Call for proposals : Politicizing the domestic worker. Socio-historical perspectives on domestic labor in Africa

Call for proposals to the journal Politique africaine

Politicizing the domestic worker.

Socio-historical perspectives on domestic labor in Africa

Special issue coordinated by Mélanie Jacquemin, sociologist at the IRD (UMR 151 LPED, AMU/IRD) and Violaine Tisseau, historian at the CNRS (UMR 8171 IMAf, AMU/CNRS/EHESS/IRD/EPHE/Paris 1).

Presentation of the present issue

The impetus of this special issue is a finding in a field of research and publications that is, at the very least, fragmented: studies about work done in the private sphere remain on the sidelines in the literature on labor in Africa. Here we invite authors to further explore how a domestic service market has established itself in societies won over by modernity and new forms of legal regulations, despite the frequent persistence of traditional, hierarchical relationships, extolled through the language of kinship, in domestic labor. This language generally dilutes the concept of work (value and social relationships) and maintains the permeable line between domestic labor/employment for the benefit of others and non-delegated household chores. Combined with the trivialized nature of the occupation, the domestic workers’ status as “society’s youngest family member” raises questions. How do these categories of workers participate in countries’ social and economic citizenship, which sometimes has been refused to them on the grounds that household work is fixed in the status quo of beliefs and the private domain, while rationality and public recognition are still deemed appropriate to labor performed outside of the domestic sphere?

Context and challenges

Because it is performed in private settings, domestic labor is unique in that it is usually perceived as unproductive and eluding both economic accounting systems and State regulation. Nevertheless, there are multiple forms of employment or domestic service: formal, informal, paid, paid in kind, reported or not, etc. With the goal of considering and deciphering this diversity with its sometimes-blurred contours, we have adopted a broad meaning, with an updated definition of “putting people to work (mise au travail)” (Lautier, 1998) as a minimum criterion. By reconsidering this activity as labor, we are able to introduce the issue of policy, firstly, because domestic work is perceived the same way as work performed in any other space. Secondly, investigating the various conditions and modalities of domestic service; how it is regulated (via private, community, State, or intermediary entities); and the forms of domestic workers’ resistance, and even protest (from the most discreet to the most overt) sheds further light on the inner workings of establishing citizenship and constructing a State.

By focusing on empirical approaches, we hope to highlight the importance of contexts—whether political, social, economic, or historic—and bring together articles examining different spaces and time periods. The conditions of domestic service, ways in which dissatisfaction can build up, and opportunities for protesting differ in the colonial period, under apartheid, or throughout the fight for independence, for example, or during periods of economic growth or crisis. While a refusal, or even a denial, to be noticed or recognized renders many male and female domestic workers invisible (Jacquemin, 2009), are their mobilizations also doomed to remain invisible because they are rare and barrow from multiple forms? Definitely not, and by analyzing the situation of domestic employees in Rio de Janeiro, Dominique Vidal (2007) convincingly showed how they were at the very heart of Brazilian democracy.

This special issue also encourages authors to consider a new international context, emerging from the adoption of normative tools driven by United Nations agencies, and to examine how this context is conveyed. In June 2011, the International Labour Organization (ILO) adopted Convention No. 189, encouraging States to regulate domestic employment to “extend basic labor rights to domestic workers worldwide.”[1]

For the youngest workers (including the many “little maids” in Africa), the ratification of ILO Conventions No. 138 and No. 182 on Child Labor is becoming more widespread in African States, which have all ratified the International Convention on the Rights of the Child, adopted by the United Nations in 1989. At the same time, NGOs and associations have redoubled their child protection programs; while the dominant abolitionist platform can antagonize supporters of child-worker practices or “demands,” some organizations under the banner of the African Movement of Working Children and Youth have joined together to give a voice to domestic workers who are overlooked by society and often forgotten in the academic field.

Objectives

While most of the current research on “domestic workers” applies a globalized economic approach that links this issue to the rise in female South-North migration, this special issue aims to focus on African domestic labor from yesterday to today, which—despite a substantial migratory component on both an internal and intra-African scale and remarkable changes—remains overshadowed by more dramatic transformations seen in the North, such as those spurred by international migrations or the phenomenon of trafficking in women and children. Drawing from our research on “the” domestic worker in Africa from the perspectives of a historian and a socio-ethnographer, we support the merits of an expanded exploration of the multiple forms of domestic service in Africa in this special issue. At the very least, this promotes continuity, via the issue of domestic labor, to support efforts to “reconnect discussions on the link between the political and social order to be able to report from a non-culturalist stance on the ways in which it is possible and imaginable to be heard” (Siméant, 2013: 141).

We want to examine the economic, political, and symbolic significance of the changes at play in diverse social contexts and then identify other aspects that have remained unchanged and what these mean, while unveiling elements specific to the African context, especially with respect to gender relations. We will do this in three ways. First, we will examine the changes in labor relations (from familial logics to wage-type contractual relationships; task specialization; forms of hiring; maintaining dependent relationships, passed down through slavery; the force of paternalistic relationships; etc.). We will also analyze day-to-day relationships within households in terms of gender, class, “race,” and age and how these factors are embodied and transcribed in practices and discourses, or even in spaces. Lastly, we will examine these changes by describing what means are available—or not—to domestic workers to resist domination.

The gender perspective is highly encouraged in this special  as a crosscutting tool for analysis. Since research overall shows that domestic service is socially constructed around the globe as a subordinate function defined in terms of gender, the study of domestic labor in Africa—in all its variations and evolutions—provides especially fertile ground for analyzing the potential transformations of dominant gender relationships through reconsideration or consolidation. Central to the analysis of inequalities between women and men that primarily affect women, domestic labor in Africa often and still specifically identifies as masculine (recalling, for example, the Burkinabe “boys” in Abidjan or the “ababuyi” of Bujumbura), urging us to examine how the different relationships of domination overlap.

Three key points could be explored (though other approaches could be combined with these):

  • Describe, recognize, and quantify domestic labor in Africa

The first key point aims to describe the various forms of domestic service in Africa, by varying the scope in time and space. It will focus on showing the diversity and plurality of employment status, employers, working conditions and situations, etc.

When attempting to typologize domestic labor, researchers face challenges with vocabulary. Ordinary Francophone (and Anglophone) terminology does not fully express the range of working conditions, so vernacular terms will also be studied: in Madagascar, for example, the use of the term boto (right-hand man, servant) has shifted towards using mpanampy (someone who helps).

Moreover, many African societies share a specific feature, namely, the existence—both in the past and now—of the status of slave[2] (passed on via kinship), as well as child circulation practices (“fostering”) that keep individuals in situations of dependence and even servitude (Jacquemin, 2000). Colonization did not do away with the social status of slave and descendants of slaves by abolishing slavery, leaving domestic jobs immune to any regulation (Haskins, 2015). Domestic labor is often performed by individuals who are exposed to diverse forms of vulnerability in a given social context, with their status as an employee not always recognized as such. Therefore, domestic workers’ age, sex, and geographic and social origins will be variables to consider, given that radical changes are sometimes observed in the workforce. While Karen Hansen (1989) emphasizes that domestic workers were primarily men in Zambia, the opposite was true several years later when more women held these jobs (Hepburn, 2016).

  • Plurality of standards

This second key point will address the issue of regulating domestic service in order to document the varied ways it is implemented: by the State, “communities” (families, lineages, parishes), the private sector (placement agencies, etc.) or associations, etc. It introduces the issue of a plurality of standards and their dynamics (Chauveau et al., 2001), seen through the prism of the range of domestic service practices, from the co-existence of formal and informal standards on different levels, stemming from “varied sources of legitimacy.”

The broad formalization of domestic service is therefore a point to explore, in connection with the gradual State supervision of labor and the implementation of social protection systems, such as: Do domestic workers pay into social security or pensions? Are they reported in the national tax records? The use of contracts for work over time is another issue for reflection.

By continuing to ask the explicit question about economic recognition of domestic labor, which, achieved through hard-fought struggle in several countries (Ibos, 2016), remains quite incomplete in Africa, we can also strive to understand exactly how barriers and progress come into play depending on the socio-political contexts. Focusing on female domestic workers’ involvement in negotiating ILO Convention No. 189 concerning “Decent Work for Domestic Workers,” Helen Schwenken recalls that “the sine qua non condition for mobilization is seeing these women as “employees”—and not as “maids” or “servants”—and recognizing the private household as a workplace” (Schwenken, 2011: 114).

  • Mobilization: actors and repertoires of action

In an effort to challenge representations of domestic workers’ eternal consent, we also urge authors to explore the notion of a moral economy through domestic workers’ expressions and positions. As Johanna Siméant suggests, this especially involves questioning the ways in which “forms of lateral dissent” are captured (2013: 136) and “discerning the expression of dissent in instances without necessarily proposing an articulated political agenda” (Siméant, 2010: 150). Thus, reproducing social positions, the relationship to the State, and the expression of dissatisfaction are central issues that merit a deeper understanding of their interconnectedness.

Of course, domestic labor cannot be addressed as a specific sphere of activism, but it can no longer be completely excluded from the field of studies on collective action and mobilizations, even if the former take (or took) on different and unusual forms of expression and means of action in the space of urban labor movements in Africa. This is now well documented through the sociology of social movements that have spread across the African continent for twenty years (Siméant, 2013; Tall et al., 2015).

Using a micro-ethnography of conflicts or a more conventional analysis of institutionalized movements, this last point seeks to investigate the potential registers for mobilization—individual (avoidance, resistance to the routine, fleeing, legal action, etc.) or even implicit, or collective and public (unions, associations, etc.)—that this diverse category of workers can develop, from a combination of historical, sociological, and anthropological perspectives and in varied contexts. What strong correlations exist between a social group’s transformations and its propensity to mobilize itself? How does one go from resistance that leaves structures unchanged to broader action that is greater than any individual or private space? In an extension of the special issue in Politique africaine devoted to post-slavery and collective mobilizations (No. 140, 2015/4), here we will be interested in mobilizations founded on the demand for a common worker status. What connections might exist with workers organized around a common ancestry (descendants of slaves) and with extroverted forms of struggles? Under what conditions does one go from socially recognizing subordinate groups’ activities—in this case domestic workers—to normalizing their participation in citizenship and political life?

Proposals of unpublished articles (1 page) may be sent in French or English to the coordinators of the special issue until 4 December 2018.

melanie.jacquemin@ird.fr, violaine.tisseau@gmail.com

Schedule

4 Dec. 2018: deadline for sending article proposals (1 page maximum) to the special issue coordinators

14 Dec. 2018: author’s notified about selected proposals

15 March 2019: deadline for sending articles (50,000 characters, spaces and notes included) to the journal’s editorial board

Summer 2019: publication of the special issue.

References cited

Chauveau Jean-Pierre, Le Pape Marc, Olivier de Sardan Jean-Pierre, 2001, “La pluralité des normes et leurs dynamiques en Afrique : implications pour les politiques publiques,” in: Winter Gérard (coord.). Inégalités et politiques publiques en Afrique : pluralité des normes et jeux d’acteurs, Paris: IRD/Karthala, p. 145–162.

Hansen Tranberg Karen, 1989, Distant Companions: Servants and Employers in Zambia, 1900–1985, Ithaca: Oxford University Press

Haskins Victoria, 2015, Colonization and Domestic Service. Historical and Contemporary Perspectives, Oxford: Routledge.

Hepburn Sacha, 2016, “Bringing a Girl from the Village: Gender, Child Migration and Domestic Service in Post-Colonial Zambia,” in Marie Rodet and Elodie Razy (eds), Children on the Move in Africa: Past and Present Experiences of Migration, Woodbridge: James Currey, p. 69–84.

Ibos Caroline, 2016, “Travail domestique/domesticité,” Encyclopédie critique du genre. Corps, sexualité, rapports sociaux, Paris: La Découverte, p. 649–658.

Jacquemin Mélanie, 2000, “‘Petites nièces’ et petites bonnes, le travail des fillettes en milieu urbain de Côte-d’Ivoire,” Journal des Africanistes, 70 (1–2), p. 105–122.

Jacquemin Mélanie, 2009. “Invisible Young Female Migrant Workers: ‘Little Domestics’ in West Africa—Comparative Perspectives on Girls and Young Women’s Work”, Working Paper – Development Research Centre on Migration, Globalisation and Poverty/ University of Sussex, and Centre for Migration Studies/ University of Ghana, Accra. http://horizon.documentation.ird.fr/exl-doc/pleins_textes/divers16-06/010067209.pdf

Lautier Bruno, 1998. “Pour une sociologie de l’hétérogénéité du travail,” Tiers-Monde, volume 39, no. 154, p. 251–279.

Schwenken Helen, 2011. “Mobilisation des travailleuses domestiques migrantes : de la cuisine à l’Organisation internationale du travail,” Cahiers du Genre 2/2011, 51, p. 113–133.

Siméant Johanna, 2010, “’Économie morale’ et protestation – détours africains,” Genèses, 2010, 4, no. 81, p. 142–160.

Siméant Johanna, 2013, “Protester / mobiliser / ne pas consentir. Sur quelques avatars de la sociologie des mobilisations appliquée au continent africain,” Revue internationale de politique comparée, 2013, 2, vol. 20, p. 125–143.

Tall Kadya, Pommerolle Marie-Emmanuelle, Cahen Michel, 2015, Collective Mobilisations in Africa / Mobilisations collectives en Afrique, Leiden: Brill.

Vidal Dominique, 2007, Les bonnes de Rio. Emploi domestique et société démocratique au Brésil, Villeneuve d’Ascq: Presses Universitaires du Septentrion.

[1] ILO Convention No. 189 and Recommendation No. 201, on Decent Work for Domestic Workers. Entered into force in September 2013, this convention has only been ratified by 25 countries to date. On the African continent, only South Africa and Guinea have ratified it. In Senegal, for example, despite campaigns led by unions since 2011 in support of the international initiative “12 ratifications in 2012,” the government has left this issue unresolved.

[2] On this point, the special issue proposed here could be seen as an extension of special issue No. 140 of Politique africaine (“La question de l’esclavage en Afrique : Politisation et mobilisations [The Issue of Slavery in Africa: Politicization and Mobilizations],” which does not include any articles specifically addressing the issue of domestic labor.

Podcast : Crise de l’ethno-fédéralisme et réorientation du Developmental State en Éthiopie

Les podcasts du CERI

Crise de l’ethno-fédéralisme et réorientation du Developmental State en Éthiopie

Dans le cadre du séminaire Afrique : citoyenneté, conflits et politique et en collaboration avec l‘Association des Chercheurs de Politique africaine (ACPA), organisé au CERI (Centre de Recherches Internationales, Sciences Po) le 06/11/2018.

Avec:
Sabine Planel, IRD, IMAF
Mehdi Labzaé, Université de Paris 1

Discutant :
Eloi Ficquet, EHESS

Ecouter la conférence ici :

et ici :

Crise de l’ethno-fédéralisme et réorientation du Developmental State en Éthiopie⁩

Sciences Po-CERI
Mardi 6 novembre 2018
12:30 – 14:30
Lieu : 56 rue Jacob – Salle Jean Monnet, RdC – 75006 Paris

Dans le cadre du séminaire « Afrique : citoyenneté, conflits et politique » et en collaboration avec l’Association des Chercheurs de Politique africaine (ACPA).

Avec:
Sabine Planel, IRD, IMAF
Mehdi Labzaé, Université de Paris 1

Discutant :
Eloi Ficquet, EHESS

Responsables scientifiques: Sandrine Perrot, Richard Banégas, Laurent Fourchard et Roland Marchal

Politiser le domestique. Regards socio-historiques sur les domesticités en Afrique

Dossier coordonné par Mélanie Jacquemin, sociologue à l’IRD (UMR 151 LPED, AMU/IRD) et Violaine Tisseau, historienne au CNRS (UMR 8171 IMAf, AMU/CNRS/EHESS/IRD/EPHE/Paris 1).

Présentation du dossier

Cette proposition de dossier part d’un constat sur un champ de recherches et de publications pour le moins fragmentaire : dans la littérature sur le travail en Afrique, celui qui s’exerce dans la sphère privée reste encore étudié de manière résiduelle. C’est une invitation à explorer davantage la manière dont s’est constitué un marché du service domestique dans des sociétés gagnées par la modernité et des formes nouvelles de régulations juridiques, alors même que persistent souvent, dans la domesticité, des relations hiérarchisées de type traditionnel, encensées par le langage de la parenté. Ce dernier dilue généralement la notion de travail (valeur et rapport social) et entretient la porosité entre travail/emploi domestique pour le compte d’autrui et tâches ménagères non déléguées. Associé au caractère trivial de l’occupation, le statut de « cadets sociaux » des domestiques met encore en questions la participation de ces catégories de travailleurs à la citoyenneté sociale et économique des pays, qui leur serait parfois refusée au motif que le travail dans la maison est figé dans l’ordre des sentiments et du domaine privé, tandis que rationalité et reconnaissance publique restent jugées propres au travail qui s’accomplit hors de la sphère domestique.

Contexte et problématique

Parce qu’il s’exerce dans un cadre privé, le travail domestique a pour spécificité d’être le plus souvent perçu comme improductif, d’échapper aux systèmes de comptabilité économique ainsi qu’à la régulation de l’État. Il existe cependant des formes plurielles d’emploi ou de service domestique (formel/informel/salarié/rétribué en nature/comptabilisé ou non, etc.) ; avec l’objectif de prendre en considération et de décrypter cette diversité aux contours parfois fondus, c’est ici une acception large que nous retenons, avec pour critère minimal l’actualisation d’une « mise au travail » (Lautier, 1998). Reconsidérer cette activité comme travail permet d’y introduire la question du politique. À la fois parce qu’il s’y révèle comme pour n’importe quel autre espace de travail ; mais aussi parce que s’intéresser aux diverses conditions et modalités du service domestique, à ses modes de régulation (privés, communautaires, étatiques, intermédiaires), aux formes de résistance voire de protestation des domestiques (des plus discrètes aux plus ouvertes) – permet d’apporter un autre éclairage à la constitution de la citoyenneté et la construction d’un État.

En privilégiant les approches empiriques, nous souhaitons ici souligner l’importance des contextes – politiques, sociaux, économiques, historiques – et rassembler des articles s’intéressant à différents espaces et temps : les conditions du service domestique, la manière dont le mécontentement peut se nouer, les possibilités de protestation ne sont pas les mêmes selon que l’on est pendant la période coloniale, sous l’apartheid, ou pendant des moments de lutte pour les indépendances par exemple, ou encore selon que l’on est en période de croissance ou de crise économique, etc. Tandis que nombre de travailleuses et travailleurs domestiques sont rendus invisibles par un refus voire un déni de (re)connaissance (Jacquemin, 2009), leurs mobilisations, pour être rares et emprunter des formes plurielles, sont-elles vouées à rester invisibles ? Non, sans aucun doute et Dominique Vidal (2007), analysant la situation des employées domestiques à Rio a montré de manière convaincante comment ces dernières sont au cœur même de la démocratie brésilienne.

Ce dossier invite aussi à considérer un contexte international nouveau, né de l’adoption d’outils normatifs portés par des agences onusiennes, et à s’interroger sur ses traductions. En juin 2011, l’Organisation Internationale du Travail a adopté la Convention n°189, encourageant les États à réglementer l’emploi domestique pour « étendre les droits fondamentaux du travail aux travailleurs domestiques dans le monde entier »[1].

Pour les plus jeunes travailleurs (parmi lesquels nombre de « petites bonnes » en Afrique), la ratification des conventions 138 et 182 de l’OIT relatives au travail des enfants tend à se généraliser dans les États africains, qui ont par ailleurs tous ratifié la Convention Internationale des Droits de l’Enfant, adoptée à l’ONU en 1989. En parallèle, des ONG et des associations ont multiplié leurs programmes en matière de protection de l’enfance ; alors que la ligne abolitionniste dominante entre parfois en tension avec certaines pratiques ou « revendications » des enfants travailleurs, certaines organisations sous la bannière du Mouvement Africain des Enfants et Jeunes Travailleurs ont en commun de donner voix à des travailleurs et travailleuses domestiques particulièrement déconsidérés par la société, et souvent oubliés dans le champ académique.

Objectifs

Tandis que la plupart des travaux actuels sur les « domestiques » s’inscrivent dans une approche globalisée de l’économie qui relie cette question à l’essor des migrations féminines Sud-Nord, ce dossier veut porter l’attention sur les domesticités africaines d’hier à aujourd’hui qui, malgré une composante migratoire forte à l’échelle interne ou intra-africaine et des mutations remarquables, sont restées dans l’ombre de transformations plus spectaculaires vues du Nord, comme celles liées aux migrations internationales ou au phénomène de traite des femmes et des enfants. À partir de nos travaux à sensibilités historienne et socio-ethnographique sur « le » domestique en Afrique, nous soutenons pour ce dossier l’intérêt d’étendre l’exploration des formes plurielles du service domestique en Afrique, ne serait-ce que pour donner continuité, via la question de la domesticité, au projet de « reconnecter les réflexions sur le lien entre ordre politique et ordre social, afin d’être capable de rendre compte de façon non culturaliste des façons par lesquelles il est possible et pensable de se faire entendre » (Siméant, 2013 : 141).

En interrogeant l’évolution des rapports de travail (passage de logiques familiales à des relations contractuelles de type salariale, spécialisation des tâches, formes de recrutement, liens de dépendance en continuité avec l’esclavage, prégnance des relations paternalistes, …), en analysant les relations quotidiennes au sein des maisonnées en termes de genre, de classe, de « race » ou d’âge, et comment celles-ci sont incarnées et transcrites dans les pratiques ou les discours voire dans l’espace, ou encore en décrivant les moyens qu’ont – ou n’ont pas – les domestiques de résister à la domination, nous voulons examiner la portée économique, politique et symbolique des changements à l’œuvre dans des contextes sociaux diversifiés, repérer au contraire des invariants et ce qu’ils disent, ou encore distinguer ce qui ressortirait de spécificités africaines, notamment relatives aux rapports de genre.

Envisagée comme outil transversal d’analyse, la perspective de genre est fortement invitée dans ce dossier : si l’ensemble des travaux montrent que le service domestique est, partout, socialement construit comme fonction subalterne définie en termes de genre, l’étude des domesticités en Afrique dans ses variations et ses évolutions est particulièrement fertile pour analyser les transformations potentielles des rapports de genre dominants – remise en cause ou consolidation. Centrale dans l’analyse des inégalités femmes/hommes en raison de sa composante majoritairement féminine, la domesticité en Afrique se décline parfois et jusqu’aujourd’hui spécifiquement au masculin (que l’on pense par exemple aux « boys » burkinabé d’Abidjan ou aux « ababuyi » de Bujumbura), nous invitant à examiner l’imbrication des différents rapports de domination.

Trois axes principaux pourront être explorés (mais d’autres entrées pourront être associées) :

  • Décrire, reconnaître, compter les domesticités en Afrique

Ce premier axe entend décrire les différentes formes du service domestique en Afrique, en variant les espaces mais aussi les moments. Il s’attachera à montrer la diversité et la pluralité des statuts d’emploi, des employeurs, des conditions et des situations de travail, etc.

Lorsqu’ils cherchent à typologiser le travail domestique, les chercheur.e.s sont confrontés à des difficultés de vocabulaire. En effet, la diversité des conditions n’est pas prise en compte par la terminologie ordinaire francophone (et anglophone). Les termes vernaculaires seront ainsi à étudier : à Madagascar par exemple, on observe un glissement de l’emploi du terme de boto (homme à tout faire, domestique) vers celui de mpanampy (celui qui aide).

S’ajoute une spécificité partagée par de nombreuses sociétés du continent africain, à savoir l’existence – passée ou encore actuelle – du statut (de descendant) d’esclave[2], mais aussi des pratiques de circulation (« confiage ») des enfants, qui maintiennent les individus dans des situations de dépendance voire de servitude (Jacquemin, 2000). La colonisation, en abolissant l’esclavage, n’a pas pour autant supprimé le statut social d’esclave et de descendant d’esclave et a laissé hors de toute régulation les emplois domestiques (Haskins, 2015). Le travail domestique est en effet souvent réalisé par des personnes exposées à diverses formes de vulnérabilité dans un contexte social donné, leur statut de travailleur n’étant pas toujours reconnu comme tel. Âge, sexe, origine géographique et sociale des domestiques seront ainsi des variables à prendre en compte ; on observe parfois des changements radicaux dans les main-d’œuvre employées : si Karen Hansen (1989) souligne que les domestiques étaient majoritairement des hommes en Zambie, à l’inverse, des années plus tard, ce sont des femmes qui exercent ces emplois (Hepburn, 2016).

  • Pluralité des normes

Ce deuxième axe veut aborder la question de la régulation du service domestique pour documenter la diversité des modalités de sa mise en œuvre : par l’Etat, par des « communautés » (familles, lignages, paroisses), par des acteurs privés (agences de placement, …) ou associatifs, etc. Il introduit la question de la pluralité des normes et de leurs dynamiques (Chauveau et al., 2001), envisagée au prisme des pratiques variées de service domestique, de la co-existence de normes formelles et informelles à diverses échelles et partant de « sources variées de légitimité ».

La formalisation plus ou moins grande du service domestique constituera ainsi un point à explorer, en lien avec l’encadrement progressif du travail par les États et la mise en place des systèmes de protection sociale : les domestiques cotisent-ils/elles par exemple pour une sécurité sociale ou des retraites ? Sont-ils/elles enregistrés dans les comptabilités nationales ? On pourra y adjoindre une réflexion sur la contractualisation du travail au cours du temps.

Continue de se poser plus ou moins explicitement la question de la reconnaissance économique du travail domestique qui, acquise de haute lutte dans plusieurs pays (Ibos, 2016), reste très incomplète en Afrique : on pourra en outre tenter d’en comprendre plus précisément le jeu des blocages ou des progressions selon les contextes socio-politiques. S’intéressant à l’implication des femmes domestiques dans la négociation de la Convention 189 de l’OIT sur le « Travail décent pour les travailleuses et travailleurs domestiques », Helen Schwenken rappelle ainsi que « la condition sine qua non à la mobilisation est la visibilité de ces femmes en tant que ‘travailleuses’ — et non en tant que ‘bonnes’ ou ‘servantes’ — ainsi que la reconnaissance du ménage privé comme lieu de travail » (Schwenken, 2011 : 114).

  • Mobiliser : acteurs/actrices et répertoires d’action

Avec l’objectif de mettre en questions les représentations de l’éternel consentement des domestiques, nous invitons aussi les auteur.e.s à explorer la notion d’économie morale à travers les expressions et les positions des travailleurs domestiques. Comme le suggère Johanna Siméant, il s’agit en particulier de s’interroger sur les manières de saisir les « formes latérales de dissentiment » (2013 : 136) et de « discerner l’expression du dissentiment dans ce qui ne propose pas forcément de programme politique articulé » (Siméant, 2010 : 150) : la question de la reproduction des positions sociales, du rapport à l’État et de l’expression du mécontentement sont alors centrales et leurs imbrications à approfondir.

Certes la domesticité ne saurait être abordée comme un bassin spécifique de militantisme, mais elle ne saurait non plus être soustraite totalement au champ des études sur l’action collective et les mobilisations, même si ces dernières prennent (ou prenaient) des formes d’expression et des moyens d’action différents et non habituels dans l’espace des mobilisations urbaines et ouvrières en Afrique, désormais bien documenté à travers la sociologie des mouvements sociaux qui s’est déployée sur le continent africain depuis une vingtaine d’années (Siméant, 2013 ; Tall et al., 2015).

À travers une micro-ethnographie des conflits ou une analyse plus classique des mouvements institutionnalisés, ce dernier axe veut interroger les registres possibles de mobilisation – individuelle (évitement, résistance à la routine, vol, action en justice, etc.) voire implicite, ou collective et publique (syndicats, associations, etc.) – que cette catégorie plurielle de travailleurs peut élaborer, dans une perspective à la fois historique, sociologique et anthropologique et dans des contextes variés. Quelles corrélations existe-t-il entre les transformations d’un groupe social et sa propension plus ou moins grande à se mobiliser ? Comment passe-t-on d’une résistance qui ne modifie pas les structures, à une action plus large qui sort proprement du cas individuel et de l’espace privé ? Dans le prolongement du dossier de Politique Africaine consacré au post-esclavage et aux mobilisations collectives (n°140, 2015/4), nous nous intéresserons ici aux mobilisations fondées sur la revendication d’un statut commun de travailleur : quels liens peut-il exister avec celles organisées autour d’une ascendance partagée (descendants d’esclaves) et avec des formes d’extraversion des luttes ? Dans quelles conditions passe-t-on de la reconnaissance sociale de l’activité de groupes subalternes – en l’occurrence des travailleurs domestiques – à une normalisation de leur participation à la citoyenneté et à la vie politique ?

Les propositions d’articles inédits (1 page) pourront être envoyées en français ou en anglais aux coordinatrices du dossier jusqu’au 4 décembre 2018.

melanie.jacquemin@ird.fr, violaine.tisseau@gmail.com

Calendrier

4 déc. 2018 : date limite d’envoi des propositions d’article (1 page max) aux coordinatrices du dossier

14 déc. 2018 : notification aux auteur.e.s des propositions retenues

15 mars 2019 : date limite d’envoi des articles (50 000 signes, espaces et notes compris) au comité de rédaction de la revue

Été 2019 : publication du dossier.

Références citées

Chauveau Jean-Pierre, Le Pape Marc, Olivier de Sardan Jean-Pierre, 2001, « La pluralité des normes et leurs dynamiques en Afrique : implications pour les politiques publiques », In : Winter Gérard (coord.). Inégalités et politiques publiques en Afrique : pluralité des normes et jeux d’acteurs, Paris : IRD/Karthala, p. 145-162.

Hansen Tranberg Karen, 1989, Distant Companions: Servants and Employers in Zambia, 1900-1985, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Haskins Victoria, 2015, Colonization and Domestic Service. Historical and Contemporary Perspectives, Oxford: Routledge.

Hepburn Sacha, 2016, “’Bringing a Girl from the Village: Gender, Child Migration and Domestic Service in Post-Colonial Zambia’, in Marie Rodet and Elodie Razy (eds), Children on the Move in Africa: Past and Present Experiences of Migration, Woodbridge: James Currey, p. 69-84.

Ibos Caroline, 2016, « Travail domestique/domesticité », Encyclopédie critique du genre. Corps, sexualité, rapports sociaux, Paris : La Découverte, p. 649-658.

Jacquemin Mélanie, 2000, « ‘Petites nièces’ et petites bonnes, le travail des fillettes en milieu urbain de Côte-d’Ivoire », Journal des Africanistes, 70 (1-2), p. 105-122.

Jacquemin Mélanie, 2009. “Invisible Young Female Migrant Workers: ‘Little Domestics’ in West Africa – Comparative Perspectives on Girls and Young Women’s Work”, Working Paper – Development Research Centre on Migration, Globalisation and Poverty/ University of Sussex, and Centre for Migration Studies/ University of Ghana, Accra. http://horizon.documentation.ird.fr/exl-doc/pleins_textes/divers16-06/010067209.pdf

Lautier Bruno, 1998. « Pour une sociologie de l’hétérogénéité du travail », Tiers-Monde, tome 39, n°154, p. 251-279.

Schwenken Helen, 2011. « Mobilisation des travailleuses domestiques migrantes : de la cuisine à l’Organisation internationale du travail », Cahiers du Genre 2/2011, 51, p. 113-133.

Siméant Johanna, 2010, « Économie morale » et protestation – détours africains », Genèses, 2010, 4, n° 81, p. 142-160.

Siméant Johanna, 2013, « Protester / mobiliser / ne pas consentir. Sur quelques avatars de la sociologie des mobilisations appliquée au continent africain », Revue internationale de politique comparée, 2013, 2, vol. 20, p. 125-143.

Tall Kadya, Pommerolle Marie-Emmanuelle, Cahen Michel, 2015, Collective Mobilisations in Africa / Mobilisations collectives en Afrique, Leiden : Brill.

Vidal Dominique, 2007, Les bonnes de Rio. Emploi domestique et société démocratique au Brésil, Villeneuve d’Ascq : Presses Universitaires du Septentrion.

[1] Convention n° 189 et Recommandation n°201 de l’OIT, sur le travail décent dans l’emploi domestique. Entrée en vigueur en septembre 2013, cette convention n’a été à ce jour ratifiée que par 25 pays ; sur le continent africain, seules l’Afrique du Sud et la Guinée comptent parmi eux ; au Sénégal par exemple, malgré des campagnes syndicales menées depuis 2011 et inscrites dans l’initiative internationale « 12 ratifications en 2012 », le gouvernement a laissé ce dossier en suspens.

[2] Sur ce point, le dossier ici proposé peut être envisagé comme un prolongement du dossier n° 140 de Politique Africaine (« La question de l’esclavage en Afrique : Politisation et mobilisations »), dont aucun texte n’abordait en particulier la question de la domesticité.

Les débats de Politique Africaine #1

Débats Mardi 11 septembre

18h30 > 20h30

« Restaurations autoritaires »?

Les débats de Politique africaine #1

La revue Politique africaine (https://polaf.hypotheses.org/la-revue) contribue depuis 30 ans à dé-exotiser une certaine perception académique occidentale du politique en Afrique. Grâce à un effort constant de renouveau du regard porté sur le continent, Politique africaine offre une lecture innovante de la place du politique dans les sociétés africaines, contribuant à une analyse plus fine des évolutions qui ont lieu en Afrique et dans ses rapports avec le reste du monde. A partir de la rentrée 2018, la revue va assurer en partenariat avec La Colonie une série de débats autour des différents thèmes portés à travers sa publication.

« Restaurations autoritaires » : L’expression est couramment invoquée et pourtant rarement définie. Comment rendre compte des recompositions politiques qui se déroulent, après des séquences d’effervescence pluraliste, sous le signe des « lendemains qui déchantent » ? Le numéro de la revue Politique africaine qui sera présenté défend l’idée que derrière le retour à l’ordre « des anciens », derrière l’unanimisme que le projet de restauration de façade semble façonner, demeurent des pratiques et des représentations politiques qui ne relèvent pas strictement de l’organisation du contrôle par les dirigeants de l’ancien régime.

Après une présentation du numéro à travers la contribution des différent.e.s intervenant.e.s (1h), le sujet sera débattu avec le public (1h)

Avec les coordinateurs du numéro, Amin Allal et Marie Vannetzel, chercheur.e.s au CNRS rattachés au Centre Universitaire de Recherches Administratives et Politiques de Picardie

Richard Banégas, professeur de science politique à l’IEP Paris

Assia Boutaleb, maîtresse de conférence en science politique à l’Université de Tours, auteure de la contribution au numéro intitulée « Quand l’élection (re)devient un plébiscite : La restauration autoritaire à l’aune du leadership politique en Égypte »

Laurence Ndong, militante de la campagne internationale « Tournons la page »

Site  Internet de l’évènement à La Colonie :

http://www.lacolonie.paris/agenda/les-debats-de-politique-africaine-1

Call for proposals: Health Matters in Africa. Interventions, Actors, Dynamics in the Era of Global Health

Coordinators: Fred Eboko, sociologist and political scientist, Research Director IRD (UMR 196 CEPED – Université Paris Descartes – IRD, fred.eboko@ird.fr) et Carine Baxerres, anthropologist, Senior Researcher l’IRD (UMR 216 MERIT – Université Paris Descartes – IRD, Centre Norbert Elias, carine.baxerres@ird.fr).

The last issue of Politique africaine to deal with the subject of health was published in December 1987.1  The goal of the present issue is to address what has occurred in the intervening thirty years and to highlight significant changes the public health sector has undergone in recent years.

Continuer la lecture de Call for proposals: Health Matters in Africa. Interventions, Actors, Dynamics in the Era of Global Health

  1. Didier Fassin ed., Politiques de santé, Politique africaine 28 (1987). []

Appel à contribution : L’Afrique en santé. Interventions, acteurs et dynamiques à l’ère de la « Global Health »

Dossier coordonné par Fred Eboko, sociologue et politiste, Directeur de Recherche  à l’IRD (UMR 196 CEPED – Université Paris Descartes – IRD, fred.eboko@ird.fr) et Carine Baxerres, anthropologue, Chargée de recherche à l’IRD (UMR 216 MERIT – Université Paris Descartes – IRD, Centre Norbert Elias, carine.baxerres@ird.fr)

Le dernier numéro de Politique africaine sur la santé date de décembre 19871. Cette proposition de dossier vise à combler un vide de près de 30 ans et à rendre compte des changements considérables qu’a connu récemment l’univers de la santé publique en Afrique.

Continuer la lecture de Appel à contribution : L’Afrique en santé. Interventions, acteurs et dynamiques à l’ère de la « Global Health »

  1. Didier Fassin, (sous la direction de), Politiques de santé, Politique africaine, n°28, décembre, 1987. []

« On ne mange pas les ponts et le goudron » : les sentiers sinueux d’une sortie de crise en Côte d’Ivoire

Introduction au dossier N° 148, parFrancis Akindès

Les élections de 2010 en Côte d’Ivoire et les violences électorales 1  qui leur ont succédé ont engendré une profonde crise socio-politique et engagé le pays dans un nouvel épisode de son histoire politique. Comme les deux faces d’une même monnaie, les ressorts de ce nouvel épisode sont : la victoire au forceps d’Alassane Ouattara sur fond de confrontation militaire et l’éviction du champ politique de Laurent Gbagbo à la suite de son arrestation, puis de son transfèrement le 19 novembre 2011 à La Haye pour répondre des chefs d’accusation de crimes de guerre et de crimes contre l’humanité pendant la crise post-électorale. Cette situation politique a contribué à cliver davantage la société ivoirienne. C’est dans ce contexte que le nouveau président ivoirien, dans son discours d’investiture, dit vouloir « faire définitivement le deuil de nos rancœurs, […] nos plaies, […] expier les fautes individuelles et collectives » et promet « d’écrire une nouvelle page de l’histoire de notre pays 2 ».

Continuer la lecture de « On ne mange pas les ponts et le goudron » : les sentiers sinueux d’une sortie de crise en Côte d’Ivoire

  1. S. Straus, « “It’s Sheer Horror Here” : Patterns of Violence During the First Four Months of Côte d’Ivoire Post-Electoral Crise », African Affairs, vol. 110, n° 440, 2011, p. 481-489. []
  2. Cérémonie d’investiture, Discours du président de la République SEM Alassane Ouattara [en ligne], 21 mai 2011, <http://www.gouv.ci/doc/Discours_Investiture.pdf>, consulté le 9 mars 2018. []

Derrière le sport et les pratiques ludomotrices. Subjectivation et mobilisation par le corps en Afrique subsaharienne

Introduction au thème au thème du numéro 147, paru le 03/2017, sous la coordination de Thomas Riot et Nicolas Bancel, page 5 à 22.

Kigali (Nyamirambo), le 12 septembre 2007. Nous descendons la route vers le centre de la capitale rwandaise et nous nous arrêtons devant un bâtiment situé en retrait du bitume. Il abrite une association culturelle qui développe des activités artistiques. Nous assistons à une démonstration de danse guerrière. Un groupe d’une quinzaine de jeunes garçons et de jeunes filles se montre très fier d’esquisser une série de pas cadencés, entrecoupés de saltations, d’attaques, d’esquives et de retraits avec lesquels – selon les mots de leur éducateur – ils « font renaître le Rwanda1 ». Nous demandons à leur « maître » quel est le mouvement de danse le plus important à acquérir. L’homme attrape un bâton de bois qui lui sert de « lance », se met au centre de la scène et adopte un sourire belliqueux. Il initie son mouvement à partir des jambes : grâce à une légère flexion de celles-ci, il place son bassin en antéversion. La courbure du dos que provoque cette action lui permet de bomber la poitrine. Il positionne ensuite ses mains de part en part de ses cuisses tandis que ses bras adoptent un angle de fléchissement similaire à celui de ses genoux. Nous focalisons notre regard sur la main qui tient la « lance », et observons une flexion de celle-ci immédiatement suivie d’un mouvement de supination de la « main-lance ». De fait, la main et la lance se trouvent couplées par la mise en œuvre d’une seule et même action que le danseur réalise sans avoir recours aux articulations de son coude 2. Continuer la lecture de Derrière le sport et les pratiques ludomotrices. Subjectivation et mobilisation par le corps en Afrique subsaharienne

  1. L’expression a été quasiment institutionnalisée dans le « nouveau Rwanda », soit depuis 1994 et la prise de pouvoir du Front patriotique rwandais (FPR). Elle désigne la politique de reconstruction sociale, économique et politique du pays après le massacre des Tutsi (entre les mois d’avril et de juillet 1994). Lire à ce sujet S. Straus et L. Waldorf (dir.), Remaking Rwanda. State Builiding and Human Rights after Mass Violence, Madison, University of Wisconsin Press, 2011. []
  2. Chose impossible à réaliser pour un non-initié. []

N°147 – La forge corporelle du politique

Des temps précoloniaux à nos jours, les sociétés d’Afrique subsaharienne ont forgé des savoirs corporels, parmi lesquels les pratiques sportives et ludomotrices (scoutisme, danses guerrières, lutte, football…) tiennent une place importante. Diffusées par de nombreuses organisations politiques, culturelles et pédagogiques, elles participent de politiques de (re)construction des corps destinées à renforcer, à infléchir ou à défier les institutions au pouvoir. Suivant une démarche ethnographique et sociohistorique, les auteurs de ce numéro soulignent la dialectique qui entrecroise cette « politique du survêtement » aux processus de subjectivation politique et de mobilisation sociale et combattante : des corps « sportifs », « vaillants », « travailleurs » et « guerriers » sont ainsi formés, docilisés, surveillés et contrôlés, mais aussi émancipés au sein de processus plus globaux, teintés de transferts matériels, sociaux et politiques, de branchements transnationaux et de formation inconsciente des sujets de l’État.

SOMMAIRE

Le Dossier : La forge corporelle du politique

Page 5 à 22 –  Introduction au thème,  Derrière le sport et les pratiques ludomotrices. Subjectivation et mobilisation par le corps en Afrique subsaharienne, par Thomas Riot, Nicolas Bancel

Lire l’intégralité de l’introduction sur Cairn 

Page 23 à 43 – Par le corps et pour l’État : l’itorero et les techniques réflexives du corps au Rwanda, par Molly Sundberg, Traduction Marie-Aude Fouéré 

Lire le résumé sur Cairn 

Page 45 à 63 – Corps travaillés dans la lutte. Fabriquer des lutteurs de làmb à Dakar, par Francesco Fanoli

Lire le résumé sur Cairn 

Page 65 à 86 – Du « Mess des officiers » à « Haleluya FC » : politiques du corps, pratique sportive et inflexion de l’héritage nationaliste au Burundi, par Désiré Manirakiza

Lire le résumé sur Cairn 

Page 87 à 107 – Des corps connectés : les Ghana Young Pioneers, tête de proue de la mondialisation du nkrumahisme (1960-1966), par Claire Nicolas

Lire le résumé sur Cairn 

Page 109 à 134 – Un art guerrier aux frontières des Grands Lacs. Aux racines dansées du Front patriotique rwandais, par Thomas Riot, Nicolas Bancel, Paul Rutayisire

Lire le résumé sur Cairn 

Recherches

Page 135 à 157 – Les courtiers-producteurs du développement agricole : Tabaculture et différenciation sociale en zone rurale au Malawi, par Paul Grassin

Lire le résumé sur Cairn 

Page 171 à 187 – Revue des livres 

CFP_Taxation, formality and informality in contemporary Africa

Call for Papers

 Taxation, formality and informality in contemporary Africa

 Special issue coordinated by Olly Owen
(Research Fellow, Oxford Department of International Development)

 This call for papers invites submissions from anyone working on taxation in revenue in Africa in ways which deals either directly or indirectly with the duality of formal and informal actors, institutions and practices. In recent years, many African states have redirected their attention to reforming and maximising internal revenue, especially as global natural resource prices and global aid flows become increasingly unpredictable. This move has been followed by increased donor support for such programmes, and a renewal of scholarly attention to the issues these developments bring out. Continuer la lecture de CFP_Taxation, formality and informality in contemporary Africa

AAC Fiscalité en Afrique contemporaine: formalités et informalités

Appel à contribution

Fiscalité en Afrique contemporaine: formalités et informalités

 Coordonné par Olly Owen
(Chargé de recherche, Oxford Department of International Development)

 Cet appel à contribution souhaite recueillir les propositions d’auteurs s’intéressant aux politiques fiscales des États africains et qui abordent dans leurs travaux, de manière directe ou indirecte, la dualité du formel et de l’informel au niveau des acteurs, des institutions ou des pratiques en matière de fiscalité. Au cours des dernières années, de nombreux États africains ont orienté leurs efforts dans le sens d’une réforme et d’une maximisation des recettes fiscales, pour faire face en particulier à l’imprévisibilité croissante des prix des ressources naturelles sur les marchés mondiaux et des flux de l’aide internationale. Cette initiative a été soutenue par une aide accrue des bailleurs en faveur de tels programmes. Elle a également renouvelé l’attention des chercheurs vis-à-vis de ces développements et des enjeux qui leur sont associés. Continuer la lecture de AAC Fiscalité en Afrique contemporaine: formalités et informalités

Le carnet de la revue