et la manière dont les sociétés les préviennent et s’en protègent. Etat des lieux, propositions, actions, Paris, mars 2016, <http://cache.media.education.gouv.fr/file/03__mars/22/9/Rapport_Radicalisation_545229.pdf?ts=1457090184>

Barkindo, Atta, “How Boko Haram exploits History and Memory”, Londres, Africa Research Institute, Counterpoints Series, octobre 2016.

Bayart, Jean-François, Les fondamentalistes de l’identité. Laïcisme versus djihadisme,  Paris, Karthala, 2016.

Becker, Felicitas, “Rural Islamism during the ‘War on Terror’: A Tanzanian Case Study,” African Affairs, n°105, 2006, p. 583–603.

Brigaglia, Andrea, « The volatility of Salafi Political Theology, the War on Terror and The Genesis of Boko Haram », Diritto e questioni pubbliche (Palermo), 2015, p. 174-201.

Collovald, Annie, Gaiti, Brigitte (dir.), La démocratie aux extrêmes. Sur la radicalisation politique, Paris, La Dispute, 2006.

Crettiez, Xavier, « Penser la radicalisation. Une sociologie processuelle des variables de l’engagement violent », Revue Française de Science Politique, vol. 66, n° 5, 2016, p. 709-727.

Kaba, Lansiné, The Wahhabiya. Islamic Reform and Politics in French West Africa, Evanston, Northwestern University Press, 1974.

Kane, Ousmane et Triaud, Jean-Louis, Islamismes au Sud du Sahara, Paris, Karthala, 1993.

Kepel, Gilles, Terreur dans l’Hexagone, Paris, Gallimard, 2015.

Khosrokhavar, Farhad, La Radicalisation, Paris, Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, 2014.

Kobo, Ousman , “The Development of Wahhabi Reforms in Ghana and Burkina Faso, 1960–1990: Elective Affinities between  Western-Educated Muslims and Islamic Scholars,” Comparative Studies in Society and  History, vol. 51, n° 3, 2009, p. 502-532.

Marshall, Ruth, “Destroying arguments and captivating thoughts: spiritual warfare prayer as global praxis”, Journal of Religion and Political Practice, vol. 2, n° 1, 2016, p. 92-113.

Moos, Olivier, « Le jihad s’habille en Prada. Une analyse des conversions djihadistes en Europe », Religioscope, Cahiers de l’Institut, n° 14, Paris, août 2016.

Neumann, Peter, « The trouble with radicalization », International Affairs, vol. 89, n° 4, 2013, p. 873–893

Ostebo, Terje, Localising Salafism. Religious Change among Oromo Muslims in Bale, Ethiopia, Leiden, Brill, 2012.

Ostebo, Terje (dir.), Dossier « Salafism in Africa », Islamic Africa, vol. 6, n° 1-2, 2015 (a).

Ostebo, T., « African Salafism. Religious Purity and the Politicization of Purity », Islamic Africa, Vol.6, n°1-2,  p. 1-29, 2015 (b).

Otayek, René (dir.), Le radicalisme islamique au sud du Sahara. Da’wa, arabisation et critique de l’Occident, Paris, Karthala, MSH Aquitaine, 1993.

Ould Ahmed Salem, Zekeria, “The paradoxes of Islamic Radicalization in Mauritania”, in George Joffe (dir.), Islamic Activism in The Maghreb. Politics and Process, London, Routledge, 2011, p. 179-2005.

Ould Ahmed Salem Zekeria, Prêcher dans le désert. Islam politique et changement social en Mauritanie, Paris, Karthala, 2013.

Pratt, Douglas, « Islamophobia as Reactive Co-Radicalization », Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations, vol. 26, n° 2, 2015, p. 205-218.

Robinson, David., Paths of Accomodation. Muslim societies and French colonial authorities, Athens, Ohio University Press, 2000.

Robinson, D., Les sociétés musulmanes africaines. Configurations et trajectoires historiques, Paris, Karthala, trad. franç., 2010.

Sanneh, Lamin, Beyond Jihad. The pacifist tradition in West African Islam, New York, Oxford University Press, 2016.

Sanson, Fabienne (dir.),  Dossier « L’Islam au-delà des catégories », Cahier d’études africaines, n° 206-207, 2012.

Searing, James, “God Alone is King”: Islam and Emancipation in Senegal, 1859-1914, Portsmouth, Heinemann, 2001.

[1] See « Olivier Roy et Gilles Kepel, querelle française sur le jihadisme », Libération, 14 April 2016. The repercussions of this controversy were felt far beyond the Parisian press. See, for example, “‘That Ignoramus’: 2 French Scholars of Radical Islam Turn Bitter Rivals”, The New York Times, 16 July 2016.

[2] This is the case in Ethiopia or RCA in Africa, but it also brings to mind Western rhetoric that currently promotes a radical conception of secularism, very different from that which used to dominate political discourse.

[3] An example among many is that of the conference titled “Islam and World Peace: Perspectives from African Muslim Non-violence Traditions”, held from the 11th to the 13th September 2015 at the Institute for African Studies of Columbia University (New York) in collaboration with the Mouride Brotherhood of Touba (Senegal).

Appel à contribution : Sortie de crise en Côte d’Ivoire

Sortie de crise en Côte d’Ivoire:

Défis et modalités sociopolitiques d’une réécriture de soi

 Dossier coordonné par Francis Akindès et Séverin Kouame

Le décès de Félix Houphouët-Boigny a ouvert, en Côte d’Ivoire, l’arène d’une lutte pour le pouvoir qui a duré un peu plus d’une décennie. Dans cette arène se sont constamment affrontés son seul et unique Premier Ministre (M. Alassane Ouattara), son dernier Président de l’Assemblée nationale et alors dauphin constitutionnel (M. Henri Konan Bédié), son dernier Chef d’État-major des armées (Feu le général Guéï Robert) et son opposant historique (M. Laurent Gbagbo). En plus d’introduire dans la praxis politique un usage important de la violence, ces affrontements, de par leur excessive brutalité, ont fortement écorné l’image d’un pays présenté jusqu’alors comme modèle de stabilité sociopolitique dans la sous-région. Pis, ils vont même inscrire dans la trame historique du pays ses pages les plus sombres avec son lot de phénomènes politiques traumatisants comme la production de charniers, les coups d’état à répétition et une rébellion armée. Ces modalités « nouvelles » de structuration de la compétition politique en Côte d’Ivoire n’ont certainement pas inauguré la mobilisation de la violence dans le champ politique local. Mais elles signent une escalade dans la « brutalisation » de ce champ. Restant dans la continuité de cette violence politique, la crise postélectorale de 2010 et ses 3 000 morts ont légué un trauma collectif et un héritage lourd de défis conjoncturels pour l’État.

Continuer la lecture de Appel à contribution : Sortie de crise en Côte d’Ivoire

Appel à contributions : Techniques des corps politiques

Dossier coordonné par Thomas Riot et Nicolas Bancel

Institut des sciences du sport de l’Université de Lausanne (ISSUL-SSP), Institut des mondes africains (IMAF-CNRS)

« L’Afrique a échoué. Vous les sportifs avez été les seuls à réussir et vous nous avez montré la voie à suivre à nous les hommes politiques », Mälläs Zénawi lors de la cérémonie de clôture des XVIe championnats d’athlétisme d’Afrique (le 4 mai 2008, à Addis Abäba).

Depuis la fin des années 1990, de nombreux Etats subsahariens – parfois démarchés par des organisations non gouvernementales et divers fonds d’investissement privés et internationaux – ont élaboré des pédagogies physiques et sportives inscrites dans leurs politiques de « développement » et de « reconstruction » post-conflictuelle. Cette « politique du survêtement » n’est pas nouvelle : dès les années 1950 (et bien plus ardemment dans les décennies qui suivirent les décolonisations), de nombreux pays ont développé des parties de football (Alegi, 2004), des jeux de piste et de capture (Honwana et de Boeck, 2005) ou encore des danses d’affrontement (Ranger, 1975) qui ont contribué au mûrissement de mobilisations politiques des plus pacifiques aux plus radicales  (Bancel, Denis et Fatès, 2003 ; Fair, 1997). Le Rwanda offre un exemple révélateur des trajectoires obliques que peuvent prendre ces activités. Du début des années 1990 au mois de juillet 1994, le transfert de conduites sportives, chorégraphiques et guerrières vers la mise en œuvre du génocide a été grandement conditionné par l’engagement (volontaire, conseillé ou forcé) de plusieurs milliers de danseurs, de footballeurs et de supporters dans les groupes extrémistes qui menèrent les pogroms anti-Tutsi (notamment interahamwe). Dans le contexte d’une politique développementaliste transformée en ordre génocidaire (Viret, 2009 ; Straus, 2006), ces groupes miliciens se sont engagés dans une articulation dynamique de savoirs corporels acquis dans le monde du « loisir » et de dispositifs miliciens issus de la société civile (Riot, 2014). De nos jours, et tandis que ces activités furent précédemment affectées à des processus de socialisation politique des plus radicaux, le gouvernement du Rwanda post-génocide convoque les mêmes pratiques (via le dispositif itorero, inspiré de pratiques précoloniales et qui mêle danses guerrières, football et veillées de défis) afin – selon ses propres termes – de combattre la « mentalité génocidaire » et de reconstruire une société profondément marquée par la violence de masse (Riot, Boistelle et Bancel, 2016).

Continuer la lecture de Appel à contributions : Techniques des corps politiques