Archives de catégorie : Actualités

CFP_Taxation, formality and informality in contemporary Africa

Call for Papers

 Taxation, formality and informality in contemporary Africa

 Special issue coordinated by Olly Owen
(Research Fellow, Oxford Department of International Development)

 This call for papers invites submissions from anyone working on taxation in revenue in Africa in ways which deals either directly or indirectly with the duality of formal and informal actors, institutions and practices. In recent years, many African states have redirected their attention to reforming and maximising internal revenue, especially as global natural resource prices and global aid flows become increasingly unpredictable. This move has been followed by increased donor support for such programmes, and a renewal of scholarly attention to the issues these developments bring out.

One such concern is the meeting point between domains, practices and institutional forms which have state- and non-state origins. Tax and fiscal governance systems across the African continent feature a varied array of relationships between the formal and informal. In some places, states engaged in reconstructing formal taxation systems have seen non-state revenue collectors as competitors to be erased and displaced. In other times and places, state actors have found it impossible to operate the formal system except with the assistance of non-state actors (or state actors acting in other roles) as intermediaries (Joshi and Ayee 2008). These negotiated collaborations may in turn be seen, either emically or analytically, as transitory compromises or as initial stages in a more institutionalised arrangement, as in the profile given in recent years to ‘hybrid governance’ arrangements (Meagher, De Herdt and Titeca 2014). In some places, the two modes coexist and compete within the field of everyday governance practices or as Roitman (2005) explored, the state system may be itself thoroughly informalised, its bureaucracy outwardly the same but redirected to a different logic. Even in the most bureaucratic systems, personal nuance and exceptionalism becomes important at the level of implementation, in ways which defy categories such as ‘corruption’ and remind us of the continuing importance of affect in brokering many everyday modes of governance (see Hornberger 2004 for a comparable example), or of the importance of balancing governance with political feasibility (see Moore & Piracha 2016) for an example of the link between taxation, statecraft and statehood from Asia.  And the influence of the ‘informal’ in the form of non-state practices, norms, institutions or agendas may be most heavily present either where governmental systems engage with grassroots mass society and its organisational forms (Gatt & Owen, forthcoming) or the opposite, the elite level where particularist or personal factors influence implementation (Goodfellow 2017).

It also highlights a focus on what engagement with the state means at different scales. Self-levying membership organisations which act on behalf of the state might make relatively small material contributions to it even while appropriating its symbolic power (as has been explored from a governance perspective by Fourchard & Albert 2003).

A second aspect is the effect of changing taxation procedures, and their political and social meaning. Revenue invokes regulation, so within tax reform, bureaucratisation and increasing technologisation reifies forms of knowledge and representation, even in basic fields of social life such as place-naming and street-naming practices, moving from socially embedded usages to registered and standardised labels.  In contexts where state governance has broken down or withdrawn, taxation is one of the state-like functions which non-formal governance actors take on it their attempts to consolidate, institutionalise and gain legitimacy and acceptance, whether this is willingly ‘outsourced’ by governments to private-sector or socially-embedded intermediaries, or usurped by political entrepreneurs, militants or rebels. Or, both state and non-state authorities might creatively play with revenue systems, by turns embracing or distancing from official institutions and policies, making revenue a part of the play with boundaries which frequently characterises other modes of rule such as security provision (Tapscott, 2017).

A third focus might be changing roles of taxation in the formation of a social contract and sense of public legitimacy for particular political orders. In many places, taxation systems and practices draw on long histories, articulating deeply-held social concepts which incorporate both governmental and communal ideas of civic duty and social contract. Taxation also connects directly to moral ideas of citizenship, belonging and entitlement which dictate who gets political voice and who is allocated public goods (Meagher, 2016). And in all these situations, rule and revenue can be either a part of a complex of accountability and service delivery, or more unambiguously extractive. Moreover, close examinations of the everyday working of taxation systems, and the logics behind them, provide powerful grounds to critique the division between formal and non-formal or state and non-state itself, either as being of diminishing analytical meaning, or as being itself a constructed imaginary which is part of techniques of rule, social structuring and governmental control (Mitchell 1999, Roy 2005). However commonplace that observation may be, the really interesting issue is the variety of configurations produced, and therefore what a focus on taxation can tell us about the forms of state-society relations and sovereignty which have been chosen or which have emerged across the African continent.

Themes

 Submissions are invited from any single discipline or mixed methodology which incorporates some element of qualitative analysis, including but not limited to anthropology, sociology, history and political economy. The call is particularly interested in the linkages between structure and practice, policy and implementation, emergent trend and changing understandings, so submissions which deal only with abstracted overviews, structural changes or top-down analyses are unlikely to be considered.

 Within that, your paper might engage with any of the following themes:  Policy and institutional form; mediation and brokerage; street-level practices of enforcement and collection; non-state governance; reciprocity, responsibility, legitimacy and social contract; recording and knowledge production; state-building and fiscal practices; taxing people, natural resources, activities or services; state capacity, technocrats, technology and innovation; the political limits of possibility; governmental and public notions of legitimacy; tracing the roots of taxation practices; ‘shadow’ and ‘twilight’ institutions; or any other themes directly relevant to the relationship between the formal and informal within taxation.

Your focus or case might be a country or region, a bureaucracy, a social or economic institution, a value-chain, commodity or trade route, a practice or type of payment, a group of state actors or a particular technology and its uses; above all, this call is interested in your interpretation of what constitutes the object of study.

 Calendar

January 15, 2018: Deadline for submission of proposals (1 page summary) to Olly Owen (oliver.owen@qeh.ox.ac.uk)

January 29, 2018: Notification of acceptance to the selected authors

April 15, 2018: Deadline for sending draft articles to the editorial board (50,000 characters including spaces and footnotes)

May-August 2018: Evaluation, revision and (where necessary) translation of the texts selected by the editorial board of the journal

The special issue will be published in October 2018. Submissions can be sent in English or French. The final publication will be in French.

 

Bibliography

 De Herdt, T, Meagher, K. and Titeca K. Unravelling public authority: paths of hybrid governance in Africa IS Academy Research Brief 10, 2014. http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/79860/1/Unravelling%20Public%20Authority_%20Paths%20of%20Hybrid%20Governance%20in%20Africa%20_%20Justice%20and%20Security%20Research%20Programme.pdf

Fourchard, L and Albert, I.  Security, crime and segregation in West African cities since the 19th century.  Ibadan: IFRA/Karthala, 2003.

Gatt, L. & Owen, O. (forthcoming) The Impact of Direct Taxation on State-Society Relations in Lagos, Nigeria, Development & Change. 2018.

Goodfellow, T. Taxing property in a neo-developmental state: The Politics of urban land value capture in Rwanda and Ethiopia. African Affairs, 2017.

Hornberger, Julia. “My police — your police”: the informal privatisation of the police in the inner city of Johannesburg , African Studies, 63:2, 2004, 213-230

Joshi, A. and J. Ayee. Associational Taxation: A Pathway into the Informal Sector. In: D. Brautigam, O.-H. Fjeldstad and M. Moore (eds.), Taxation and State-Building in Developing Countries. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2008.

Meagher, Kate. Taxing times: taxation, divided societies and the informal economy in Northern Nigeria. Journal of Development Studies, 2016, pp. 1-17

Mitchell, T.  ‘Society, Economy and the State Effect’ in Sharma and Gupta (eds) The Anthropology of the State Oxford: Blackwell. 2006 [1999].

Moore, M. & Mujtaba Piracha. Revenue-Maximising or Revenue-Sacrificing Government? Property Tax in Pakistan, The Journal of Development Studies, 52:12, 2016, 1776-1790.

Roy, Ananya Urban Informality: Toward an Epistemology of Planning, Journal of the American Planning Association, 71:2, 2005, 147-158,

Roitman, Janet. Fiscal disobedience: an anthropology of economic regulation in Central Africa. Princeton, NJ ; Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2005.

AAC Fiscalité en Afrique contemporaine: formalités et informalités

Appel à contribution

Fiscalité en Afrique contemporaine: formalités et informalités

 Coordonné par Olly Owen
(Chargé de recherche, Oxford Department of International Development)

 Cet appel à contribution souhaite recueillir les propositions d’auteurs s’intéressant aux politiques fiscales des États africains et qui abordent dans leurs travaux, de manière directe ou indirecte, la dualité du formel et de l’informel au niveau des acteurs, des institutions ou des pratiques en matière de fiscalité. Au cours des dernières années, de nombreux États africains ont orienté leurs efforts dans le sens d’une réforme et d’une maximisation des recettes fiscales, pour faire face en particulier à l’imprévisibilité croissante des prix des ressources naturelles sur les marchés mondiaux et des flux de l’aide internationale. Cette initiative a été soutenue par une aide accrue des bailleurs en faveur de tels programmes. Elle a également renouvelé l’attention des chercheurs vis-à-vis de ces développements et des enjeux qui leur sont associés.

L’un des principaux thèmes de recherche concerne le point de rencontre entre des domaines, des pratiques et des formes institutionnelles ayant des origines étatiques et non-étatiques. L’impôt et la gouvernance fiscale présentent un éventail étendu d’articulations entre le formel et l’informel. Parfois, les États engagés dans la reconstruction du système fiscal formel ont considéré les percepteurs non étatiques comme des concurrents à éliminer et à supplanter. Ailleurs, ou à d’autres époques, il a été impossible pour les acteurs étatiques de faire fonctionner le système formel sans l’assistance d’acteurs non-étatiques (ou d’acteurs étatiques agissant dans l’exercice d’autres fonctions) en tant qu’intermédiaires (Joshi and Ayee 2008).

Ces collaborations négociées peuvent être perçues en retour, d’un point de vue émique ou analytique, comme des compromis transitoires ou comme les premières étapes de dispositifs plus institutionnels, comme le montre l’importance donnée ces dernières années aux modalités de la « gouvernance hybride » (Meagher, De Herdt and Titeca 2014). En certains endroits, les deux modes coexistent et entrent en compétition dans le cadre des pratiques quotidiennes de la gouvernance. Ou, comme Roitman l’a montré (2005), le système étatique peut être lui-même profondément informalisé, en conservant son apparence bureaucratique mais en étant redéployé dans une tout autre logique. Même dans les systèmes les plus bureaucratiques, la personnalisation et l’exceptionnalisme prennent toute leur importance au moment de la mise en œuvre de ces politiques, défiant alors les catégories comme la « corruption » et nous rappelant l’importance continue de l’affect dans la médiation des modes de gouvernance ordinaires (à titre de comparaison, voir Hornberger 2004), ou l’importance de pondérer la gouvernance avec la faisabilité politique (voir Moore & Piracha 2016 pour un exemple asiatique du lien entre fiscalisation, arts de gouverner et contours de l’État). Et l’influence de « l’informel » dans des pratiques, normes, institutions et projets non-étatiques peut se faire sentir aussi bien là où le système gouvernemental s’investit dans les secteurs de base de la société et ses formes organisationnelles au niveau local (Gatt & Owen, à paraître), ou, au contraire, au niveau des élites, où des facteurs personnels ou particularistes influencent la mise en œuvre des politiques publiques (Goodfellow 2017). Cela met l’accent sur ce que l’interaction avec l’État signifie à différentes échelles. Les organisations agissant pour le compte de l’État peuvent faire de maigres contributions matérielles à l’État bien qu’elles s’approprient son pouvoir symbolique (comme cela a été montré à travers une perspective de gouvernance par Fourchard & Albert 2003).

Un second point important concerne l’impact des modifications de procédures fiscales et leur signification politique et sociale. L’impôt implique une certaine régulation. Par conséquent, au sein de la réforme fiscale, la bureaucratisation et la technologisation croissante réifient des formes de savoirs et des représentations, y compris dans les aspects basiques de la vie sociale tel que dans le choix de noms de lieux ou de rues, passant d’usages socialement ancrés à des labels officiels et standardisés. Dans les contextes où la gouvernance d’État s’est effondrée ou  rétractée, la fiscalisation est l’une des fonctions s’apparentant à l’État que les acteurs de la gouvernance informelle occupent pour tenter de consolider, institutionnaliser et accroitre leur légitimité sociale, que cela soit externalisé volontairement par les gouvernements au secteur privé ou à des intermédiaires sociaux, ou usurpé par des entrepreneurs politiques, des militants ou des rebelles. Une autre modalité possible consiste à ce que l’État et les autorités non-étatiques jouent de manière créative avec le système fiscal, en acceptant ou se distanciant tout à tour des institutions et des politiques officielles, faisant ainsi de l’impôt une de ces zones grises ou de frontière qui caractérisent fréquemment d’autres modes de gouvernement comme celui de la sécurité (Tapscott, 2017).

Un troisième axe de recherche s’intéresse au rôle changeant de la fiscalité dans la formation d’un contrat social et d’un sens de la légitimité publique dans des ordres politiques particuliers. En de nombreux endroits, les pratiques et les systèmes fiscaux s’appuient sur des histoires longues, articulant des concepts profondément ancrés socialement qui incluent à la fois des perceptions gouvernementales et communautaires du devoir civique et du contrat social. La fiscalisation est directement liée également aux conceptions morales de la citoyenneté, de l’appartenance et des droits sur la base desquelles l’on détermine qui détient une voix politique et à qui on attribue des biens publics (Meagher, 2016). Dans toutes ces situations, l’exercice du pouvoir et les recettes fiscales peuvent faire partie soit d’un complexe d’imputabilité (accountability) et de fourniture de services, ou d’une dynamique plus clairement extractive. De plus, un examen approfondi du travail quotidien des systèmes fiscaux, et des logiques qui les régissent, permet de remettre en question la division entre le formel et l’informel, l’étatique et le non-étatique, soit parce que cet examen en affaiblit la portée analytique, soit parce que cette distinction est elle-même un imaginaire construit faisant partie des techniques de gouvernement, de la structuration sociale et du contrôle gouvernemental (Mitchell 1999, Roy 2005). Même si ce dernier point peut paraître évident, le véritable sujet d’intérêt ici consiste dans la variété des configurations produites et donc dans ce qu’un accent mis sur la fiscalisation peut nous dire des nouvelles modalités de relations entre État et société ainsi que des nouvelles formes de souveraineté qui émergent sur le continent africain.

 Thèmes

 Les contributeurs de toute discipline ou de méthodologie mixte, que ce soit en particulier (mais pas seulement) en anthropologie, sociologie, histoire ou économie politique – dans la mesure où ils incluent des éléments d’analyse qualitative – sont invités à soumettre une proposition. Ce dossier s’intéresse particulièrement aux articulations entre la structure et la pratique, les politiques publiques et leur mise en œuvre, etc. Les soumissions qui ne s’intéressent qu’à des vues d’ensemble abstraites, des changements structurels ou des analyses par le haut ne seront pas retenues.

 A l’intérieur de ces limites, les articles pourront traiter de l’un des thèmes suivants : politiques publiques et formes institutionnelles ; médiation et courtage ; pratiques fiscales « de la rue » ; gouvernance non-étatique ; réciprocité, responsabilité, légitimité et contrat social ; enregistrement et production de savoirs ; construction de l’État et pratiques fiscales ; fiscalisation des personnes, des ressources naturelles, des activités ou des services ;capacité étatique, technocrates, technologie et innovation ; les limites politiques du champ des possibles ; les conceptions gouvernementale et publique de la légitimité ;la généalogie des pratiques fiscales ; les institutions de l’ombre ou de l’entre-deux (twilight) ; ou tout autre thème pertinent pour comprendre la relation entre le formel et l’informel en matière de fiscalisation.

L’accent peut être mis sur un pays ou une région, une bureaucratie, une institution économique et ou sociale, une chaine de valeur, les marchandises ou routes commerciales, une pratique ou un type de paiement, un groupe d’acteurs étatiques ou une technologie particulière et ses usages. Mais surtout, ce dossier s’intéresse à l’interprétation que font les auteurs de ce qui constitue l’objet de cette étude.

 

Calendrier

15 janvier 2018 : Date limité d’envoi des propositions (résumé d’une page) au coordinateur (Olly Owen (oliver.owen@qeh.ox.ac.uk))

29 janvier 2018 : notification aux auteurs des propositions retenues

15 avril 2018 : Date limite denvoi des articles retenus au le comité de rédaction de la revue (50 000 signes, espaces et notes de bas de page compris)

Mai-août 2018 : Evaluation, révisions et (si nécessaire) traduction des textes sélectionnés par le comité de rédaction de la revue.

 

Le numéro sera publié en Octobre 2018. Les propositions peuvent être envoyées en français ou en anglais. La publication finale sera en français.

 

Bibliographie

 De Herdt, T, Meagher, K. and Titeca K. Unravelling public authority: paths of hybrid governance in Africa IS Academy Research Brief 10, 2014. http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/79860/1/Unravelling%20Public%20Authority_%20Paths%20of%20Hybrid%20Governance%20in%20Africa%20_%20Justice%20and%20Security%20Research%20Programme.pdf

Fourchard, L and Albert, I.  Security, crime and segregation in West African cities since the 19th century.  Ibadan: IFRA/Karthala, 2003.

Gatt, L. & Owen, O. (forthcoming) The Impact of Direct Taxation on State-Society Relations in Lagos, Nigeria, Development & Change. 2018.

Goodfellow, T. Taxing property in a neo-developmental state: The Politics of urban land value capture in Rwanda and Ethiopia. African Affairs, 2017.

Hornberger, Julia. “My police — your police”: the informal privatisation of the police in the inner city of Johannesburg , African Studies, 63:2, 2004, 213-230

Joshi, A. and J. Ayee. Associational Taxation: A Pathway into the Informal Sector. In: D. Brautigam, O.-H. Fjeldstad and M. Moore (eds.), Taxation and State-Building in Developing Countries. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2008.

Meagher, Kate. Taxing times: taxation, divided societies and the informal economy in Northern Nigeria. Journal of Development Studies, 2016, pp. 1-17

Mitchell, T.  ‘Society, Economy and the State Effect’ in Sharma and Gupta (eds) The Anthropology of the State Oxford: Blackwell. 2006 [1999].

Moore, M. & Mujtaba Piracha. Revenue-Maximising or Revenue-Sacrificing Government? Property Tax in Pakistan, The Journal of Development Studies, 52:12, 2016, 1776-1790.

Roy, Ananya Urban Informality: Toward an Epistemology of Planning, Journal of the American Planning Association, 71:2, 2005, 147-158,

Roitman, Janet. Fiscal disobedience: an anthropology of economic regulation in Central Africa. Princeton, NJ ; Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2005.

Cameroon: the stationary State

Cameroon: the stationary State

Guest editors:

Fred Eboko & Patrick Awondo

PolitiqueAfricaine_CFP_Cameroon_Stationary state

In 1986, Politique africaine dedicated a dossier to the “awakening of Cameroon” and analysed the consequences of the 1984 political crisis in the aftermath of a coup attempt against the then young President Paul Biya (Bayart, 1986). A decade later, in 1996, the same journal pondered on the effects of “democratisation” that had plunged Cameroon into a « no man’s land » (Sindjoun and Courade, 1996). The dossier threw light on the « scars » and broken lines in a country rife with tensions, and where part of the « unfinished business » in the colonial years (Mbembé, 1996), through the Anglophone question, was still interfering with the present.

Since then, the « demobilisation » of the political opposition movements of the 1990s (Pomerolle, 2008, Eboussi, 1997), or the « renewal without revival » of the political elite (Eboko, 1999) during a « transition that did not take place » (Mehler, 1997) has combined with endemic corruption (Abéga, 2007) to keep the country in a state of hibernation. While the signs of implosion often loom large and observers keep announcing Cameroon’s dislocation since the 1990s (see International Crisis Group, 2010a, 2010b, 2014, 2015), Paul Biya’s regime has survived through successive adaptive processes. Whether characterised as « under-developed » (Médard, 1977), « neo-patrimonial » (Médard, 1979), « authoritarian » (Mbembé, 2001), « post authoritarian » (Pomerolle, 2008), « wizardly » (Geschiere, 1995) or simply « absent » (Pigeaud, 2011), the regime has thwarted all prognoses for three decades. This resilience the regime has mustered by force and way of deception seems to confirm Bayart’s Gramscian hypothesis on the continuity of the « hegemonic bloc » (Bayart, 1989), whose apparent vulnerability contrasts with a life expectancy President Biya described recently as: « power lasts not for those who want, but those who can ». This “State from elsewhere” deserves analysis also on its « periphery », which relativizes the power in Yaounde’s command centre (Sindjoun, 2002), to propose approaches for unpacking “local” political complexities amid the generalized imbalance of the territory, the localized regional claims, and political control over « passive revolutions » (Bayart, 1989).

Although this central African nation was one of the most studied in Africanist social sciences between 1970 and 1990, its relative political stability, unending agony and the anomic nature of its social and economic life have impaired a revival of political, social and economic thinking in the last decade. With Cameroon espousing the profile of a country torn linguistically between French and English, researchers have difficulty to dialogue1. This dossier attempts to rise above the « francophone/anglophone » divide and associate the two trends in intellectual and scientific production around one and the same discussion.

This task becomes even more pressing because of two topical issues: the return of the Anglophone question to the national and international public arena in 2016, and the emergence of a terror front masterminded by Boko Haram in ways that have been destabilizing part of the country’s northern regions since 2014. Alongside these two challenges, the presidential elections are due in 2018 and could be the last for the incumbent, should he decide to run. Paradoxically, a close look at the situation in Cameroon shows that the authorities at Etoudi have come out stronger, rather than weaker from these situations. They benefit, on one side, from the counter-terrorism mechanism which provides for regime of exception and strengthens social control, while, on the other, making it easier to govern a territory divided by « ethno-political exclusion » (Roessler, 2016; Bayart, Geschiere and Nyanmjoh, 2001). Consequently, the centre of power in Yaounde seems to have become more popular in public opinion in Eastern Cameroon, despite the claims made at the international level by part of the English-speaking political minority, for it has succeeded to position itself as the ultimate bulwark against the dual threat posed by Boko Haram’s « terrorists » and opponents the president himself refers to as « sorcerer’s apprentices » who want to divide Cameroon. This major line of argument feeds on conspiracy theory and plots, which have spread beyond any measure of common sense and make Cameroon look, rightly or wrongly, like a country that invents enemies for itself whenever it cannot rise above the bonded freedoms and endless social coma in the domestic landscape. What can we make of these moments of crisis and what do they tell us about the state of Cameroon? How can these breaches opening up in Cameroon’s dormant landscape help us rethink the dynamics in this country?

This dossier offers some insights on how to read contemporary Cameroon through a range of different lenses in order to explain the apparent tension between a state we will refer to as « stationary » and transformations in the exercise of power that are taking place behind a façade of inaction. It is the way we use to look at how contemporary historical issues around security are coupled with local government mechanisms by evoking fear and « worry » (Bigo, 2005). The question then is, how are initiatives to refocus the debate on social issues and democracy being neutralized under the guise of the fight against terrorism or the crusade against corruption?

Two moments are quite important in what public commentators call « transformations in continuity » in the exercise of power in Cameroon. First, there is the « fight against corruption », initiated in 2004 as Cameroon was striving to reach completion point in eligibility for the « Highly Indebted Poor Country” (HIPC) initiative of the IMF and the World Bank. The Bretton Woods institutions could not have imagined they had offered an opportunity to the Yaounde regime. The crusade that the Biya regime unleashed thereafter led to the arrest of some of the top dignitaries of the ruling party, Cameroon People’s Democratic Movement (CPDM), including some of those in high office. From the Prime Minister to the Minister of Finance, the Minister of Health, the Secretary General of the Presidency of the Republic and the General Manager of the National Airline, « Operation Sparrow Hawk » (L’opération épervier) cracked down on several top officials. Labelled with the name of a familiar bird of prey, this extensive operation itself became a method of conducting local governance through threats and blackmail about arrests. The initiative therefore enabled the system to intensify the control it had over all the social forces in the country. While the names of “arrestable” public figures made newspaper headlines (Awondo, 2012) alongside other events, corruption continued to be a fundamental problem across the society, and one that was recognized as such in the highest echelons of the State.

Moreover, Boko Haram’s attacks, which the regime calls a « terrorist threat », have made it possible to revive the security machine and prohibit mass public organisation. The Penal Code adopted in 2016 seems, in this light, to be a political instrument for countering Boko Haram, and also for limiting demonstrations and other public gatherings. It has since become increasingly difficult or even dangerous to raise social questions without appearing to be a threat to public security or to be engaging in « terrorist » activity.

We nonetheless submit the hypothesis that underneath this stationary state, new dynamics are at work inside Cameroon. It is precisely by studying such dynamics that this dossier will attempt to elucidate how the momentum of change is now operating in this country where people openly claim that « one does not change the means by which change happened ». What are the elements that can help us understand the mechanisms by which the head of state maintains control over the elite and continues to hang on to power? What are the linkages between economic obligations based on extraversion and the disaggregation of political staff at the national level? What is the ethos that underpins the maintenance of political order in an increasingly enfeebled social context? What ties exist between the « terrorist threat » and other dynamics pertaining to intergenerational debates and the role of the diaspora, for example, which raises strong mistrust? Our responses to these questions will focus on the following three areas:

  1. New crises” and rule of law in Cameroon

In the current context, the « Anglophone question » and the « terrorist threat » offer original and enlightening entry points into two dimensions of the situation in Cameroon. On one hand, there are activities to protect the rule of law; while, on the other, there are techniques and methods used, sometimes beyond or in spite of constitutional order, to counteract actors in a crisis with the potential to cause an implosion of the society. Concretely, one may assume that the adoption of a new penal code and a new code of criminal procedures in 2016, for example, was intended to respond to the former, while the redeployment of a legal and security arsenal, the aggiornamento of techniques and methods to tighten the grip of power over the whole of society, was dedicated to the latter.

The point here, therefore, is to look at the latest political and social events in Cameroon, not as a moment of abrupt change, but as the entry point to a re-problematisation process, during which public power is put to the test on values for the rule of law and democratic principles. In exploring matters pertaining to the rule of law in Cameroon, the dossier attempts to underline just how far this issue has been transformed in its formulation depending on the critical moments and events happening internally (tensions around penal code reform, freedom of the press, etc.) or externally (Boko Haram attacks and raids along the borders of Cameroon).

There is need to once again explore the different pathways that have been used to shape and reinvent debate and discourse around democratic construction. The « new crises » would then be an analyser of power relations (Foucault, 2013) that makes it possible to reveal in a new light what seems to be buried in Cameroon’s routine steps for « legitimate defence » (Linhardt and Moreau de Bellaing, 2005).

  1. Shifting focus from political to social issues: the necessary heuristic reversal

What prevents us from raising current social issues in Cameroon in a serene manner? Why is reform in sectors as important as education and higher learning, housing or health so difficult to put out in the public space? How has the over-politicisation of public life in Cameroon affected the delivery of social policies in the post-adjustment era? Addressing issues on Cameroon from this perspective creates the premise for a heuristic reversal that is necessary for the renewal of knowledge on this nation. Over the past decades, intellectual discourse has, for the most part, been focused on political issues, especially with the heralding figure of President Biya or the system he embodies. By pursuing this major line of thought, analysts from all sides have played into the over-politicisation of social issues in Cameroon. Political issues (debates on identity and ethnic origin, governance, elections, rule of law and justice, etc.) have taken precedence over the issues of social life, and over economic and regional inequalities. Obviously, a tenuous link exists between the two areas, but the over-politicisation of economic issues should happen in parallel with the macro-economic transformations facing the country in the global economy, against the backdrop of supervision from international financial institutions.

Fundamental research has to be conducted on the weight of harmful political and State practices inconsistent with local and diaspora forces driving the dynamics for social transformation. Tensions are perceptible, for example, in the field of private and public sector coalitions. Private entrepreneurs have to deal with elites in the party-state who try to benefit from investments in all sectors of the economy, despite the harmful consequences for the country’s development. Such findings have been confirmed in almost all areas of social and economic life, and particularly in investments for reform in the water sector and urban management (Nantchop, 2015). These situations in part explain the collisions between the informal and formal markets, and contribute to the emergence of state networks in constant redeployment (Hibou, 1998).

The logic behind this vicious circle comes from a spectrum broader than corruption. The prevarication and monetarization of social relations, even within public departments, has skyrocketed to such levels that it is possible to renew the hypothesis of « the neo-patrimonial state » (Médard, 1992, 1981), to confirm that in Cameroon today, two times more than yesterday, the “politics of the belly” (Bayart, 1989) is at play, and to open a thorough debate on « one of the most opaque, most centralized and most prosaic systems of government in postcolonial Africa”.2 There is reason to think this situation derives, at the same time, from the « attitude of avoidance » and the regulation of elites, who see their allegiance to the regime as a way of protecting themselves from the dangers of Opération Épervier and/or a hypothetical change in political power. Taking a renewed outlook on issues such as education, access to housing and health, can enlighten us on the situation in Cameroon amid the paradoxes, continuities and conservative orthodoxy from a leader who controls the elites in the way Putin does in Russia, and masterminds his regime’s longevity like Machiavelli’s The Prince.

One indicator attests to Cameroon’s downward spiral into social uncertainty. Cameroon is one of the 14 countries worldwide where indicators on maternal mortality have recorded no significant progress since 1990. In other words, Cameroon has reached the symbolic threshold of 1000 maternal deaths for every 100,000 live births. This health indicator is the same in countries that have experienced long-term crises (Sierra Leone, DRC, Chad) and positions Cameroon below countries with less human and material resources (Mali, Benin, for example).

  1. Reforming under a “reign nearing its end”: the governance of neutralization

Cameroon, like most African countries, is conducting reforms in the post-adjustment era under the auspices of the international financial institutions (the IMF and the World Bank). This co-construction of public action is carried out with a stream of partners, including bilateral, private, non-governmental and civil society partners in what is now known as the « matrix of public action in Africa » (Eboko, 2015). Beyond the propaganda about « milestone achievements », these reforms show there is a paradoxical balance in Cameroon’s political landscape that we call the governance of neutralization. This is a zero-sum game that consists in neutralizing any effort for the emergence of a figure embodying the idea of « succession » in the president’s majority party. This governance assumes that political figures have access to public resources by staging and prioritizing their allegiance to the regime beyond the mandates, missions and responsibilities they have. Indeed, conducting reform exposes the officials to a two-pronged constraint, where only failure may not have any political consequence. Conducting a successful reform that entails management of a financial portfolio places the authorities responsible for it in the potential posture of successful figures, which is dangerous politically.

In this context, it would be useful to document how the authorities politically construct and manage public policies or reforms, successes and failures whose consequences enshrine an unprecedented form of political logic. In fact, none of the major disasters that mark the decay of certain sectors has given rise to exemplary sanctions from the top officials in government or the Department of justice. Instead, the opposite is recurrent. A Finance Minister was sacked after he held successful negotiations with the IMF in 1997 and “dared” to organise a press conference to report these negotiations to the general public. A Health Minister was sacked and jailed after he and international partners implemented an initiative in 2007 on free AIDS drugs. The conjunction of political choices for controlling the movement of elites and the common law offences « authorized” by the vacuity of what economists refer to as « quality of spending », is one of the hallmarks of the system. Examples of the sort abound. Rare are those in the other direction, where scandals of all kinds in the health, transport, education, and prisons systems, to name a few, end in silence within the polity after the announcement of « investigations » whose results are published either late or amidst general indifference3.

Two types of facts may shed light on this phenomenon. The authorities’ prudence reinforces the stationary dimension of a state that gets paralysed, in part, by constant announcements about its soon ending reign. Further, the reconfiguration of the political fray, both on the side of the so-called opposition parties and that of the ruling Cameroon People’s Democratic Movement (CPDM), is an important factor in the current situation. The imminence of presidential elections in 2018 has given rise, since 2015, to discreet, yet real confrontation between rival forces within the party-state. Since the end of 2015, an increasing number of regionalized « motions and counter-motions from the people », often driven by party elites in favour of « the natural candidate Paul Biya », are creating tensions among the party bigwigs. These real contests on who will be the most authorised voice to sign or get others to sign the « motion », or even the best statement in support of the presidential candidate, uncover a landscape with the recomposition of fractions that will undoubtedly be central to the transition. On the side of the opposition, Ni John Fru Ndi’s Social Democratic Front has split into several factions and this latter, hit by the « founding father » syndrome (Ela, 1990; Mbembé, 2001) has probably and definitely lost all credibility beyond his regional stronghold. Figures who are partly old and partly new have entered the presidential campaign race. Maurice Kamto, an academician and former minister of the current regime, is one of them. Likewise, but more recently, the former president of the Cameroon Bar Association and former vice-president of Amnesty International, Barrister Akere Muna, an anglophone and the son of the former vice-president of Cameroon (Solomon Tandeng Muna) followed suit. These younger dignitaries and candidates are trying to rebuild a broken opposition force. What ideas are emanating from this repositioning in the build-up to the announced end and constantly renewed reign of the « Biya era »?

The priority, but not exhaustive areas where contributions would be required concern the political manoeuvres within projects and reforms that concern port infrastructure (the construction and commissioning of the Kribi deep-water port to support the Douala autonomous port), prison policy and justice, the education system, the health system, etc.

With this in mind, there is need also to highlight France’s role as an adjustment variable among partners for the reforms Cameroon is conducting. While Cameroonian academicians, journalists and citizens were cultivating a hard-line narrative vis-à-vis France, Cameroon was offering French companies a particularly privileged position in the management of major reforms. This mechanism of tutelage seems however to be falling apart with the advent of new partnerships. What are the mechanisms and facts that explain this paradox, if it is real at all? The transformation of the debt burden Yaounde owes to Paris has given rise to the « Debt Reduction-Development Contract » (C2D) which finances several sectors. What are the leverage points by which French diplomacy is being reconfigured in Cameroon’s international relations which have been on an extensively diversifying trend?

Proposals for articles (1 page) should be sent to the dossier coordinators (fred.eboko@wanadoo.fr and pawondo2005@yiahoo.fr) by 30 November 2017.

Timeline:

  • 30 November 2017: send proposals to the coordinators

  • 15 December 2017: authors of selected proposals are notified

  • 1st March 2018: send selected articles to the journal’s editorial board (50 000 characters, spaces and footnotes included)

  • June 2018: publication.

Bibliography

Abéga Séverin Cécile, « La presse et l’État, l’exemple des procès sur l’homosexualité au Cameroun », Terroirs, n° 1-2, 2007.

Awondo Patrick, « médias, politique et homosexualité au Cameroun, retour sur la construction d’une controverse », Politique africaine, n°126, 2012, p. 69-85.

Bigo Didier, « La mondialisation de l’insécurité ? Réflexions sur le champ des professionnels de la gestion des inquiétudes et analytique de la transnationalisation des processus d’insécurisation », Culture & Conflits, n°58, p. 53-101.

Bayart Jean-François, L’État en Afrique. La politique du ventre, Paris, Fayard, 1989.

Bayart Jean-François, « La société politique camerounaise », Politique africaine, 22, 1986, p.5-36.

Bayart Jean-François, Geschiere Peter, Nyamnjoh Francis, « Autochtonie, démocratie et citoyenneté en Afrique », Critique internationale n° 10, 2001, p. 177-194.

Courade George, Sindjoun Luc « Le Cameroun dans l’entre-deux », Politique africaine, 62, 1996, p. 3-14.

Eboko Fred, « Les élites politiques au Cameroun. Le renouvellement sans renouveau ? », In Daloz J.-P., Le (non-) renouvellement des élites en Afrique subsaharienne, Bordeaux, CEAN, p. 99-133.

Eboko Fred, Repenser l’action publique en Afrique. Du sida à la globalisation des politiques publiques, Paris, Karthala, 2015.

Éboussi Boulaga Fabien, La démocratie de transit au Cameroun, Le Harmattan, Paris, 1997

Foucault Michel, 2013, La société́ punitive : cours au Collège de France, 1972-1973, Paris, France, EHESS/Gallimard/Seuil.

Fraser Nancy, Qu’est-ce que la justice sociale ? Paris, La Découverte, 2005

Geschiere Peter, Sorcellerie et politique en Afrique. La viande des autres, Paris, Karthala, 1995

Hibou Béatrice, « Retrait ou redéploiement de l’État », Critique Internationale n°1, – automne 1998, p. 151-168.

International Crisis Group, Cameroun : la menace du radicalisme religieux, Rapport Afrique, N° 229, 3 septembre 2015.

  • Cameroun : mieux vaut prévenir que guérir, Briefing Afrique, N° 1°1, septembre 2014.

  • Cameroun : les dangers d’un régime en pleine fracture, Rapport Afrique, N° 161, 24 juin 2010.

  • Cameroun : État fragile ?, Rapport Afrique, N° 160, 25 mai 2010.

Linhardt Dominique et Moreau De Bellaing Cédric, 2005, « Légitime violence ? Enquêtes sur la réalité de l’État démocratique », Revue française de science politique, 2005, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 269‐298.

Mehler Andreas, « Cameroun : une transition qui n’a pas eu lieu », in Jean-Pascal Daloz et Patrick Quantin, Eds, Transitions démocratiques africaines, Paris, Karthala, 1997, p. 95-138.

Mbembé Achille, « Pouvoir des morts et langage des vivants. Les errances de la mémoire nationaliste au Cameroun », Politique africaine, 22, 1986, p. 37-73.

Mbembé Achille, De la postcolonie. Essai sur l’imagination politique dans l’Afrique contemporaine, Paris, Karthala, 2000.

Médard Jean-François, « L’État néo-patrimonial », in J.-F. Médard (dir.), États d’Afrique, Karthala, 1991.

Médard Jean-François, « L’État sous-développé au Cameroun », Année africaine, 1977, Paris, Pedone, 1979, p. 35-84.

Médard Jean-François, « L’État clientéliste transcendé ? », A livre ouvert, discussion autour de l’ouvrage de Jean-François Bayart, L’État au Cameroun, Politique africaine, n° 1, mars 1981 : 120-124.

Nantchop Tenkap, « L’action publique urbaine à l’épreuve des réformes du service d’eau à Douala (Cameroun) », Géocarrefour, 90/1 | 2015, p. 61-71.

Pigeaud Fanny, Au Cameroun de Paul Biya, Paris, Karthala, « Les terrains du siècle », 2011.

Pomerolle Marie-Emmanuelle, « La démobilisation collective au Cameroun : entre régime postautoritaire et militantisme extraverti », Critique internationale, n° 40, 2008, p. 73-94.

Roessler Philip, Ethnic politics and state power in Africa. The logic of the coup-civil war trap, Cambridge University Press, 2011.

Sindjoun Luc, L’État ailleurs. Entre noyau dur et case vide, Paris, Economica, 2002.

1 For example, anglophone researchers have produced abundant literature on issues of identity and political representativeness, as well as on economic issues, which is hardly taken into account by local francophone researchers and vice versa. The bibliography on the anglophone crisis, published from anglophone researchers’ perspective as compiled by Francis Nyanmjoh, is instructive in this regard. See link: http://www.ascleiden.nl/news/reading-list-anglophone-crisis-and-internet-shutdown-cameroon

2 Achille Mbembé, « Au Cameroun, le crépuscule d’une dictature à huis clos », Le Monde Afrique, 9 October 2017: Further reading at http://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2017/10/09/au-cameroun-le-crepuscule-d-une-dictature-a-huis-clos_5198501_3212.html#HXw803hR2kVK6WT3.99

3 21 October 2016, a train accident causes over a hundred casualties at Eseka (between Yaounde and Douala) wounding hundreds; 12 March, 2017: a 31-year-old woman, pregnant with twins, is disembowelled by her sister in law who was trying to save the children in the dead mother’s womb. The event took place at the entrance to the maternity section of Laquintinie hospital in Douala; 5 May, 2007: Kenyan Airways flight 507 disappears from the radar of the airport authorities a few minutes after take-off from Douala international airport. The wreckage is found only 3 days later; 114 casualties. Kenyan authorities get to the scene of the tragedy before Cameroonian officials. Cameroon’s Transport Minister at the time argues, in shameless self-defence, that he was in his village to prepare for elections on behalf of the ruling party.

Présentation du dossier « Matérialités du vote » de la revue Politique africaine

En partenariat avec l’Axe 1 « État, Institutions et citoyenneté » de LAM et l’’Association des Chercheurs de Politique africaine (ACPA)

Présentation du dossier « Matérialités du vote » de la revue Politique africaine 

Mercredi 1er mars 2017 : 17h-19h à l’IEP de Bordeaux (salle à confirmer)

Avec la participation de

Sandrine Perrot (coordinatrice du dossier) : chargée de recherche à la Fondation nationale des sciences politiques (FNSP), membre du Centre de recherche international (CERI) de Sciences Po Paris et corédactrice en chef de la revue Politique africaine.

Marie-Aude Fouéré (autrice dans le dossier) : maitresse de conférence à l’EHESS, membre de l’Institut des mondes africains (IMAF) à Paris

« Matérialités du vote », Politique africaine, n° 144, décembre 2016 (coordonné par Sandrine Perrot, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle et Justin Willis)

En période électorale, l’espace public est envahi d’objets. Posters, T-shirts, messages audio-visuels, manuels de l’électeur circulent aussi bien dans les rues que dans des espaces sociaux plus spécifiques (Églises, administrations, marchés…). De leur côté, les institutions électorales conçoivent, achètent, diffusent des technologies censées permettre un processus électoral « intègre » depuis le recensement électoral jusqu’au dépouillement du scrutin. Un ensemble hétérogène d’objets sont ainsi produits afin de construire des institutions et des citoyens en adéquation avec les représentations politiques « modernes », en constante redéfinition. Cette profusion matérielle, officielle et officieuse, offre une perspective de recherche stimulante dans le champ de la sociologie électorale. Partir des objets, au cœur de transactions matérielles et symboliques lors du moment électoral, permet de tracer au plus près les tentatives de contrôle, les formes de l’échange, de la soumission et de la désobéissance qui caractérisent les situations électorales, à la fois routinières et toujours exceptionnelles.

Pour une présentation du dossier, cliquez sur le lien suivant http://filez.sciencespobordeaux.fr/ash6

Présentation en lien avec l’EXPOSITION Les élections en Afrique : quelle(s) affaire(s) ! Citoyenneté et technologies du vote à voir à la bibliothèque de Sciences Po Bordeaux jusqu’au 7 mars 2017 (sur les horaires d’ouverture de la bibliothèque).

AAC_Penser les radicalisations religieuses – CFP Rethinking religious radicalisation in Africa

 

« Penser les radicalisations religieuses en Afrique »

coordonné par Roland Marchal (CNRS, Ceri-Sciences-Po)

et Zekeria Ould Ahmed Salem (Université de Nouakchott)

(English version follows)

Il n’allait nullement de soi de proposer un dossier à Politique africaine sur les radicalisations religieuses dans un contexte où le monde académique, les médias et les politiques publiques s’en sont déjà largement saisis. Pourtant, c’est justement cette profusion actuelle de discours et de recherches qui constitue le point de départ de ce dossier. Son questionnement porte sur la manière dont la notion de radicalisation, en l’occurrence en Afrique, est abordée dans le champ des sciences sociales

L’expansion de ce qu’on appelle « terrorisme islamiste » a en effet polarisé le débat public sur « la radicalisation » (Neumann, 2013) et ses dimensions politiques, sociales et sécuritaires (Khorsokhavar, 2014 ; Kepel, 2015). Désormais, le sens de cette notion, familière aux spécialistes de la sociologie politique (Collovald et Gaiti, 2006), s’est modifié et a transformé les enjeux de ses usages dans l’après 11 septembre 2001 (Crettiez, 2006).

Or, dans la période récente, on s’est moins préoccupé de produire des connaissances nouvelles sur le sujet que de s’imposer dans le champ académique et médiatique pour obtenir une reconnaissance politique et scientifique[1]. Les ressources générées par les programmes de contre-radicalisation lancés par les gouvernements et les organisations internationales (les fameux CVE : Countering Violent Extremism) ont paradoxalement conduit à un usage non critique des notions de « radicalisation » et de « radicalisme », y compris par les sciences sociales. Ainsi, en France, l’initiative Athena d’étude de la radicalisation lancée sous le leadership du CNRS a été présentée comme une occasion de combiner à l’enseignement et à la recherche – vocation classique des organismes impliqués dans ce programme – une sorte de « community service » à l’américaine par lequel les sciences sociales françaises pourraient « se rendre enfin utiles » (Athena, 2016) en contribuant à la lutte contre « la radicalisation ». Le resserrement des liens entre recherche et pratique n’est pas sans poser problème en termes d’autonomie de la pensée scientifique, d’une part, mais aussi vis-à-vis de la manière dont celle-ci concourt, en retour, à construire des problèmes jugés prioritaires dans l’espace public.

Or, il revient précisément aux sciences sociales de s’interroger sur le sens et le degré d’adéquation de cette terminologie avec les phénomènes sociaux qu’elle vise à subsumer. Par exemple, faut-il traiter ensemble les phénomènes de violence et les dynamiques circonscrites au champ religieux ou cultuel ? Faut-il se référer aux catégories émiques ou produire une catégorie générique d’analyse même si les acteurs ne se reconnaissent pas nécessairement dans cette dernière ? Comment peut-on échapper à la « surinterprétation religieuse » des phénomènes politiques sans négliger le phénomène de justification religieuse des violences (Brigaglia, 2015) ?

Le présent dossier cherche à explorer la radicalisation et le radicalisme en Afrique sous la triple forme de la catégorie intellectuelle, de la politique publique et du processus socioreligieux, ainsi qu’à partir des articulations entre ces différents registres. Nous proposons d’aborder la « radicalisation » à travers la manière dont elle se déploie sur le plan social et religieux, structure le débat public, fonde des programmes politiques et exprime des changements sociaux, politiques et religieux, voire affecte la nature de l’État ou les relations internationales des pays africains. L’objectif est d’aborder cette thématique, dans le contexte de l’Afrique, à partir, et surtout au-delà, des études du terrorisme ou du seul cas du djihadisme. Nous faisons l’hypothèse que l’on ne peut pas étudier la radicalisation islamique sans ce jeu de miroir avec les autres formes de radicalisations non-islamiques, voire de co-radicalisations (Pratt, 2015) dans un contexte où, par exemple, des radicalismes violents anti-musulmans (tels les mouvements anti-Balaka en République centrafricaine) sont inspirés par des églises du Réveil. Il reste entendu que les fondamentalismes de toutes les religions apparaissent souvent comme des « ennemis complémentaires » (Bayart, 2016). Débouchent-ils pour autant nécessairement sur des violences armées ? Nous voudrions dans tous les cas interroger les écarts entre qualification et réalité empirique en explorant, par exemple, différents qualificatifs locaux : par exemple, pourquoi, au Nigeria, évoque-t-on Boko Haram comme une « secte » ? En général, on doit prendre la mesure de la difficulté à adosser la réflexion sur ce sujet à un travail de terrain dans les contextes marqués par « la menace terroriste » ou les « guerres civiles », en adaptant souvent nos stratégies de recherche (Barkindo, 2016).

L’Afrique a été largement absente de la réflexion récente et du débat public tenu ailleurs, par exemple, sur « le radicalisme islamique » alors qu’elle fournit un cadre analytique d’autant plus pertinent que la France et ses alliés interviennent militairement au nord comme au sud du Sahara au nom de la lutte contre la radicalisation djihadiste. De l’autre, les discours mi-politiques mi-scientifiques sur la radicalisation ont (comme d’ailleurs l’usage des termes indéfinis de « terrorisme » ou d’« extrémisme ») (Sanson et al., 2012) des effets locaux significatifs, au point, d’ailleurs, que certains s’interrogent sur une radicalisation concomitante des États ou de fractions de la société, hostiles à l’Islam ou aux communautés musulmanes[2]. De même, les interventions internationales au Sahel, la mobilisation des pays du bassin du Lac Tchad contre Boko Haram ou la longue guerre contre l’Organisation des jeunes combattants (Shabaab) en Somalie soulignent l’ancrage d’une radicalité proclamée « islamique » par les groupes ou des individus armés.

Or, si l’Afrique a plutôt été mise à distance dans la prise en compte politico-scientifique de la « radicalisation », en particulier « islamiste », c’est sans doute pour deux raisons bien discutables, au-delà du fait que ce terme est d’abord associé à l’analyse des « homegrown terrorists » en Occident. La première tient à la pérennité d’une certaine vision culturaliste de l’Afrique sub-saharienne liée par exemple à la vieille idée d’un « islam noir » pacifiste (Sanneh, 2016) qui serait rétif à toute radicalisation doctrinale et à toute transformation violente[3]. Nous savons trop combien une telle vision est teintée d’idéologie et dépourvue de bases historiques sérieuses. La seconde raison, corollaire de la précédente, est celle de la supposée extranéité en Afrique du salafisme djihadiste, entendu ici comme le cadre idéologique permettant de justifier la violence, de l’organiser ou d’en fournir les mots d’ordre et les cibles (Ostebo, 2015b). Pourtant, l’expansion à certaines parties du continent d’un islam littéraliste ne peut s’analyser en faisant fi d’une histoire locale dont les révolutions religieuses font partie (Robinson, 2000 ; 2010 ; Searing, 2001), et d’une insertion spécifique de l’Afrique dans des dynamiques de la globalisation des idéologies politiques et religieuses (Ould Ahmed Salem, 2011 ; 2013). Cela avait d’ailleurs été démontré par les travaux antérieurs consacrés non seulement au sempiternel débat entre réforme et tradition (Kaba, 1974 ; Kobo, 2009) mais aussi à « l’islamisme en Afrique » (Kane et Triaud, 1993) et même à la « radicalisation islamique en Afrique » (Otayek et al., 1993).

Pour autant, si le radicalisme islamique est dominant dans la période récente, il serait erroné d’y voir le seul champ concerné ni même de limiter au champ religieux les effets politiques de la radicalisation. Quelles autres formes de radicalisations seraient en cours au sein ou autour d’autres religions pratiquées en Afrique et leur degré de politisation éventuelle ? Quel est le rapport entre les différentes formes de radicalisation religieuse sur le continent ? L’actualité tend à faire oublier combien des régimes politiques en Afrique, pour mieux saisir les opportunités internationales liées à la guerre mondiale contre le terrorisme, ont considérablement durci leur attitude vis-à-vis de communautés musulmanes. On se rend compte également que des clivages sociaux se sont reconfigurés en affrontements entre communautés religieuses sous l’effet de ces discours ou d’autres acteurs religieux dont on a sous-estimé le rôle comme les Églises du Réveil, évangéliques ou pentecôtistes.

Le dossier cherche de façon particulière à s’appuyer sur des cas d’études africains afin de répondre à des questions plus générales : quelle est la part du religieux, du politique et du social dans les processus dits de radicalisation religieuse et de leur dérive violente ? Comment la radicalisation religieuse réelle ou perçue affecte-t-elle la vie politique, les rapports sociaux, et les modes de gouvernance, dans le contexte de la « guerre mondiale contre le terrorisme » et des projets de dé-radicalisation ? Quels sont les rapports entre les mouvements de renouveau religieux et d’autres dynamiques relatives aux débats intergénérationnels, au rôle des élites, à la réforme néo-libérale des économies du continent, aux luttes sociales et aux relations transnationales avec l’Occident et le monde musulman ? En quoi les recherches sur le terrorisme ou la radicalisation ainsi que l’offre de consultance sur ce sujet modifient ou affectent la recherche sur d’autres objets comme la formation de l’État, l’économie politique, les inégalités ou le changement social ?

Si l’objectif n’est pas de cartographier la radicalisation religieuse sur le continent, ni de produire des analyses géopolitiques de l’avancée de l’extrémisme au Sud du Sahara, il est nécessaire que les auteurs potentiels puissent se prévaloir d’un usage du terme de radicalisation adossé à une connaissance assumée et explicite des enjeux attachés à cette notion. Autrement dit, la discussion par les contributeurs de la terminologie dans le cadre de leurs terrains respectifs est indispensable pour éviter de reprendre simplement une catégorie du discours politique. Cela permettra de préciser en quoi des réalités très différentes peuvent se retrouver derrière cette notion de radicalisation et donc de se confronter à la difficulté de la constituer en objet.

En s’efforçant de tenir compte de la perspective générale ainsi dessinée, les contributions pourraient s’articuler autour des trois axes suivants :

  1. Radicalisations et contre-radicalisations religieuses

Il convient ici d’expliquer comment la montée du rigorisme religieux s’oppose concrètement, dans certains contextes, à une tradition plus modérée et comment des acteurs locaux et nationaux aux motivations diverses cherchent à proposer une contre-radicalisation selon des modalités et des formes n’entrant pas toujours dans les cadres étatiques nationaux ou internationaux de la « dé-radicalisation institutionnelle ». L’approche a déjà été adoptée pour le cas du Nigeria (Anonyme, 2012). Il a aussi été démontré qu’à un niveau micro-local, la confrontation entre salafistes et traditionnalistes musulmans ne porte le plus souvent ni sur la politique ni sur la violence mais sur la valeur sociale du savoir religieux par exemple (Becker, 2006). Le salafisme dans nombre de pays n’a guère pris des formes violentes, même quand il a transformé le paysage religieux au point que l’on a pu parler d’un « salafisme africain » (Ostebo, 2015), y compris à un niveau parfois très localisé (Becker, 2006 ; Ostebo, 2012). Dans le même temps, la « guerre spirituelle » est devenue un slogan et une pratique chez nombre de pentecôtistes globalisés (Marshall, 2016).

En explorant cette thématique de la radicalisation sur le continent africain, le dossier entend indiquer combien c’est la sphère religieuse toute entière et ses rapports à l’Etat qui se sont transformés de façon continue suivant des lignes de force qui obéissent autant à des facteurs sociaux internes qu’à un certain état de la globalisation et des influences transnationales sur la vie politique et religieuse. Ce faisant, il s’agit de mettre en lumière certaines apories et de souligner les limites d’une approche « individualisante » et psychologisante de la radicalisation violente par exemple. On pourrait ainsi confirmer ce que l’observation des situations conflictuelles en Afrique sub-saharienne conduit déjà à soutenir, à savoir que le lien entre radicalisation religieuse et passage à la violence est souvent plus faible qu’on veut bien l’admettre.

  1. D’un radicalisme à l’autre: par-delà le « terrorisme islamique »

En quoi des radicalisations religieuses non islamiques ont-elles pu évoluer, émerger ou se transformer dans une conjoncture où le « radicalisme islamique » tient le haut du pavé ? En quoi le poids du retour du religieux voire du djihadisme ont-ils affecté d’autres processus de radicalité ou même de violence ? Aborder la question sous cet angle permettrait de prendre du champ par rapport aux analyses conjoncturelles, tout en introduisant une nécessaire perspective comparative afin de revisiter de façon critique les analyses, les politiques et les usages de la radicalisation dans le champ social et politique, voire académique. Il s’agit d’interroger cette catégorie de « radicalisation » de façon plus large y compris en cherchant à déterminer quelles sont les relations de continuité et de rupture entre les radicalismes islamiques et les autres, y compris sur la longue durée et dans divers contextes africains. Cela revient à prendre en compte les changements récents et de mesurer leurs effets sur les rapports entre réformistes et conservateurs, tradition et renouveau, dans un contexte d’essoufflement des espoirs de démocratisation, de changements de l’économie politique des sociétés sub-sahariennes, de débats sur le rôle de la religion dans l’espace public, de réformes de l’éducation ou du droit de la famille par exemple.

  1. Radicalisations et rapports au monde ?

Le facteur « radical » modifie le rapport de l’Afrique au monde dans des proportions peu étudiées. Les contributeurs chercheront moins à analyser la géopolitique descriptive du radicalisme qu’à aborder de façon frontale et explicite les implications de l’usage des notions du radicalisme et de la radicalisation sur le devenir de l’État, ses rapports à la société et son insertion internationale. Il conviendrait d’explorer notamment comment des éléments exogènes, proprement politiques ou sociaux, deviennent centraux dans le déclenchement de la violence et sa perpétuation sur le continent ou comment des ressortissants du sous-continent se retrouvent dans des réseaux dits « radicaux ». On pourrait aussi s’attacher à l’étude de la globalisation de certains répertoires de violence même s’il faut manier avec une grande prudence la thématique des réseaux sociaux et des révolutions 2.0.

Il conviendrait de se demander selon quelles modalités les petites guerres menées avec l’aide de pays occidentaux contre des groupes radicaux situés aux marges de sociétés africaines se transforment en longues guerres. Ces engagements militaires peuvent générer de nouvelles lignes de partage entre espace privé et espace public, entre droits citoyens et conformisme identitaire avec, à la clef, une nouvelle mise à distance de l’État hérité de la colonisation. En tout cas, à travers la multiplicité des analyses particulières, on pourrait retrouver l’immanence des expériences de l’arbitraire et de la violence comme prolégomènes à ladite radicalisation comme l’affirment de plus en plus les chercheurs sur l’Europe occidentale (Khosrokhavar, 2016 ; Moos, 2016) et souligner combien, en Afrique comme ailleurs, la radicalisation et la lutte anti-terroriste font système. Il convient dès lors d’explorer dans cet axe la manière dont les dispositifs internationaux nommément mis en place pour lutter contre la radicalisation ont pu indirectement concourir à renforcer des réalités que l’on range sous ce terme.

 

Calendrier

  • 15 avril 2017 : date limite d’envoi des propositions d’article (max. 7000 signes espaces compris) à Roland Marchal (marchal@sciencespo.fr) et Zekeria Ould Ahmed Salem (zekeriasalem@gmail.com)
  • 30 avril 2017 : notification aux auteurs des propositions retenues par les coordinateurs du dossier
  • 15 septembre 2017 : date limite d’envoi des articles sélectionnés ( 55 000 signes notes et espaces compris) aux coordinateurs du dossier
  • Mars 2018 : parution des articles acceptés par le comité de rédaction de Politique africaine

Bibliographie :

Anonyme, “The Popular Discourses of Salafi Radicalism and Salafi Counter-radicalism in Nigeria: A Case Study of Boko Haram”, Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 42, n° 2, 2012, p. 118-144.

Athena-Alliance Nationale des Sciences humaines et Sociales, Recherches sur les radicalisations, les formes de violence qui en résultent, et la manière dont les sociétés les préviennent et s’en protègent. Etat des lieux, propositions, actions, Paris, mars 2016, <http://cache.media.education.gouv.fr/file/03__mars/22/9/Rapport_Radicalisation_545229.pdf?ts=1457090184>

Barkindo, Atta, “How Boko Haram exploits History and Memory”, Londres, Africa Research Institute, Counterpoints Series, octobre 2016.

Bayart, Jean-François, Les fondamentalistes de l’identité. Laïcisme versus djihadisme,  Paris, Karthala, 2016.

Becker, Felicitas, “Rural Islamism during the ‘War on Terror’: A Tanzanian Case Study,” African Affairs, n°105, 2006, p. 583–603.

Brigaglia, Andrea, « The volatility of Salafi Political Theology, the War on Terror and The Genesis of Boko Haram », Diritto e questioni pubbliche (Palermo), 2015, p. 174-201.

Collovald, Annie, Gaiti, Brigitte (dir.), La démocratie aux extrêmes. Sur la radicalisation politique, Paris, La Dispute, 2006.

Crettiez, Xavier, « Penser la radicalisation. Une sociologie processuelle des variables de l’engagement violent », Revue Française de Science Politique, vol. 66, n° 5, 2016, p. 709-727.

Kaba, Lansiné, The Wahhabiya. Islamic Reform and Politics in French West Africa, Evanston, Northwestern University Press, 1974.

Kane, Ousmane et Triaud, Jean-Louis, Islamismes au Sud du Sahara, Paris, Karthala, 1993.

Kepel, Gilles, Terreur dans l’Hexagone, Paris, Gallimard, 2015.

Khosrokhavar, Farhad, La Radicalisation, Paris, Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, 2014.

Kobo, Ousman , “The Development of Wahhabi Reforms in Ghana and Burkina Faso, 1960–1990: Elective Affinities between  Western-Educated Muslims and Islamic Scholars,” Comparative Studies in Society and  History, vol. 51, n° 3, 2009, p. 502-532.

Marshall, Ruth, “Destroying arguments and captivating thoughts: spiritual warfare prayer as global praxis”, Journal of Religion and Political Practice, vol. 2, n° 1, 2016, p. 92-113.

Moos, Olivier, « Le jihad s’habille en Prada. Une analyse des conversions djihadistes en Europe », Religioscope, Cahiers de l’Institut, n° 14, Paris, août 2016.

Neumann, Peter, « The trouble with radicalization », International Affairs, vol. 89, n° 4, 2013, p. 873–893

Ostebo, Terje, Localising Salafism. Religious Change among Oromo Muslims in Bale, Ethiopia, Leiden, Brill, 2012.

Ostebo, Terje (dir.), Dossier « Salafism in Africa », Islamic Africa, vol. 6, n° 1-2, 2015 (a).

Ostebo, T., « African Salafism. Religious Purity and the Politicization of Purity », Islamic Africa, Vol.6, n°1-2,  p. 1-29, 2015 (b).

Otayek, René (dir.), Le radicalisme islamique au sud du Sahara. Da’wa, arabisation et critique de l’Occident, Paris, Karthala, MSH Aquitaine, 1993.

Ould Ahmed Salem, Zekeria, “The paradoxes of Islamic Radicalization in Mauritania”, in George Joffe (dir.), Islamic Activism in The Maghreb. Politics and Process, London, Routledge, 2011, p. 179-2005.

Ould Ahmed Salem Zekeria, Prêcher dans le désert. Islam politique et changement social en Mauritanie, Paris, Karthala, 2013.

Pratt, Douglas, « Islamophobia as Reactive Co-Radicalization », Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations, vol. 26, n° 2, 2015, p. 205-218.

Robinson, David., Paths of Accomodation. Muslim societies and French colonial authorities, Athens, Ohio University Press, 2000.

Robinson, D., Les sociétés musulmanes africaines. Configurations et trajectoires historiques, Paris, Karthala, trad. franç., 2010.

Sanneh, Lamin, Beyond Jihad. The pacifist tradition in West African Islam, New York, Oxford University Press, 2016.

Sanson, Fabienne (dir.),  Dossier « L’Islam au-delà des catégories », Cahier d’études africaines, n° 206-207, 2012.

Searing, James, “God Alone is King”: Islam and Emancipation in Senegal, 1859-1914, Portsmouth, Heinemann, 2001.

[1] Voir « Olivier Roy et Gilles Kepel, querelle française sur le jihadisme », Libération, 14 avril 2016. Loin d’avoir été cantonnée à la presse parisienne, cette polémique a été répercutée ailleurs. Voir notamment “ ‘That Ignoramus’: 2 French Scholars of Radical Islam Turn Bitter Rivals”, The New York Times, 16 juillet 2016.

[2] On pense ici à l’Ethiopie ou à la RCA en Afrique, mais aussi aux discours occidentaux qui promeuvent aujourd’hui une conception radicale de la laïcité, bien différente de celle qui a prévalu pendant longtemps.

[3] Citons le cas, entre autres, de la conférence intitulée “Islam and World Peace: Perspectives from African Muslim Non-violence Traditions” tenue du 11 au 13 septembre 2015 l’Institut d’études africaines de Columbia University (New York) en collaboration avec la confrérie mouride de Touba (Sénégal).

 

 

*****

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Rethinking religious radicalisation in Africa”

coordinated by Roland Marchal (CNRS, Ceri-Sciences-Po)

and Zekeria Ould Ahmed Salem (University of Nouakchott)

 

Devoting a special issue of Politique africaine to religious radicalization was far from being self-evident. After all, academics, medias and policy makers alike have already greatly appropriated the subject. Our aim is precisely to draw on this profusion of discourse on radicalization in order to explore the ways in which social sciences approach this topic, especially with regards to case studies from the African continent.

The expansion of so-called “Islamic terrorism” has polarised public debate around the issue of “radicalisation” (Neumann, 2013) and its political, social and security consequences (Khorsokhavar, 2014; Kepel, 2015). The meaning of this concept, familiar to political sociologists (Collovald and Gaiti, 2006), has morphed and transformed the stakes surrounding its use in the aftermath of 9/11 (Crettiez, 2006).

However, as of late, scholarship on radicalisation has not been primarily driven by a sincere will to contribute to knowledge production, but rather by a desire to achieve fame or political recognition[1]. . The resources generated by counter-radicalisation programmes put in place by both governments and international organisations (the notorious CVE: Countering Violent Extremism) have paradoxically led to a rather non-critical use of the concepts of “radicalisation” and “radicalism”, including among social scientists. . For example, in France, the Athena initiative (a CNRS-lead programme dedicated to the study of radicalisation) was introduced to the public as an opportunity to start combining teaching and research – the traditional goals of the programme’s partner organisations – with the US-model of “community service”. The patrons of the projects suggested that this will help French social sciences to “finally” become useful” (Athena, 2016) by contributing to “counter-radicalisation” efforts. However, these narrower ties between fundamental research and its translation into practice raise a number of questions about academic freedom of thought and how it in turn contributes to the prioritisation of certain issues over other ones in the public debate.

Yet, it is precisely the task of social scientists to investigate the meanings attached to this whole new terminology. Scholars might want to explore in particular whether such vocabulary is a genuine reflection of the social phenomena it is meant to analyse.. This would lead to a set of new research questions. For example, should  issues as different as violence, cultural and religious dynamics be lumped and studied together?? Is it preferable to refer to semantic categories or to produce a more generic category of analysis, even if social actors themselves might well find it inaccurate? How do we escape “religious over-interpretation” of some political phenomena without downplaying the issue of the religious justification of violence (Brigaglia, 2015)?

This special issue aims at exploring radicalisation and radicalism in Africa through the triple scope of intellectual category, public policy and socio-religious processes, and their respective entanglements. We suggest addressing “radicalisation” by studying the way it unfolds in a given social and religious context; how it structures public debates provides a basis for political programmes; expresses social, political and religious change; and even affects the nature of the State or international relations of African nations. The objective here is to tackle this theme, in an African context, on the basis of, but also far beyond, studies of terrorism or jihadology. We posit that it is impossible to study Islamic radicalisation without contrasting it with other forms of non-Islamic radicalisation, or co-radicalisation (Pratt, 2015) – in cases of violent anti-Muslim fundamentalism (e.g. the anti-Balaka movements in Central African Republic) which are inspired by Revivalist Churches, for example. It is certain that fundamentalisms of any religious persuasion often appear to be “complementary enemies” (Bayart, 2016). However, do they necessarily lead to armed violence? Whatever the case, we encourage contributors to question the disparities between labelling and empirical reality through a careful exploration of how designations differ locally according to context:  for example, why is Boko Haram often identified as a “sect” in Nigeria? We must also acknowledge how difficult it can be to ground our reflection in fieldwork when conducting empirical research is nearly impossible in contexts fraught with “terrorist threats” or “civil wars”. Therefore, how do we adapt our research strategies accordingly in order to generate data and analysis (Barkindo, 2016)?

Africa has largely been excluded from recent public debate on “Islamic fundamentalism”, when such debates take place outside Africa.  Yet, as far as radicalism is concerned, Africa could actually provide a rather relevant comparative perspective on such issues. This is especially true since France and its allies have been military involved both north and south of the Sahara in the name of the fight against jihadist radicalisation. Furthermore, semi-political, semi-scientific discourse on radicalisation (e.g. the use of ill-defined terms such as “terrorism” or “extremism”) (Sanson et al., 2012) has significant localised repercussions, to the point of causing serious interrogation about the concurrent radicalisation of States or of certain social factions hostile to Islam or Muslim communities[2]. Similarly, a number of armed groups and individuals in Africa have engaged in radicalism and terrorism, prompting international military interventions notably in the Sahel region, while local armies in the Lake Chad basin countries are fighting against Boko Haram or the al-Shabab in Somalia.

Since “radicalisation” is a word associated first and foremost with the study of “homegrown terrorists” in the West, Africa has been pushed to the fringes of the political and scientific analysis of radicalisation, in particular « Islamic » radicalisation. But there are also other more debatable reasons why “radicalisation in Africa” has not been a popular topic. First, there is a a persistent culturalist vision of sub-Saharan Africa as a home of a particular “Black Islam” or “West African Islamic Tradition” (Sanneh, 2016). The continent is therefore deemed resistant to any doctrinal radicalisation and violent transformation[3]. We know all too well the ideological undertones associated with this point of view and how little it is grounded in historical facts. Secondly, Africa is also supposed to be somehow immune to Salafist jihadism that is often  understood as the ideological framework justifying violence, organising it or setting its watchwords and targets (Ostebo, 2015).

However, it is impossible to analyse the expansion of literalist Islam to certain parts of the continent while ignoring local history – of which religious revolutions are an intrinsic part (Robinson, 2000; 2010; Searing, 2001) – and Africa’s specific position in the globalisation of political and religious ideologies (Ould Ahmed Salem, 2011; 2013). This has already been established by prior works addressing the unending competition n between reform and tradition (Kaba, 1974; Kobo, 2009) as well as “Islamism in Africa” (Kane and Triaud, 1993) and even “Islamic radicalisation in Africa” (Otayek et al., 1993).

If radical Islamism has dominated in recent times, it would be short-sighted to exclude other forms of radicalism from our analysis or to limit our study of the political effects of radicalisation to the sole religious world. We should ask what other forms of radicalisation are growing within or on the margins of other religions practiced in Africa and what is their degree of potential politicisation? What is the connection between different forms of religious radicalisation on the continent? Recent media trends tend to lead us to forget how political regimes in Africa have hardened their attitudes vis-à-vis Muslim communities in order to better take advantage of the international opportunities offered by the so called “world war on terror”. This rhetoric, as well as the underestimation of other religious players such as Revivalist, Evangelical or Pentecostal churches, has reconfigured certain social divides into full-on confrontation between religious communities.

This special issue aims to use specific African case studies in order to answer more general questions such as: what part does religious, political and social contexts have to play in the process of religious radicalisation and its shift towards violence? How does religious radicalisation, be it real or perceived, affect political life, social relationships, and modes of governance in the context of the “world war on terrorism” and de-radicalisation projects? What links exist between religious renewal and other dynamics relative to intergenerational debates, the role of the elites, neo-liberal reform of the continent’s economies, social movements and transnational relations with both the West and the Muslim world? How does research on terrorism or radicalisation, as well as the ever growing consultancy market on the subject affect research on this and other subjects such as State-building, political economy, social inequality or social change?

The objective here is not primarily to map out religious radicalisation on the continent or produce geopolitical analyses on the advance of extremism  South of the Sahara. Therefore, it is necessary that potential contributors be aware of the fact that the concept of “radicalization” is so charged that it compels anyone using it to state as clearly as possible their own definition of it and how they intend to use it in exploring their own data and argument. This means that it indispensable for contributors to discuss terminology in the context of their respective fields in order to avoid simply echoing political and media discourse.

Taking into account this general perspective, contributions could be articulated around the three following sub-themes:

  1. Religious radicalisation and counter-radicalisations

It would be relevant here to explain how the rise of religious rigorism is, in certain contexts, concretely opposed to a more moderate tradition, as well as how local and national players with diverse incentives offer counter-radicalisation solutions that don’t always fit in with national or international frameworks of “institutional de-radicalisation”. This approach has already been applied to Nigeria (Anonymous, 2012). It has also been determined that on a micro-local level, confrontations between Salafist and traditionalist Muslims often no longer centre on politics or violence but rather on the social value of religious knowledge for example (Becker, 2006). In many countries, Salafism has not translated into violence even if it has transformed the religious landscape generating a so called “African Salafism” (Ostebo, 2015) sometimes on a localised level (Becker, 2006; Ostebo, 2012). At the same time, the concept of “spiritual war” has become a slogan and a practice for many globalised Pentecostals (Marshall, 2016).

By exploring the theme of radicalisation on the African continent, this special issue seeks to emphasise how much religion as a whole, including its relationship to the State, has been continually transformed following trends influenced by both internal social factors and globalisation’s transnational influences on political and religious life. In doing so, it should highlight certain contradictions and demonstrate the limits of an “individualising” and psychologising approach to violent radicalisation. We could thereby confirm what the observation of conflicts in sub-Saharan Africa already leads us to posit, namely that the link between religious radicalisation and violence is often weaker than we care to admit.

  1. Radicalism in comparative perspective: beyond “Islamic terrorism”.

 

How have non-Islamic forms of religious radicalisation evolved, emerged or been transformed in a context where “Islamic radicalism” holds centre-stage? How does the resurgence of religiosity and even jihadism affect other processes of radicalism or violence? Posing the question under this angle would enable us to gain some perspective with regard to short-term analyses. It would also introduce the comparative overview necessary to critically revisit the analyses, politics and applications of the concept of radicalisation in social and political and even academic fields. We seek to widen the scope of the investigation into “radicalisation” by trying to ascertain how dynamics of continuity and rupture between Islamic and other forms of radicalism play out in the long term and in different African contexts. This involves taking into account recent changes and then measuring their effects on the relationship between reformists and conservatives, tradition and renewal, in a context of weakened hopes for democratisation, profound changes in the political economy of sub-Saharan societies, as well as in a context of heated debates over the role of religion in the public sphere, and the reform of education and of family law to name but a few.

  1. Radicalisation and relationship to the world?

 

The “radical” factor changes the relationship that Africa has to the world in proportions that are little-studied. Contributors should not try to analyse the descriptive geopolitics of radicalism so much as they should directly and explicitly address the repercussions of the use of the concept of radicalism and radicalisation on the evolution of the African State, its relationship to society and its international integration. It would be relevant to explore how certain exogenous elements, be they political or social, become central to the outbreak of violence and its enactment throughout the continent. Or how nationals of the sub-continent find themselves caught up in so-called “radical” networks. One could also attempt a study of the globalisation of certain categories of violence, bearing in mind that the theme of social media and 2.0 revolutions should be handled with utmost caution.

It would be useful to reflect on how small wars lead with the support of Western countries against radical groups on the margins of African societies morph into drawn-out conflicts. These military engagements can create new divides between private and public spaces, between citizen’s rights and the need to conform to social identities, resulting in further detachment from a colonially inherited State. In any case, through multiple, case-specific analyses, it may be possible to assert, as specialists of Western Europe increasingly are (Khosrokhavar, 2016; Moos, 2016), that experiences of arbitrariness and violence are preliminary to radicalisation. We could also underline how, in Africa and elsewhere, radicalisation and the war on terrorism are systematically interwoven. This axis should explore how international measures set up to counter radicalisation may have indirectly contributed to reinforcing realities that could be classified as such.

 

 

 

Calendar

  • 15 April 2017: deadline for the submission of abstracts (max. 7000 characters spaces included) to Roland Marchal (marchal@sciencespo.fr) and Zekeria Ould Ahmed Salem (zekeriasalem@gmail.com)
  • 30 April 2017: announcement of the submissions selected by the project coordinators
  • 15 September 2017: deadline for the submission of selected papers ( 55 000 characters spaces and footnotes included) to the project coordinators
  • March 2018: expected publication of the articles accepted by Politique africaine’s editorial board

 

Bibliography:

Anonymous, “The Popular Discourses of Salafi Radicalism and Salafi Counter-radicalism in Nigeria: A Case Study of Boko Haram”, Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 42, n° 2, 2012, p. 118-144.

Athena-Alliance Nationale des Sciences humaines et Sociales, Recherches sur les radicalisations, les formes de violence qui en résultent, et la manière dont les sociétés les préviennent et s’en protègent. Etat des lieux, propositions, actions, Paris, mars 2016, <http://cache.media.education.gouv.fr/file/03__mars/22/9/Rapport_Radicalisation_545229.pdf?ts=1457090184>

Barkindo, Atta, “How Boko Haram exploits History and Memory”, Londres, Africa Research Institute, Counterpoints Series, octobre 2016.

Bayart, Jean-François, Les fondamentalistes de l’identité. Laïcisme versus djihadisme,  Paris, Karthala, 2016.

Becker, Felicitas, “Rural Islamism during the ‘War on Terror’: A Tanzanian Case Study,” African Affairs, n°105, 2006, p. 583–603.

Brigaglia, Andrea, « The volatility of Salafi Political Theology, the War on Terror and The Genesis of Boko Haram », Diritto e questioni pubbliche (Palermo), 2015, p. 174-201.

Collovald, Annie, Gaiti, Brigitte (dir.), La démocratie aux extrêmes. Sur la radicalisation politique, Paris, La Dispute, 2006.

Crettiez, Xavier, « Penser la radicalisation. Une sociologie processuelle des variables de l’engagement violent », Revue Française de Science Politique, vol. 66, n° 5, 2016, p. 709-727.

Kaba, Lansiné, The Wahhabiya. Islamic Reform and Politics in French West Africa, Evanston, Northwestern University Press, 1974.

Kane, Ousmane et Triaud, Jean-Louis, Islamismes au Sud du Sahara, Paris, Karthala, 1993.

Kepel, Gilles, Terreur dans l’Hexagone, Paris, Gallimard, 2015.

Khosrokhavar, Farhad, La Radicalisation, Paris, Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, 2014.

Kobo, Ousman , “The Development of Wahhabi Reforms in Ghana and Burkina Faso, 1960–1990: Elective Affinities between  Western-Educated Muslims and Islamic Scholars,” Comparative Studies in Society and  History, vol. 51, n° 3, 2009, p. 502-532.

Marshall, Ruth, “Destroying arguments and captivating thoughts: spiritual warfare prayer as global praxis”, Journal of Religion and Political Practice, vol. 2, n° 1, 2016, p. 92-113.

Moos, Olivier, « Le jihad s’habille en Prada. Une analyse des conversions djihadistes en Europe », Religioscope, Cahiers de l’Institut, n° 14, Paris, août 2016.

Neumann, Peter, « The trouble with radicalization », International Affairs, vol. 89, n° 4, 2013, p. 873–893

Ostebo, Terje, Localising Salafism. Religious Change among Oromo Muslims in Bale, Ethiopia, Leiden, Brill, 2012.

Ostebo, Terje (dir.), Dossier « Salafism in Africa », Islamic Africa, vol. 6, n° 1-2, 2015 (a).

Ostebo, T., « African Salafism. Religious Purity and the Politicization of Purity », Islamic Africa, Vol.6, n°1-2,  p. 1-29, 2015 (b).

Otayek, René (dir.), Le radicalisme islamique au sud du Sahara. Da’wa, arabisation et critique de l’Occident, Paris, Karthala, MSH Aquitaine, 1993.

Ould Ahmed Salem, Zekeria, “The paradoxes of Islamic Radicalization in Mauritania”, in George Joffe (dir.), Islamic Activism in The Maghreb. Politics and Process, London, Routledge, 2011, p. 179-2005.

Ould Ahmed Salem Zekeria, Prêcher dans le désert. Islam politique et changement social en Mauritanie, Paris, Karthala, 2013.

Pratt, Douglas, « Islamophobia as Reactive Co-Radicalization », Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations, vol. 26, n° 2, 2015, p. 205-218.

Robinson, David., Paths of Accomodation. Muslim societies and French colonial authorities, Athens, Ohio University Press, 2000.

Robinson, D., Les sociétés musulmanes africaines. Configurations et trajectoires historiques, Paris, Karthala, trad. franç., 2010.

Sanneh, Lamin, Beyond Jihad. The pacifist tradition in West African Islam, New York, Oxford University Press, 2016.

Sanson, Fabienne (dir.),  Dossier « L’Islam au-delà des catégories », Cahier d’études africaines, n° 206-207, 2012.

Searing, James, “God Alone is King”: Islam and Emancipation in Senegal, 1859-1914, Portsmouth, Heinemann, 2001.

[1] See « Olivier Roy et Gilles Kepel, querelle française sur le jihadisme », Libération, 14 April 2016. The repercussions of this controversy were felt far beyond the Parisian press. See, for example, “‘That Ignoramus’: 2 French Scholars of Radical Islam Turn Bitter Rivals”, The New York Times, 16 July 2016.

[2] This is the case in Ethiopia or RCA in Africa, but it also brings to mind Western rhetoric that currently promotes a radical conception of secularism, very different from that which used to dominate political discourse.

[3] An example among many is that of the conference titled “Islam and World Peace: Perspectives from African Muslim Non-violence Traditions”, held from the 11th to the 13th September 2015 at the Institute for African Studies of Columbia University (New York) in collaboration with the Mouride Brotherhood of Touba (Senegal).

Invitation au débat « Penser l’Afrique avec Fanon? »

0001

Jeudi 2 février 2017, de 14h30 à 17h

à l’Institut historique allemand, 8, rue du Parc-Royal, 75003 – Paris

Invitation au débat « Penser l’Afrique avec Fanon? » sous la présidence de Jean-François Bayart (IHEID, Genève),

avec Roberto Beneduce (Université de Turin), Andreas Eckert (Université Humboldt, Berlin) et Simona Taliani (Université de Turin)

En prélude de la Conférence, à 18h : « Scènes d’une vie conjugale : histoire africaine et histoire globale », par Andreas Eckert (Université Humboldt, Berlin).

Discutante : Marielle Debos (Université de Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense)

Appel à contribution : Sortie de crise en Côte d’Ivoire

Sortie de crise en Côte d’Ivoire:

Défis et modalités sociopolitiques d’une réécriture de soi

 Dossier coordonné par Francis Akindès et Séverin Kouame

Le décès de Félix Houphouët-Boigny a ouvert, en Côte d’Ivoire, l’arène d’une lutte pour le pouvoir qui a duré un peu plus d’une décennie. Dans cette arène se sont constamment affrontés son seul et unique Premier Ministre (M. Alassane Ouattara), son dernier Président de l’Assemblée nationale et alors dauphin constitutionnel (M. Henri Konan Bédié), son dernier Chef d’État-major des armées (Feu le général Guéï Robert) et son opposant historique (M. Laurent Gbagbo). En plus d’introduire dans la praxis politique un usage important de la violence, ces affrontements, de par leur excessive brutalité, ont fortement écorné l’image d’un pays présenté jusqu’alors comme modèle de stabilité sociopolitique dans la sous-région. Pis, ils vont même inscrire dans la trame historique du pays ses pages les plus sombres avec son lot de phénomènes politiques traumatisants comme la production de charniers, les coups d’état à répétition et une rébellion armée. Ces modalités « nouvelles » de structuration de la compétition politique en Côte d’Ivoire n’ont certainement pas inauguré la mobilisation de la violence dans le champ politique local. Mais elles signent une escalade dans la « brutalisation » de ce champ. Restant dans la continuité de cette violence politique, la crise postélectorale de 2010 et ses 3 000 morts ont légué un trauma collectif et un héritage lourd de défis conjoncturels pour l’État.

Continuer la lecture de Appel à contribution : Sortie de crise en Côte d’Ivoire

Appel à contributions : Techniques des corps politiques

Dossier coordonné par Thomas Riot et Nicolas Bancel

Institut des sciences du sport de l’Université de Lausanne (ISSUL-SSP), Institut des mondes africains (IMAF-CNRS)

« L’Afrique a échoué. Vous les sportifs avez été les seuls à réussir et vous nous avez montré la voie à suivre à nous les hommes politiques », Mälläs Zénawi lors de la cérémonie de clôture des XVIe championnats d’athlétisme d’Afrique (le 4 mai 2008, à Addis Abäba).

Depuis la fin des années 1990, de nombreux Etats subsahariens – parfois démarchés par des organisations non gouvernementales et divers fonds d’investissement privés et internationaux – ont élaboré des pédagogies physiques et sportives inscrites dans leurs politiques de « développement » et de « reconstruction » post-conflictuelle. Cette « politique du survêtement » n’est pas nouvelle : dès les années 1950 (et bien plus ardemment dans les décennies qui suivirent les décolonisations), de nombreux pays ont développé des parties de football (Alegi, 2004), des jeux de piste et de capture (Honwana et de Boeck, 2005) ou encore des danses d’affrontement (Ranger, 1975) qui ont contribué au mûrissement de mobilisations politiques des plus pacifiques aux plus radicales  (Bancel, Denis et Fatès, 2003 ; Fair, 1997). Le Rwanda offre un exemple révélateur des trajectoires obliques que peuvent prendre ces activités. Du début des années 1990 au mois de juillet 1994, le transfert de conduites sportives, chorégraphiques et guerrières vers la mise en œuvre du génocide a été grandement conditionné par l’engagement (volontaire, conseillé ou forcé) de plusieurs milliers de danseurs, de footballeurs et de supporters dans les groupes extrémistes qui menèrent les pogroms anti-Tutsi (notamment interahamwe). Dans le contexte d’une politique développementaliste transformée en ordre génocidaire (Viret, 2009 ; Straus, 2006), ces groupes miliciens se sont engagés dans une articulation dynamique de savoirs corporels acquis dans le monde du « loisir » et de dispositifs miliciens issus de la société civile (Riot, 2014). De nos jours, et tandis que ces activités furent précédemment affectées à des processus de socialisation politique des plus radicaux, le gouvernement du Rwanda post-génocide convoque les mêmes pratiques (via le dispositif itorero, inspiré de pratiques précoloniales et qui mêle danses guerrières, football et veillées de défis) afin – selon ses propres termes – de combattre la « mentalité génocidaire » et de reconstruire une société profondément marquée par la violence de masse (Riot, Boistelle et Bancel, 2016).

Continuer la lecture de Appel à contributions : Techniques des corps politiques

Call for proposals: Techniques of Political Bodies

 

Call-for-proposals

Techniques of Political Bodies

Issue coordinated by Thomas Riot and Nicolas Bancel

Institut des sciences du sport de l’Université de Lausanne (ISSUL-SSP), Institut des mondes africains (IMAF-CNRS)

« Africa has failed. You, the athletes, were the only ones to succeed and you have shown us the way, to us, the political leaders », Mälläs Zénawi during the closing ceremony of the XVIth African field championships (4 May 2008, Addis Ababa).

Since the end of the 1990s, many sub-Saharan states have elaborated pedagogies about physical activities and sports as part of their policies for « development » and post-conflict « reconstruction ». Non-governmental organisations and various private and international investment funds have sometimes been instrumental in these efforts to build these programmes. This « tracksuit politics » is not new. As early as the 1950s (and with greater fervour in the decades that followed decolonization), several countries developed football games (Alegi, 2004), paper chase and games of capture (Honwana and de Boeck, 2005), or even dances of confrontation (Ranger, 1975), that contributed to the maturation of political mobilization – whether pacific or confrontational (Bancel, Denis and Fatès, 2003; Fair, 1997). Rwanda provides a relevant example of the oblique trajectories these activities can follow. From the early 1990s to the month of July 1994, sports practices as well as choreographic and warlike behaviours were mobilized to implement the genocide; this shift rested upon the engagement – be it voluntary, advised or forced – of several thousands of dancers, footballers and spectators in the extremist groups that led the anti-Tutsi pogroms (notably the interahamwe). In the context of this shift from a developmental order to a genocide order (Viret, 2009; Straus, 2006), militia groups  articulated in varied ways bodily knowledge acquired in the sphere of sports and hobbies, and militia dispositions as developed within the civil society (Riot, 2014). While these activities previously informed some of the most drastic processes of political socialization, Rwanda’s post-genocide government summoned the very same practices (through the itorero device, inspired by precolonial practices, that combines war dances, football and contest nights) in order to fight the « genocide mentality » – as the regime says – and reconstruct a society deeply affected by mass violence (Riot, Boistelle and Bancel, 2016).

Continuer la lecture de Call for proposals: Techniques of Political Bodies

Disillusioned tomorrows ? « Authoritarian restorations »

Call for papers for the academic journal Politique africaine

Disillusioned tomorrows ?

« Authoritarian restorations »

Amin Allal (CERAPS) & Marie Vannetzel (CURAPP)

Call-for-proposals

« Authoritarian restoration ». The term is commonly invoked, yet rarely defined. Is this a sign that it is merely an expression, not claiming to any use but a loose use? The scenario of « authoritarian restoration » has long mainly referred to the so-called « suspended transitions » or « illusive democratizations » that many sub-Saharan countries experienced in the 1990s. It has been brought up to date on the occasion of the « Arab Spring ». How do we account for these « moments » in which authoritarian reconfigurations of power follow democratization processes? What can we do with these tomorrows disillusioned?

Continuer la lecture de Disillusioned tomorrows ? « Authoritarian restorations »

Des lendemains qui déchantent ? Les « restaurations autoritaires »

Appel à contribution pour la revue Politique africaine

Des lendemains qui déchantent ?

Les « restaurations autoritaires »

Coordonné par Amin Allal (CERAPS) & Marie Vannetzel (CURAPP)

Appel-polaf1

« Restauration autoritaire ». L’expression est couramment invoquée, et pourtant, rarement définie. Est-ce le signe qu’elle ne serait que cela, une expression, ne prétendant à rien d’autre qu’à un emploi relâché ? Le scénario de la « restauration autoritaire » renvoyait surtout aux « transitions suspendues » ou aux « démocratisations en trompe-l’œil » que de nombreux pays d’Afrique subsaharienne avaient connues dans les années 1990. Il a été remis au goût du jour à l’occasion des « Printemps arabes ». Comment rendre compte de ces « moments » dans lesquels des reconfigurations plus ou moins autoritaires du pouvoir succèdent à des processus de démocratisation ? Que faire de ces lendemains qui déchantent ?

Continuer la lecture de Des lendemains qui déchantent ? Les « restaurations autoritaires »

Journée d’étude de l’Association des chercheurs de Politique africaine (ACPA)

acpa

Journée d’étude de l’Association des chercheurs de

Politique africaine (ACPA)

Les matériels du vote: dispositifs et imaginaires de la citoyenneté

& L’Ethiopie après Meles Zenawi (à paraître)

31 mai 9h00-16h00. CERI, 56 Rue Jacob, Salle de conférences

Les matériels du vote: dispositifs et imaginaires de la citoyenneté

Responsables scientifiques : Sandrine Perrot (CERI- Sciences Po), Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle (IFRA Nairobi), Justin Willis (Durham University)

9h00-12h00. Présidence : Richard Banégas (Sciences Po-CERI)

Introduction par Sandrine Perrot (CERI- Sciences Po), Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle (IFRA Nairobi), Justin Willis (Durham University)

De qu(o)i le bulletin de vote est-il le nom  ? Les modalités pratiques de l’expression électorale au Rwanda (1956 – 1990)

par Florent Piton (CESSMA, Université Paris Diderot)

Waiting and voting in the village: Electronic voting machines in Namibia’s 2014 elections

par Gregor Dobler (Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg)

Élections, entre modernité et tradition : l’exemple malgache

par Denis Lahiniriko (Université d’Antananarivo)

12h00-13h30 : Pause déjeuner

13h30-15h30. Présidence : Florence Brisset (IMAF, Université de Paris 1)

Le chitenje de la discorde. Vêtement partisan et négociation du lien politique au Malawi

par Paul Grassin (CESSP, Université Paris 1)

A steady and orderly flow’: polling stations and the material culture of elections

par Justin Willis (Durham University)

L’Ethiopie après Meles Zenawi

Responsable scientifique : Jean-Nicolas Bach (LAM, IEP de Bordeaux)

15h30-16h00 : Présentation du numéro « L’Ethiopie après Meles Zenawi : un autoritarisme à bout de souffle ? » par Jean-Nicolas Bach (LAM, IEP de Bordeaux). Numéro de Politique africaine à paraître en juin 2016.

La journée d’étude sera suivie de l’Assemblée générale de l’ACPA 16h00 à 18h00 (réservée aux membres de l’ACPA) et d’un pot.